Egos

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  • Hugh MacLeod’s Illustrated Guide to Life at Microsoft

    gapingvoid
    Laura Viberti
    27 Jul 2015 | 3:50 pm
    For the last wee while, Gapingvoid has been working with Microsoft, to create a body of work that expresses the company vision under its new CEO, Satya Nadella. The Microsoft Stories cartoon series “Hugh MacLeod’s Illustrated Guide to Life at Microsoft” launched today during OneWeek 2015! The team and I have traveled to Seattle for Microsoft OneWeek. I will be giving two talks: one on Creativity, as an update to “Ignore Everybody“, and another on Company Culture as the key to being happy at work. We’ll be premiering the new work there. Windows 10 is also…
  • What I loved about Twitter

    Scripting News
    3 Aug 2015 | 6:24 am
    This came up in a thread on Facebook. There are a lot of things that could be done to shake up Twitter and provide users with some fresh functionality to explore. Because that's what I think we all loved about Twitter, the chance to do new things. I love the network, the combination of people, software, ideas and data. Twitter got stagnant. That's the real problem. Almost any change that opened up new functionality for people to explore that allowed them to connect with other people in new interesting and meaningful ways would rekindle the spark that Twitter used to be. Then I read a piece…
  • Self cleaning

    Seth Godin's Blog on marketing, tribes and respect
    Seth Godin
    3 Aug 2015 | 1:47 am
    My friend Lisa is fascinated by the self-cleaning oven. In principle, it takes care of itself, an ongoing cycle of productivity. One button gets it dirty, then another button cleans it right up. Even better, consider the camera that cleans its sensor every time it's turned on. Relationships, processes, interactions--these can be self cleaning too, if we build them that way. Instead of waiting for things to degrade or even to break, we build in a cycle of honesty, a tradition of check-ins. Instead of a strategy that includes [and then an emergency happens/and then a miracle happens] as a key…
  • Star Wars: The Princess, the Scoundrel, and the Farm Boy

    kottke.org
    Jason Kottke
    3 Aug 2015 | 10:14 am
    Lucasfilm is coming out with a set of books about the first three Star Wars movies written by authors of acclaimed teen and preteen books. The first is Star Wars: A New Hope. The Princess, the Scoundrel, and the Farm Boy. The other two are called Star Wars: The Empire Strikes Back. So You Want to Be a Jedi? and Star Wars: Return of the Jedi. Beware the Power of the Dark Side! (via dooce) Tags: books   movies   Star Wars
  • A New Chapter: Prophet Acquires Altimeter

    Charlene Li
    Charlene Li
    22 Jul 2015 | 6:06 am
    I’m excited to announce that Altimeter is being acquired by Prophet Brand Strategy, a global brand and marketing strategy consultancy. There are two reasons why this acquisition makes so much sense for us. First, it will grow Altimeter’s impact and influence. Prophet will invest in Altimeter’s infrastructure to support our research agenda and to help amplify […] The post A New Chapter: Prophet Acquires Altimeter appeared first on Charlene Li .
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    Scripting News

  • What I loved about Twitter

    3 Aug 2015 | 6:24 am
    This came up in a thread on Facebook. There are a lot of things that could be done to shake up Twitter and provide users with some fresh functionality to explore. Because that's what I think we all loved about Twitter, the chance to do new things. I love the network, the combination of people, software, ideas and data. Twitter got stagnant. That's the real problem. Almost any change that opened up new functionality for people to explore that allowed them to connect with other people in new interesting and meaningful ways would rekindle the spark that Twitter used to be. Then I read a piece…
  • Braintrust: Updates on EC2 for Poets

    2 Aug 2015 | 3:35 pm
    Over the last few days I've posted a couple of pieces for the braintrust, asking questions about what desktop people like for Ubuntu, and soliciting advice for launching a Node app so it persists and stays out of the way. I've got some progress to report. I punted on installing a desktop at least for the first release. I never managed to get it working. Too complicated. Need to approach this again. Maybe the second time will be gold. I am running two processes on the poets machine, one that runs River4, accessible on port 80, though it's running on port 1337; and the other a background app…
  • They forgot the readers

    2 Aug 2015 | 9:28 am
    Peter Baker, a reporter at the NYT posted a dismissive tweet about the mess with the Hillary Clinton emails. Technology companies do this too. It's easier to narrow your world to "players" and forget who's paying your salary. And that you're talking over their heads, and missing that the real damage isn't with the Clinton organization, but with your readers. Let's review where we're at... Their source was anonymous. Therefore when we read the article we have no way of judging the trustworthyness of the source, we can only depend on the trust we have with the person who chose the source, the…
  • Google, open web are natural allies

    2 Aug 2015 | 8:04 am
    In 1998, when Google started, the blogging world was just getting started too, and the two fed on each other. We put knowledge on our blogs, they indexed them. So now we could find each other, and they had stuff worth finding. In the last corner-turn, as our ideas have moved into silos, Twitter and Facebook, it's harder to create and find value. On Twitter because it's hard to pack much value into a 140-char soundbite, and on Facebook, the focus has been more social than knowledge-building. But there are still unsolved problems in the open web, areas where Google has built new expertise, that…
  • Braintrust: Desktop for Ubuntu?

    1 Aug 2015 | 8:43 am
    A question for the Scripting News braintrust... First, remember that I am working on the new EC2 for Poets. I am talking about software that will be pre-installed on a Ubuntu-based AMI that's designed for people who use Macs and PCs, so they can run apps in the cloud. I make several such apps, for example River4, PagePark, Noderunner and the amazingly useful and adaptable nodeStorage. The best desktop for Ubuntu? Now that the standard recital is out of the way... I'm thinking about including a desktop interface, so that people who like Finder-like graphic filesystem browsers (such as myself,…
 
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    Seth Godin's Blog on marketing, tribes and respect

  • Self cleaning

    Seth Godin
    3 Aug 2015 | 1:47 am
    My friend Lisa is fascinated by the self-cleaning oven. In principle, it takes care of itself, an ongoing cycle of productivity. One button gets it dirty, then another button cleans it right up. Even better, consider the camera that cleans its sensor every time it's turned on. Relationships, processes, interactions--these can be self cleaning too, if we build them that way. Instead of waiting for things to degrade or even to break, we build in a cycle of honesty, a tradition of check-ins. Instead of a strategy that includes [and then an emergency happens/and then a miracle happens] as a key…
  • Show us the pictures

    Seth Godin
    2 Aug 2015 | 1:12 am
    There’s an increasing gulf between the privacy of individuals and that of corporations and monopolies. An individual is almost certainly going be videotaped every time he leaves home. You will be caught on camera in the store, at the airport and on the street. Your calls to various organizations will also be recorded “for quality purposes.” At the same time, it’s against the law to film animal cruelty on farms in many states. And if you say to a customer service rep, “I’m taping this call,” you’re likely to be met with hostility or even a dead line. Kudos, then, to police…
  • Yes!, please and thank you

    Seth Godin
    1 Aug 2015 | 2:37 am
    Don't jerk people around Here's a simple marketing strategy for a smaller company trying to compete in a big-company world: Choose your customers, trust them, treat them well. Say yes. Bend the rules. Show up on time. Keep your promises. Don't exert power merely because you can. Be human, be kind, pay attention, smile. Not everyone deserves this sort of treatment, not everyone will do their part to be the kind of customer you can delight and serve. But that's okay, you don't need everyone. When in doubt, be the anti-airline.        
  • On adding a zero

    Seth Godin
    31 Jul 2015 | 2:29 am
    Just about everyone can imagine what it would be like to add 10% more to their output, to be 10% better or faster. Many people can envision what their world would be like if they were twice as good, if the work was twice as insightful or useful or urgent. But ten times? It's really difficult to imagine what you would do with ten times as many employees, or ten times the assets or ten times the audience. And yet imagining it is often the first step to getting there.        
  • Three things that make CEOs stupid

    Seth Godin
    30 Jul 2015 | 2:28 am
    I sat through an endless presentation by the CEO of a fast-growing company. He was doing fine for half an hour, but then, when his time was up, he chose to spend 45 minutes more on his final slide, haranguing and invecting, jumping from topic to topic and basically bringing the entire group to its knees in frustration. Power, of course, is the first problem. When things are going fairly well, the CEO has a ton of power, and often, that power makes things appear to work, even when they're not the right thing to do for the long-term. As a result, there's no market that is correcting the bad…
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    kottke.org

  • Star Wars: The Princess, the Scoundrel, and the Farm Boy

    Jason Kottke
    3 Aug 2015 | 10:14 am
    Lucasfilm is coming out with a set of books about the first three Star Wars movies written by authors of acclaimed teen and preteen books. The first is Star Wars: A New Hope. The Princess, the Scoundrel, and the Farm Boy. The other two are called Star Wars: The Empire Strikes Back. So You Want to Be a Jedi? and Star Wars: Return of the Jedi. Beware the Power of the Dark Side! (via dooce) Tags: books   movies   Star Wars
  • Around the world in three years

    Jason Kottke
    3 Aug 2015 | 8:32 am
    Walter Chang saved up, quit his job, travelled around the world for three years, and made this video. I went to South America and trekked through Patagonia. In Zimbabwe, hippos, lions, and elephants roamed through our camping ground. When I got to South Korea, my relatives treated me as one of their own, despite having last seen them 18 years prior. It was in China, the third country of my trip, when I realized that what I was doing wasn't totally crazy. I had already met a multitude of other backpackers taking extended trips ranging from several months to four years. Young people from abroad…
  • Mad Men Carousel: The Complete Critical Companion

    Jason Kottke
    31 Jul 2015 | 1:06 pm
    One of my favorite movie/TV critics, Matt Zoller Seitz, is coming out with a book this fall on Mad Men called Mad Men Carousel: The Complete Critical Companion. Mad Men Carousel, authored by Abrams' bestselling author Matt Zoller Seitz, will gather all of Seitz's widely read (and discussed) Mad Men essays in a single volume. Rather than simply recalling the plot through lengthy summary, Seitz's essays dig deep into the show's themes, performances and filmmaking, with the tone and spirit of accessible, but serious, film or literary criticism. This novel-sized volume will be designed to have a…
  • Louis CK: Of course... But maybe?

    Jason Kottke
    31 Jul 2015 | 9:13 am
    This four-minute bit by Louis CK puts me on the floor every time I watch it and then makes me feel really horrible. Everybody has a competition in their brain of good thoughts and bad thoughts. Hopefully, the good thoughts win. For me, I always have both. I have like the thing I believe, the good thing, that's the thing I believe and than there's this thing. And I don't believe it, but it is there. It's always this thing and then this thing. It's become a category in my brain that I call "of course, but maybe". I love his gestures throughout this bit...the material is great but the physical…
  • The Making of Stanley Kubrick's '2001: A Space Odyssey'

    Jason Kottke
    31 Jul 2015 | 7:52 am
    Last year, Taschen came out with a limited edition book on The Making of Stanley Kubrick's '2001: A Space Odyssey'. Only a couple thousand were made and one of them is selling on Amazon for $1750. This year, they're releasing a regular edition for a much more reasonable $47. (via @michaelbierut) Tags: 2001   books   movies   Stanley Kubrick
 
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    Charlene Li

  • A New Chapter: Prophet Acquires Altimeter

    Charlene Li
    22 Jul 2015 | 6:06 am
    I’m excited to announce that Altimeter is being acquired by Prophet Brand Strategy, a global brand and marketing strategy consultancy. There are two reasons why this acquisition makes so much sense for us. First, it will grow Altimeter’s impact and influence. Prophet will invest in Altimeter’s infrastructure to support our research agenda and to help amplify […] The post A New Chapter: Prophet Acquires Altimeter appeared first on Charlene Li .
  • My New Book “The Engaged Leader” is Now Available!

    Charlene Li
    17 Mar 2015 | 1:28 pm
    First time I’m holding the book, @SXSW Bookstore I’m excited to unveil my latest book, The Engaged Leader, available today. I held it for the first time on Friday and there’s nothing like that first view of your “baby”. I wrote the book for all of the leaders who know they need to engage in digital […] The post My New Book “The Engaged Leader” is Now Available! appeared first on Charlene Li .
  • Announcing My New Book “The Engaged Leader”

    Charlene Li
    19 Feb 2015 | 10:07 am
    My work with CEOs and other leaders has proven time after time that the wisdom and experience a great leader brings to the table are the keys to making his or her digital transformation stick. Any one of the tens or hundreds of digital natives within your organization can teach you to use Twitter, but […] The post Announcing My New Book “The Engaged Leader” appeared first on Charlene Li .
  • Creating a Culture of Content — Empowering Your Employees

    Charlene Li
    3 Dec 2014 | 10:53 am
    Content marketing is hot, but it is not solely created by, inspired by, or used by marketing. Rather, content needs exist throughout multiple facets of an organization – think sales, customer services, thought leadership, recruiting, etc. The result: more and more organizations are focused on creating what Altimeter calls a “Culture of Content” (CoC) to […] The post Creating a Culture of Content — Empowering Your Employees appeared first on Charlene Li .
  • How Good Is Your Social Business Governance?

    Charlene Li
    14 Nov 2014 | 6:19 pm
    In our research and client work at Altimeter, one of the most misunderstood issues we see is social business governance. I’ve seen it defined as everything from social media policies and risk management to organizational structures. My colleague Ed Terpening and I just published a report on how to think about governance – and in […] The post How Good Is Your Social Business Governance? appeared first on Charlene Li .
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    Daring Fireball

  • Inside the Sad, Expensive Failure of Google Plus

    John Gruber
    3 Aug 2015 | 8:04 pm
    Remember Google Plus? Seth Fiegerman goes behind the scenes on its creation for Mashable: For those elsewhere in the company, Google’s approach to Plus represented a radical departure. Most Google projects started small and grew organically in scale and importance. Buzz, the immediate predecessor to Plus, had barely a dozen people on staff. Plus, by comparison, had upwards of 1,000, sucked up from divisions across the company. One employee on a different team recalled thinking at this time, “Where have our engineers gone?” That’s no way to make a successful product.
  • Update: Tony Fadell on Apple Watch

    John Gruber
    3 Aug 2015 | 6:16 pm
    A few weeks ago I linked to a BBC interview with Tony Fadell, in which I thought Fadell took a backhanded shot at the software design of Apple Watch. The BBC’s Leo Kelion kindly emailed me with a full transcript of Fadell’s remarks, which makes clear that my original interpretation was flat-out wrong. I’ve updated the post accordingly.  ★ 
  • The Declining Marginal Value of Crazy

    John Gruber
    3 Aug 2015 | 6:05 pm
    Josh Marshall: In a crowded field, for almost everyone but Bush, it’s critical to grab hold of the mantle of anger and grievance. But the Huckabees and Cruzes simply cannot compete with Trump, who is not only willing to say truly anything but also has — whatever else you can say about his nonsense — a talent for drama and garnering press attention honed over decades. With a mix of aggression, boffo self-assertion and nonsense, Trump has managed to boil modern Republicanism down to a hard precipitate form, shorn of the final vestiges of interest in actual governing.
  • Rob Rhinehart: ‘How I Gave Up Alternating Current’

    John Gruber
    3 Aug 2015 | 5:16 pm
    I read this like eight or nine hours ago, and I still don’t know what to think of it. It’s worth knowing going in that Rhinehart is the creator of Soylent, and Soylent 2.0 launched today. So I think Andy Baio is right that this post was purposefully written to go viral. The thing is, I can’t tell whether this is parody or not. Seems like certain aspects have to be a joke (e.g., his wardrobe: once-worn clothing custom-made in China), but I thought Soylent was a joke when I first heard about it. Even if it is a PR ploy, it’s a damn clever one — at once both deeply…
  • Samsung Computer Display With Built-In Wireless Phone Charger

    John Gruber
    3 Aug 2015 | 5:10 pm
    Clever new product from Samsung. Filed under “Words I didn’t expect to write today”. (Via Chandana Kulatunga.) Update: Of course, since it’s Samsung, they ripped off the old iOS 6 battery image.  ★ 
 
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    Web Strategy by Jeremiah Owyang | Digital Business

  • Collaborative Startups Shift from Contractor to Employee Relationships

    jeremiah_owyang
    30 Jul 2015 | 10:14 am
    On-demand startups, which are a subset of the Collaborative Economy, have been under scrutiny on worker treatment. They’re under the magnifying glass more than ever. This new industry, which was birthed  the 2008 recession, provided rise to the “gig” worker, or independent contractors. These part-time workers were offering their idle time, working multiple jobs, and offering their spare bedrooms to make ends meet. Many of the workers see the benefits of “being their own boss” as they can choose the time, service, and how they work –rather than reporting to a salaried job. In past…
  • Large Companies Ramp Up Adoption in the Collaborative Economy

    jeremiah_owyang
    20 Jul 2015 | 10:18 pm
    The Collaborative Economy market is growing at an accelerated rate. Not only is adoption increasing by individuals at a rapid pace, but the VCs have invested a massive $16 Billion to pad the war chests of these disruptive P2P commerce startups. Corporations aren’t standing on the sidelines waiting to be disrupted, the progressive companies are leading the charge by deploying these same strategies and technologies. The following three slides show market growth, adoption by brands, and indicate how companies are deploying, you can view all the data in a Google Sheet, live on the web and…
  • Is the Crowd a Disruption or an Opportunity for Large Companies?

    jeremiah_owyang
    12 Jun 2015 | 3:44 am
    Many are excited about the new collaborative economy, where people use common technologies to get what they need from each other. This has created disruptions for some industries, but overall, holds much business opportunity for progressive companies. Progressive companies can glean greater loyalty through crowdfunding, turn to the crowd for new co-innovation and launch their own sharing programmes to expand how they serve their customers new desires. Companies who ignore this trend are likely to suffer from disruption, but those that lean in can benefit from using the crowd to their…
  • The Collaborative Sharing Economy has Created 17 Billion-Dollar Companies (and 10 unicorns)

    jeremiah_owyang
    4 Jun 2015 | 10:53 pm
    I partnered with VentureBeat’s market intelligence arm (VB Profiles) to further develop data on the funding, valuation, and employment impacts to the growing Collaborative Economy, this post originally was posted on VentureBeat’s website written by John Koetsier of VB Insight, I’ve republished their content, to share the key findings and you can find a summary of the research here. Sharing is big business. Big big business. There are now 17 billion-dollar companies with 60,000 employees and $15 billion in funding in the sharing or collaborative economy, according to Jeremiah…
  • Can Tech Startups Appease Wall Street While Achieving Their Social Mission?

    jeremiah_owyang
    15 May 2015 | 5:05 am
    Etsy, at least, may have figured it out. (This post originally appeared on Fast Company) Over the last decade, there’s been an outpouring of concern about how Facebook, Google, and other Internet companies treat their user data. This concern continues as the next generation of startups, like Uber, Lyft, Homejoy, and Postmates, are being taken to court by people like worker rights lawyer Liss-Riordan, who formerly filed class-action lawsuits on behalf of truck drivers, waiters, delivery men, cable installers, and call center workers. Industry leaders have written about how these…
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    Scott Adams Blog

  • Best. Complaint. Ever.

    3 Aug 2015 | 6:08 pm
    I got this complaint in my email today. This gentleman says my calendars used to be funny but they no longer are. Read top to bottom to see my response. —- incoming email —-Hi There.I want to share my thoughts on the current [Dilbert] calendar block I am working through this year.I have had these for two or three years but have been completely disappointed with the content in this years’ effort. Gone are the clever jokes and observations and instead we seem to have an almost formula approach which to me frequently misses the mark. I check the daily cartoons on the Dilbert…
  • What is Better Than a Republic?

    3 Aug 2015 | 9:05 am
    Most of you would agree that our democratic system (a republic) is flawed in many ways, and yet it is still better than all the known alternatives.So I thought I would come up with a better alternative.Keep in mind that the Constitution of the United States was written before the Internet. I doubt the founders would have created the system we have today if they had better tools. So I will try to extend their thinking to modern times, when the Internet provides us with more options.I think you would agree that the best political system would involve a talented and enlightened dictator that had…
  • New Olympic Event

    30 Jul 2015 | 6:03 am
    I have often said that training your kid for the Olympics is a form of child abuse because it is such a waste of time and talent. Especially if you don’t win. Training for the Olympics is a good example of not following the odds.But apparently things CAN get worse, at least for the athletes that will be swimming in the rivers in Rio that are equal parts poop and water.If your firewall is blocking the image, see it on Twitter here.I have this image of the TV network that covers the Olympics going to commercial break, everyone in Rio uses the bathroom, and the simultaneous flushing causes a…
  • Living by the Odds

    29 Jul 2015 | 8:09 am
    I like to live my life by the odds. For example, I don’t often ride a bicycle because the risk of injury is high while the enjoyment can be matched by safer activities. For most of my sporting life I played tennis because it offers a good exercise-to-injury ratio. Even distance running is less safe.As a result of my safety bias, and luck too, I have never had a sporting injury of any major consequence. Today, I really, really want to own a motorcycle. But I don’t like the odds. So I don’t.When I was young, my mother brainwashed me on the importance of education for escaping my…
  • Thinking Strategically

    27 Jul 2015 | 8:27 am
    Are you a strategic thinker or a victim?You’re probably one or the other.The other day a smart, attractive, 27-year old, white woman told me it was hard to get a job in California because she is a woman.That’s a victim.A few months ago I had a minor leg injury that looked like it would keep me from doing cardio for a few weeks. My first thought was that it was an opportunity to do more weight training on my upper body, which I wanted to do anyway.That’s strategic thinking.  Every problem creates an opportunity. In the early days of Dilbert it looked as if the strip would fail. It was…
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    Doc Searls Weblog » Doc Searls Weblog »

  • What’s the best way customer love can help a brand?

    Doc Searls
    3 Aug 2015 | 5:34 pm
    In “Cool Influencers With Big Followings Get Picky About Their Endorsements,” Sydney Ember of the NY Times writes, The more brands that use influencers for marketing campaigns on social platforms like YouTube, Twitter and Instagram, the less impact each influencer has. At the same time, many influencers, who once jumped at the opportunity to endorse brands, are being much more selective for fear of appearing to sell out. In How the gig economy has turned bad analysts into vendor advocates, Horses for Sources writes, The technology and services industry today is awash with…
  • Remembering Bob Kauffman

    Doc Searls
    30 Jul 2015 | 11:33 pm
    When the Los Angeles Clippers open their first game at home this season, I want them to pause and celebrate their original franchise player: Bob Kauffman, the team’s all-star center for its first three seasons, when they were the Buffalo Braves. In fact, I think the team should retire Bob’s jersey, #44. For the ceremony the team should also bring out his four daughters, all of whom were also basketball stars: Lara and Joannah at Georgia Tech, Carey at Duke and Kate at Clayton State. Bob died on July 27 at age 69. Bob was an amazing player to watch, a privilege I…
  • What am I doing here?

    Doc Searls
    29 Jul 2015 | 12:42 am
    I was born sixty-eight years ago today, in Jersey City‘s Christ Hospital, at around eleven in the morning. I would have been born earlier, but the hospital staff tied Mom’s legs together so I wouldn’t come out before the doctor showed up. You know Poe’s story, The Premature Burial? Mine was like that, only going the other way: a Postmature Birth. It wasn’t fun. When they finally took the straps off Mom, I was already there, face-first, with my head bent back so far that, when the doctor yanked me out with a forceps, the back of my C5 vertebra was flattened.
  • Why the strange uploads to @Flickr?

    Doc Searls
    19 Jul 2015 | 2:28 pm
    I’ve got 58,765 photos on Flickr, so far. These have 8,618,102 views at the moment, running at about 5,000 a day. The top count this last week was 11,766. Not that I’m into stats. I just want to make clear that I’m deeply invested in Flickr, as a photographer. I’m also a “Pro” customer, meaning I pay for the service. But man, it’s trying me lately. The main thing isn’t the UI changes, which are confusing, and seem to be happening constantly. (Though I’m sure they’re not. I just seem to be discovering new or changed things…
  • Idea: nets from the Nets for Brooklyn’s schools and playgrounds

    Doc Searls
    10 Jul 2015 | 6:28 pm
    Here is a simple idea for the Brooklyn Nets that will do a world of good for their borough and their team: provide new nets for every net-less basketball hoop in every school and playground. The cost of few thousand team color (black and white) nets probably wouldn’t be more than the cost of one player hired at minimum salary. The good will coming from it will be immeasurable. Think about team members going out to playgrounds and helping install fresh nets on empty hoops. The photo opportunities are a lesser benefit than bonding between the team and its borough — or the whole city, if…
 
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    AVC

  • The Other Benefit Of Fundraising

    Fred Wilson
    3 Aug 2015 | 3:21 am
    The reason people go out and fundraise is they need capital for their business. I would not recommend doing it for any other reason. It’s hard and time consuming work and can be extremely frustrating. But there is another benefit of fundraising. You get feedback on your business from people who see a lot of businesses like yours every day. The feedback you get from any one investor can be horrible and you need to learn to ignore off base feedback from idiot investors. And you will find that on the fundraising trail. However the aggregate feedback you get from a diverse collection of…
  • Family Time

    Fred Wilson
    2 Aug 2015 | 6:50 am
    We’ve had my entire family at our beach house this weekend. That includes my 87 year old father, my 19 month old nephew, and a dozen other Wilsons in between. So I’ve got a house full of folks and not a lot of time to post this morning. So if there’s any action here today, it will be in the comments. I hope you are enjoying your summer weekend. I am.
  • Video Of The Week: The Walkoff Homer

    Fred Wilson
    1 Aug 2015 | 4:38 am
    I apologize if you came here looking for the business/tech section and landed on the sports section. But that’s how its going to be today. I grew up an army brat moving every year. I was a baseball fan and my teams were the A’s and the Pirates, the two most colorful teams in baseball in the 70s. When we arrived in NYC in 1983, I had two choices, the Mets and the Yankees. There was no way I was going to be a Yankees fan, so the Mets were the default choice but not one I was excited about. A year later in the summer of 1984, I arrived back in NYC from a business trip on a steamy…
  • Feature Friday: Document Sharing In Slack

    Fred Wilson
    31 Jul 2015 | 2:19 am
    We use a lot of document sharing applications at USV. We use Google Docs, Hackpad (which was bought by Dropbox), Quip, Dropbox’ new Notes service, and a number of other document sharing apps. But as we have moved most of our internal and USV network communications to Slack, we wanted a document sharing app that people in a Slack channel could use. So the hackers at USV, mostly Nick and Brittany, built one. We call it Quackpad, although we’d prefer to call it Slackpad, and you can use it here. Just sign in with your Slack credentials and you are good to go. If you, like us, use a…
  • The Bull Case For Solar

    Fred Wilson
    30 Jul 2015 | 2:38 am
    My partner Albert blogged about solar yesterday and posted this chart: I’d like to add another chart to this conversation, mortgage rates over the past thirty years: The bear case for solar has been that the payback times are too long. But with cost declines (Albert’s chart) and carrying cost declines (my chart), solar makes more sense today than ever. The other chart worth looking at is home energy prices over time. Your payback on solar depends a lot on how much you are paying for alternative sources of energy. This part of the analysis is not as easy. It depends on what kind of…
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    Signal vs. Noise

  • "Is it too early for me to start a pay-per-click campaign?"

    Nathan Kontny
    27 Jul 2015 | 11:04 am
    A Redditor asks: My SaaS product is done. We have a customer who we reached out to locally. I’ve got a freelance writer (via Reddit!) who is working on creating an email course to educate and inform potential customers. Until that is done there is nowhere for me to collect email addresses and start warming them up. However, I do have pricing and plans and the sign up is fully implemented. Is it worth creating a couple ads to start generating some traffic yet? Or is it going to be a complete waste of time until I have that ecourse and am able to collect email addresses? If I do create…
  • A mountain of salt for the Apple Watch satisfaction numbers

    Noah
    27 Jul 2015 | 7:27 am
    We’ve talked a lot about the Apple Watch internally, and even thought a bit about how Basecamp might work on it. A number of Basecampers have gotten Apple Watches, and reviews have been mixed; some people returned their watch, others wear it every single day. Our unscientific, non-representative sentiment runs probably 50/50 satisfied/dissatisfied with the watch. A study reporting high levels of customer satisfaction with the Apple Watch made the round of news sites last week, from the New York Times to Fortune to re/code. The same study was also mentioned by Tim Cook on the most recent…
  • How an idea comes together for me

    Jason Fried
    22 Jul 2015 | 2:08 pm
    First the idea hits. Then I think about it some more and it takes a direction. As I work through the direction, I’ll see another direction. Usually relatively similar, but different enough that it demands its own exploration. As I dig in into the problem, more layers and possibilities reveal themselves. Sometimes they point in entirely different directions. Some seem like big possibilities, others seem smaller. As I keep exploring, some more options emerge. Some independent of the ones I’ve already explored, but others branch off from an existing exploration. As I keep sketching…
  • Cheesecake, the Chicago Way

    Wailin Wong
    22 Jul 2015 | 8:18 am
    The latest episode of The Distance visits Chicago institution Eli’s Cheesecake, which produces the equivalent of 20,000 cheesecakes a day. What goes into a Chicago-style cheesecake? How about a 1,500-pound Chicago-style cheesecake? Listen to the episode to find out. And if you like the show, you can subscribe to The Distance via iTunes or the podcast app of your choice. We’ll be back in two weeks with another episode about a long-standing business.
  • What are people reading on SvN lately?

    Noah
    21 Jul 2015 | 6:38 am
    Size of bubbles corresponds to share of total SvN web readership, January 2014 through June 2015.
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    chrisbrogan.com

  • Is This Interesting?

    Chris Brogan
    3 Aug 2015 | 1:16 pm
    INSTEAD of watching me do dumb things live on Periscope, why not engage me where we can talk back and forth, where I can help, where I can add value. Here’s the Thing If you sign up after reading what I just wrote, please hit REPLY when you get your confirmation and say “Periscope sent me.” Continue ReadingThe post Is This Interesting? appeared first on chrisbrogan.com.
  • Periscope is the Least Interesting Thing I’ve Ever Seen

    Chris Brogan
    3 Aug 2015 | 12:47 pm
    I just logged onto Periscope. I did it mostly because Derek Halpern said this. If you love Periscope, read that. Because I don’t love Periscope. Periscope is Not Interesting To Me The premise is simple: live video in real time. Okay, cool. Except, it’s not especially useful for my business. It’s INTERESTING, but it’s not USEFUL. Continue ReadingThe post Periscope is the Least Interesting Thing I’ve Ever Seen appeared first on chrisbrogan.com.
  • The Last King of Brooklyn

    Chris Brogan
    14 Jul 2015 | 2:24 pm
    The air inside the Brooklyn Bowl smells like well worn leather, sawdust, and evidently hops (from the nearby Brooklyn Brewery, but I’ll get back to them). All around me are authentic Coney Island early 20th century amusement park props, like the tin targets from shooting galleries. There’s a band putting their gear together onstage for an evening event, lots of percussion and fewer amps, so I’m guessing it’ll be some kind of folk or world music. In front of me, Charley Ryan, cofounder of the Brooklyn Bowl (with partner Peter Shapiro) is pressing his business card into…
  • Customer Service is Marketing

    Chris Brogan
    1 Jul 2015 | 9:13 am
    My son, Harold, is huge into video games and video game culture. He knows more weird and deep-level memes and obscure details than you’ll ever know. Harold has convinced me to take him to the SCG Convention in Texas. To say he’s hyped and excited is to really underplay how he feels about it. As part of this, I’ve encouraged Harold to do as much of the planning and deciding as possible. Harold chose the Aloft hotel chain. Swell by me. He picked it because he loved the videos. I prepaid for the days of the conference. And then, I ran into a snag.Continue ReadingThe post…
  • The Biggest Competitive Advantage I Have

    Chris Brogan
    26 Jun 2015 | 11:32 am
    I’m sprawled out on my bed writing to you. My son is reading a copy of Retro Gamer and my daughter is playing Splatoon (it’s a Wii game that your kid probably wants). Lately, I’ve been thinking about this blog, about you, about my business, about what I stand for. That kind of stuff. The Biggest Competitive Advantage I Have is Openness and Honesty But that sounds like I’m trying to be virtuous. I’m not. I just think it’s easier/better/faster to just tell you what I think and feel, instead of worrying. Continue ReadingThe post The Biggest Competitive…
 
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    Calacanis.com

  • TWiST 565: Ahryun Moon, founder of EtchApp & the return of “Ask Jason”!

    Jacqui
    2 Aug 2015 | 2:54 pm
    Hi everyone, Producer Jacqui here. A special two-parter for you. First up is Ahryun Moon, founder of EtchApp, a company that crushed the LAUNCH Hackathon and went onto product success, with their recent launch — and feature — in the Apple store. EtchApp is a multi-tasking replacement keyboard for devices so you can send messages and access services without switching — and just might be, as Jason predicts, THE killer Watch app. And it’s the return of #AskJason! Fans toss questions on a range of topics … from the Jobs Act to new avenues for startups to…
  • Howard Stern’s easy billion dollar pay day — courtesy of Spotify or an app

    Jacqui
    27 Jul 2015 | 12:02 pm
    There is little debate that the greatest radio host in history is Howard Stern. In addition to reinventing himself multiple times, from the long-forgotten battles with the FCC in the 90s to giving Charlie Rose a run for his money over the past decade as ‘greatest interviewer alive,’ Howard’s savviest role is behind the scenes as a platform rainmaker. [ Click to Tweet (can edit before sending): http://ctt.ec/SKy6Y ] First he syndicated his show across the nation after being told his New York humor wouldn’t fly in other markets — heck, they told him he wouldn’t work in Boston…
  • SMARTCAMP: 30 cities, 10 finalists, 1 winner

    Jacqui
    24 Jul 2015 | 7:06 pm
    We’re doing a global startup competition … with IBM! I’m proud to announce that IBM and LAUNCH are hosting SMARTCAMP 2015: a 30-city startup competition. [ Click to Tweet (can edit before sending): http://ctt.ec/7bspf ] $25,000 in funding (from me!) and acceptance into our 12-week, LAUNCH Incubator is the grand prize, and you can read all about it and request an application at smartcamp2015.com. Competitions from Singapore to Sao Paulo are accepting applications, and live events will be occurring across the globe in the fall. Finalists will travel to San Francisco to attend our SCALE…
  • Inside.com’s vertical strategy — looking for some partners!

    Jason Calacanis
    21 Jul 2015 | 3:58 pm
    We’ve been working hard on Inside.com and we’re starting to make great progress with our vertical App strategy. While our main Inside App has a great, loyal following, trying to get a large number of folks to a general App hasn’t been easy — for anyone. [ Click to Tweet (can edit before sending): http://ctt.ec/fmbge ] Of course, getting a smaller number of people to a large number of vertical Apps is, well, easier! As such we’re in the process of experimenting with a dozen vertical Apps. We’re testing big verticals, like TV and video games, as well as…
  • The most important piece of advice for folks starting their careers

    Jacqui
    4 Jul 2015 | 9:54 am
    [ From a tweet storm last week ] 1/The most important piece of advice I can give folks starting out: be great at an important skill. The important skills in the world right now include: a. sales b. coding c. product design d. growth e. design f. corporate storyteller 2/Refine your skill faster than your peers. If you’re a product designer, stop binge-watching TV & read every book on UX. Learn to use every tool you find on the internet. Many folks will tell you that the world is not a zero sum game, with one person not having to lose at the expense of another winning. This is simply…
 
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    Small Business Marketing Blog from Duct Tape Marketing

  • 7 Steps to Optimize Your Blog Posts Like a Pro

    Guest Post
    2 Aug 2015 | 10:00 pm
    7 Steps to Optimize Your Blog Posts Like a Pro written by Guest Post read more at Small Business Marketing Blog from Duct Tape Marketing I’m a content manager; my background is in public relations with a little bit of marketing strategy and graphic design. I’m sitting here thinking, “What do I know about online optimization!?” I’m not a web design guru; I’m no software engineer or web developer. And then it occurs to me, if I can get the basics done, like keyword research, I can easily optimize those blog posts I write by using a simple tool that is built into our WordPress…
  • What Is Shared Hosting and Is it Reliable for a Business Website?

    Guest Post
    31 Jul 2015 | 7:46 am
    What Is Shared Hosting and Is it Reliable for a Business Website? written by Guest Post read more at Small Business Marketing Blog from Duct Tape Marketing photo credit: flickr Imagine that you are trying to start up a website for your company and you want to consider your options. Well, you first should perhaps consider what you are going to do for the exact purpose of the website (whether that is marketing, actually selling products, or offering an online service). Then, you might want to consider some of the design elements of the website and how it might be the best thing for your…
  • Benefits of Outsourcing Marketing Activities

    Guest Post
    30 Jul 2015 | 8:17 am
    Benefits of Outsourcing Marketing Activities written by Guest Post read more at Small Business Marketing Blog from Duct Tape Marketing photo credit: Flickr In the beginning, startup companies are always trying to fix everything by themselves. Their marketing strategies are usually made by self-thought marketing experts, who also work in some other company sectors. This strategy is time-consuming and company owners will realize sooner or later that marketing is one of the key sectors for securing company’s growth. This turning point can lead to two different scenarios, one is they hire a…
  • Geo-Targeting Can Skyrocket Your Conversion Rates!

    Guest Post
    30 Jul 2015 | 6:50 am
    Geo-Targeting Can Skyrocket Your Conversion Rates! written by Guest Post read more at Small Business Marketing Blog from Duct Tape Marketing photo credit: In the Palm of My Hand via photopin (license) As the internet continues to grow at an exponential rate, the average web user is overloaded with a vast amount of information. Website owners only have a few seconds to convince someone that the content on their website is worthwhile reading before the visitor moves on. While there are many methods of engaging your visitors and increasing conversion rates, one that is hardly spoken of but is…
  • The One Thing Every Entrepreneur Must Have

    John Jantsch
    29 Jul 2015 | 6:00 am
    The One Thing Every Entrepreneur Must Have written by John Jantsch read more at Small Business Marketing Blog from Duct Tape Marketing Marketing Podcast with Mark Winters Most true entrepreneurs are dreamers, hustlers and some might say visionaries. They see the world differently, constantly look for new ideas and find innovation kind of a hobby. The also drive people that work for them a little crazy. Working for an entrepreneur is a little like driving down the highway about 6o miles and hour with no steering wheel. What every wildly successful entrepreneur has found, either by accident or…
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    KurzweilAI » News

  • Intracellular microlasers for precise labeling of a trillion individual cells

    3 Aug 2015 | 8:43 pm
    Massachusetts General Hospital investigators have induced subcutaneous fat cells in a piece of skin from a pig to emit laser light in response to energy delivered through an optical fiber (credit: Matjaž Humar and Seok Hyun Yun/Nature Photonics) Imagine being able to label a trillion cells in the body to detect what’s going on in each individual cell. That’s the eventual goal of a Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) study to allow individual cells to produce laser light. The wavelengths of light emitted by these intracellular microlasers differ based on factors such as the size,…
  • Obama signs executive order authorizing development of exascale supercomputers

    3 Aug 2015 | 8:19 pm
    Titan, former world’s fastest supercomputer (credit: Oak Ridge National Laboratory) President Obama has signed an executive order authorizing the National Strategic Computing Initiative (NSCI), with the goal of creating the world’s fastest supercomputers. The NSCI is charged with building the world’s first-ever exascale (1,000-petaflops) computer — 30 times faster than today’s fastest supercomputer. The order mandates: Accelerating delivery of a capable exascale computing system that integrates hardware and software capability to deliver approximately 100 times…
  • A high-performance single-molecule diode

    3 Aug 2015 | 7:37 pm
    Researchers from Berkeley Lab and Columbia University have created the world’s highest-performance single-molecule diode, using a combination of gold electrodes (yellow) and a “TDO” molecule (purple, with molecular structure on the left) in propylene carbonate, an ionic solution (light blue). The circuit symbols on the right represent a battery and an ammeter (A) to measure current flow. (credit: Brian Capozzi et al./Nature Nanotechnology) A team of researchers from Berkeley Lab and Columbia University has created “the world’s highest-performance single-molecule…
  • Millennium Project releases ’2015–16 State of the Future’ report

    3 Aug 2015 | 6:35 pm
    The Millennium Project released today its annual “2015-16 State of the Future” report, listing global trends on 28 indicators of progress and regress, new insights into 15 Global Challenges, and impacts of artificial intelligence, synthetic biology, nanotechnology and other advanced technologies on employment over the next 35 years. “Another 2.3 billion people are expected to be added to the planet in just 35 years,” the report notes. “By 2050, new systems for food, water, energy, education, health, economics, and global governance will be needed to prevent…
  • New supercapacitor design offers record high-energy storage

    31 Jul 2015 | 8:09 pm
    Samples of the new hybrid sol-gel material are shown placed on a clear plastic substrate for testing (credit: John Toon, Georgia Tech) Using a hybrid silica sol-gel material and self-assembled monolayers of a common fatty acid, Georgia Tech researchers have developed a new supercapacitor material that provides electrical-energy storage capacity rivaling some batteries. Capacitors can provide large amounts of current quickly (high power density), unlike batteries. So if this material can be scaled up from laboratory samples, devices made from it could surpass traditional electrolytic…
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    Matt Mullenweg

  • Hong Kong Morning

    Matt
    30 Jul 2015 | 4:40 pm
    The upside of jet lag, like Om discovering the streets of Paris, are enjoying parts of the day you might not normally be awake for, like a beautiful sun rise. Here’s a time lapse I made of the Victoria Harbor in Hong Kong taken from the incredible view I have in my room.
  • MPAA Smoking Gun

    Matt
    27 Jul 2015 | 8:34 am
    Sometimes truth is worse than what you would imagine: Smoking Gun: MPAA Emails Reveal Plan To Run Anti-Google Smear Campaign Via Today Show And WSJ.
  • WordCamp US to be in Philadelphia

    Matt
    23 Jul 2015 | 9:38 am
    There were amazing applications for teams and cities to host the inaugural WordCamp US, a concept originally floated at the State of the Word last year. It was very hard to make a choice, but can now announce that the birthplace of the United States, Philadelphia, will host the first WCUS on December 4th–6th. They will also host it in 2016, but no dates have been chosen yet. Having it the same place two years in a row allows us to keep logistics a set variable and really focus on the rest of the event in the second year. I also want to use it to facilitate experience transfer:…
  • There is No Such Thing as a Split License

    Matt
    21 Jul 2015 | 1:55 pm
    There’s a term that pops in the WordPress community, “split license”, that we should put to rest. It’s sloppy at best, misleading at worst. First, some background. WordPress is under a license called the GPL, which basically says you can do whatever you like with the software, but if you distribute changes or create derivative works they also need to be under the GPL. Think of it like a Creative Commons Sharealike license. In the past people weren’t sure if themes for WordPress were derivative works and needed to be GPL. In 2009 we got an outside legal opinion…
  • Streak Broken

    Matt
    18 Jul 2015 | 6:08 am
    Due to some distractions and mishandling of scheduled posts on my part, I broke my blogging streak. I got up to 198 days, which isn’t bad, and I’m looking forward to beating it next time. A lot of people might not know this, but if you’re on WordPress.com or run Jetpack when you start a posting streak it will give you a notification high-five every day you continue it, this was the last one I got:
 
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    Tom Peters

  • In Defense of PowerPointA BookNot a “Book”

    Tom Peters
    15 Jul 2015 | 5:42 am
    I am about to unleash a book on you. A book—not a "book." Said book (not "book") is in PowerPoint. 100%. My colleagues insist that not everybody is like me. Not everybody dotes on PowerPoint. Damn. I mainly give speeches. My speeches are based on PowerPoint presentations. Fact: I "do" PowerPoint. Fact: I "am" PowerPoint. […] The post In Defense of PowerPointA BookNot a “Book” appeared first on Tom Peters.
  • 50K

    Tom Peters
    7 Jul 2015 | 2:57 pm
    No. I do not believe it. I just (a few days ago) posted my ... 50,000th tweet. 50,000. Who woulda thunk? There are ideas I care about. And twitter is a great platform to have an ongoing discussion with (mostly) likeminded colleagues. Thousands upon thousands thereof. It adds up to a lot of time. Too […] The post 50K appeared first on Tom Peters.
  • Top 50 Social Employee Advocacy Leaders

    Cathy Mosca
    23 Jun 2015 | 3:55 am
    Tom is proud to be included among the honorees on this list: The Top 50 Social Employee Advocacy Leaders (SEAL) on Twitter. We think it's a great accomplishment for a thinker born before the baby boomers to be in the forefront of an issue born with the Millennials. The post Top 50 Social Employee Advocacy Leaders appeared first on Tom Peters.
  • The 15-Second “Pep talk”(And more)

    Tom Peters
    17 Jun 2015 | 1:33 pm
    Summary to a colleague of my recent 15-minute speech ("pep talk"): Don't worry about '21st century leadership' (my assigned topic). If you are just decent to people, listen instead of talk, respect and encourage them, are religious about 'managing by wandering around,' most things will work out. And I said that, in the end, taking […] The post The 15-Second “Pep talk”(And more) appeared first on Tom Peters.
  • Hong Kong World Biz Forum 2015

    Cathy Mosca
    2 Jun 2015 | 6:13 am
    Tom continues his round-the-world travels, speaking today at the World Business Forum 2015 in Hong Kong. It's the first time the event has visited that location. Hong Kong World Business Forum 2015 | Hong Kong WBF, Long Version The post Hong Kong World Biz Forum 2015 appeared first on Tom Peters.
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    Intuitive Systems

  • Interview with Mitch Vandell, Author of “Bargepole Management”

    Dave Taylor
    24 Jul 2015 | 3:34 pm
    When business author Mitch Vandell contacted me, I was intrigued by the title of his new management book “Bargepole Management“. I know what a barge is, I know what a bargepole is by extension, but what does it all have to do with management and career strategies? To find out more, we had a conversation about it… ​Why did you write “Bargepole Management” and what’s different about it? What sets this book apart from other management is that instead of promoting ideal behaviors for a perfect world it looks at the realities of human and organizational…
  • Email Pitch 101: Don’t Confuse Your Recipient

    Dave Taylor
    15 Jul 2015 | 6:47 am
    I get a remarkable number of pitches from sales people associated with online marketing companies and in almost all the cases, the only information I have to go on is the message itself. Is it well written? Does it suggest that they have even half a clue about what my business is about? Do they list any recognizable brands or clients? Heck, is it grammatically correct and are all the words spelled properly? And then there are odd messages that end up just demonstrating how not to do online marketing, like this one: Here’s what I find most intriguing about this message:  Zach, the…
  • Monster vs. Beats (Apple)

    Dave Taylor
    17 Jun 2015 | 7:21 am
    In the category of “it’s always important to think through the actions that your legal team is recommending” I submit the latest in the troubled relationship between Apple Computer and Beats Audio, from the Wall Street Journal: Apple Revokes Monster’s Authority to Make Licensed Accessories. Why is this happening? Because Monster forgot that when Apple bought Beats audio, that meant that the company was now protected by the famously aggressive Apple legal and business team, not its own couple of attorneys. Beats headphones at an Apple Store. Monster, it turns out,…
  • Interview with business book author Valeh Nazemoff

    Dave Taylor
    29 Apr 2015 | 6:55 am
    When I was sent a copy of the book The Four Intelligences of the Business Mind I decided it’d be more interesting to interview the author, Valeh Nazemoff, than just write about the book itself. Thus this interview… Q: What are the four intelligences of the business mind, Valeh? The Four Intelligences of the Business Mind are made up of financial, customer, data and mastermind intelligence. In order to transform a business, leaders can go beyond the traditional paradigm of intellect, such as IQ, and employ these four aspects of intelligence to truly succeed. Decision makers are…
  • Smart: the Tosee Intelligent Cigarette Filter

    Dave Taylor
    24 Mar 2015 | 5:56 am
    I don’t smoke. In fact, I’ve never smoked a single cigarette in my life, but my Dad smoked most of his life, though in the latter part of his life he was down to a single cigarette he’d make last through much of a day because he knew of the ill effect it could have. He tried to quit but tobacco has addictive ingredients and it’s darn hard to just stop. I can appreciate that, and supported his one cig/day habit as he was older. There are many aspects to smoking beyond the ingredients and while it does seem to be diminishing as a habit, as you can see in the graph below…
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    Conversation Agent - Valeria Maltoni

  • Sir Ken Robinson on the Relationship Between Imagination, Creativity, and Innovation

    Valeria Maltoni
    3 Aug 2015 | 7:10 am
    “Logic will take you from A to B. Imagination will take you everywhere.” - Albert Einstein “Imagination is the beginning of creation. You imagine what you desire, you will what you imagine, and at least you create what you will.” - George Bernard Show Sir Ken Robinson's body of work is one deserving of attention. Robinson is best known for the self deprecating sense of humor with which he delivers a very important message: “Imagination is the source of all human achievement.” A leader in the development of creativity, innovation and human resources, working with governments and…
  • Ogilvy on Advertising: I Predict 13 Changes

    Valeria Maltoni
    2 Aug 2015 | 7:10 pm
    “I have never been a futurist, and every passing year my interest in the future declines,” says David Ogilvy in the closing of his book On Advertising, a classic. When his publisher asked him to predict the changes we will see in the ad business from his vantage point of industry leader writing somewhere in 1985, he says: 1. The quality of research will improve, and this will generate  bigger corpus of knowledge as to what works and what doesn't. Creative people will learn to exploit this knowledge, therefore improving their strike rate at the cash register. 2. There will be a…
  • Brazilian Entrepreneur Bel Pesce on the Five Easy-to-Believe Myths that Kill Dream Projects

    Valeria Maltoni
    31 Jul 2015 | 2:40 am
    Entrepreneur Bel Pesce left Brazil to study at MIT to then return to her native country after a successful stint in Silicon Valley. She believes in making ideas happen. Her talk is a good example of the trouble with “good enough.” She says: I dedicated the past two years to understanding how people achieve their dreams. When we think about the dreams we have, and the dent we want to leave in the universe, it is striking to see how big of an overlap there is between the dreams that we have and projects that never happen. What are the five easy-to-believe myths that kill our dreams?
  • The Trouble with "Good Enough"

    Valeria Maltoni
    30 Jul 2015 | 2:40 am
    We have all wrestled with this question -- what is the point of diminishing returns between value and effort? When is something “good enough?”  The image above is from my talk at Dare Conference in May on making learning a habit. The central point being: Children feel the excitement of learning more strongly than the fear of the unknown. For adults the balance is reversed: we stop learning when we’re afraid of leaving the safety of what we know. Here's the video, if you're interested. To get what we want, we often do need to commit to changing our behavior. Renown leadership and…
  • Solve Problems by Thinking Small

    Valeria Maltoni
    29 Jul 2015 | 2:40 am
    In Think Like a Freak, the authors of Freakonomics, Steven Levitt and Stephen Dubner offer to retrain our brain. The central thesis of the book is that we need to think small to tackle some of the world's biggest problems, piece by piece. Big problems, they say: ... are by their nature really hard to solve for a variety of reasons. One is they're large and therefore they include a lot of people and therefore they include a lot of crossed and often mangled and perverse incentives.But also a big problem -- when you think about a big problem like the education reform. You're dealing with an…
 
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    Jeffrey Zeldman Presents The Daily Report: Web Design News & Insights Since 1995

  • If Ever I Should Leave You: Job Hunting For Web Designers & Developers

    Jeffrey Zeldman
    30 Jul 2015 | 8:05 pm
    Stagnation is fine for some jobs—when I was a dishwasher at The Earth Kitchen vegetarian restaurant, I enjoyed shutting off my brain and focusing on the rhythmic scrubbing of burnt pans, the slosh and swirl of peas and carrots in a soapy drain—but professionals, particularly web professionals, are either learning and growing or, like the love between Annie Hall and Alvy Singer, becoming a dead shark. If you’ve stopped learning on the job, it’s past time to look around. Source: If Ever I Should Leave You: Job Hunting For Web Designers and Developers · An A List Apart Column
  • The Designer As Writer and Public Speaker

    Jeffrey Zeldman
    30 Jul 2015 | 6:09 am
    I’M ALWAYS telling my colleagues and students that a designer who wants to make a difference and enjoy a long career must master writing and public speaking. I’ve seen way too many designers with far greater natural gifts than I possess struggle in early, mid-, and late career, because, despite their great talent and the thoughtful rigor of their work, they lack the practiced, confident communications ability that every designer needs to sell their best work. Few designers currently working better exemplify the designer-as-communicator than Mike Monteiro, co-founder of Mule Design…
  • Publishing Versus Performance: Our Struggle for the Soul of the Web

    Jeffrey Zeldman
    29 Jul 2015 | 10:21 am
    MY SOUL is in twain. Two principles on which clued-in web folk heartily agree are coming more and more often into conflict—a conflict most recently thrust into relief by discussions around the brilliant Vox Media team, publishers of The Verge. The two principles are: Building performant websites is not only a key differentiator that separates successful sites from those which don’t get read; it’s also an ethical obligation, whose fulfillment falls mainly on developers, but can only happen with the buy-in of the whole team, from marketing to editorial, from advertising to design.
  • A List Apart Summer Reading

    Jeffrey Zeldman
    28 Jul 2015 | 1:46 pm
    SUMMER is halfway over. Have you hid out for a day of reading yet? Grab a shady spot and a picnic blanket (or just park it in front of the nearest AC unit), turn off your notifications, and unwrap this tasty treat: our 2015 summer reader. Refresh your mind, heart, and spirit with this curated list of articles, videos, and other goodies from the recent past—from A List Apart and across the web. Our 2015 compilation of articles, blogs, and other gems from across the web: perfect summer reading, poolside and beyond. Source: 2015 Summer Reading Issue · An A List Apart Article
  • Co-Design, Not Redesign, by Kevin M. Hoffman – An Event Apart Video

    Jeffrey Zeldman
    27 Jul 2015 | 7:17 am
    MOVE from the nightmare of design by committee to the joys of design collaboration. In this 60-minute video captured live at An Event Apart Orlando: Special Edition, Kevin M. Hoffman explains how service design thinking, lean approaches to user experience, and co-design processes offer an alternative to the usual (expensive) design project frustrations, and deliver experiences to delight your users. Source: An Event Apart News: Co-Design, Not Redesign, by Kevin M. Hoffman – An Event Apart Video
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    Andy Sernovitz | Damn, I Wish I'd Thought of That!

  • Service though technology (We’re going to the White House)

    Andy Sernovitz
    3 Aug 2015 | 2:00 pm
    We’re in a time of crappiness in politics — endless roadblocks, complaining, and negativity. But there’s a bright spot in Washington: The amazing work of the US Digital Service. They are teaching government agencies how to build better software. This matters, because each improvement makes life easier for millions of citizens. Faster care for veterans, quicker benefits for seniors, and fewer hassles for all of us. Good government is independent of politics, and we all win when the government gets better at doing good work. Read about their inspiring work here and here.
  • Better is better than new.

    Andy Sernovitz
    3 Aug 2015 | 8:00 am
    Beef jerky might be the oldest form of prepared food. But that doesn’t mean that entrepreneurs can’t find a new way to make it special. The folks at ThinkJerky.com are doing delicious things with star chefs (sriracha honey!) — along with a lot of clever marketing. (They sent me some excellent samples – check out the Kickstarter.) Here’s the real lesson for all of us: Everyone tells entrepreneurs that they need to come up with some radical new idea to change the world. That’s not actually true — you just need to make something a lot better.   Apple…
  • Newsletter #1048: The “Lessons from Drybar” Issue

    Andy Sernovitz
    30 Jul 2015 | 8:00 am
    [Welcome back to the Damn, I Wish I’d Thought of That! newsletter. This is text of the great issue all of our email subscribers just received. Sign yourself up using the handy form on the right.] We were inspired by this conversation between Inc. writer Liz Welch and Alli Webb, founder of Drybar, a mobile salon that only offers wash and blow-dry services. She told Liz that while a lot of competitors are starting to copy her model, staying true to the business has helped Drybar stay ahead. Here are three lessons to learn from their persistence: 1. Do less, better 2. Think about every…
  • It could have been so great

    Andy Sernovitz
    28 Jul 2015 | 8:00 am
    We were staying in a beautiful seaside resort. It was nice. But it fell just short of great. We probably won’t be back. It would have been so easy to be impressive — fix the toilet paper holder and loose doorknob, a little WD-40, a few towel hooks.  The difference between OK and GREAT is caring for the details. Not strategic wizardry, not tech innovation — lots of companies do things similar to the best companies. But the ones who care most about the tiniest customer-facing details win every time.
  • It’s not the critic who counts

    Andy Sernovitz
    27 Jul 2015 | 7:00 am
    Fascinating how many Deadheads found a reason to criticize the Grateful Dead’s farewell concert tour (example). Folks, it’s a concert by a band that played more than 2,500 concerts over the years. And this time you can watch a live stream for 20 bucks. About as uncontroversial as you can get. But here’s the real lesson: No matter how good you do, someone will find a reason to complain about it. Sometimes those people look and sound like fans, but they’re not. Ignore the noisy critics — they are a distraction and a trap. The secret to success: Dedicate your energy…
 
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    @ProBlogger

  • ProBlogger Podcast: Can You Really Make Money Blogging?

    Darren Rowse
    3 Aug 2015 | 7:01 am
    photo credit Ah yes – this old chestnut. Can bloggers really make money blogging? It’s a subject I find myself talking about a lot, and it’s often the most popular question I get asked. Last year we did a theme week on ProBlogger.net on that exact topic, where every day we took a look into popular ways to monetize (links are below). In today’s ProBlogger Podcast episode, we crack this chestnut wide open. It’s the first episode that isn’t in the 31 Days to Build a Better Blog Challenge, although they’re all still there (and on iTunes) if you’d…
  • Thinking of Quitting Blogging? The Tale of One Blogger Who Did (and What Happened Next!)

    Stacey Roberts
    2 Aug 2015 | 7:22 am
    There has been a definite shift in the blogosphere over the last 12 or so months, and I’ve heard story after story of people who feel a real sense of transition in the air. Blogging can take a toll on the strongest of people, what with its 24-hour cycle, it’s relentless need to be updated, and its ability to totally take over your life if you let it. What I’ve noticed, though, is how hard it is for people to let go. Either to let go of their blogs completely, or to let go of the parts of blogging that don’t serve them (me included!). It could be fear holding them…
  • 31DBBB Day 31: Next Steps

    Darren Rowse
    30 Jul 2015 | 1:00 pm
    Congratulations! You’ve made it to Day 31. Hopefully you’ve found some of the challenges over this last 31 days to be useful. Thousands have completed the program over the years and I’ve heard so much great feedback, but there’s one thing I’d like to share with you today on the podcast. What’s the key to really getting the most out of 31 Days to Build a Better Blog? And how do you do that? I share all! You will need a calendar set up somewhere so make sure you have one you can use before you get going with today’s challenge. Nothing will change if you…
  • The ProBlogger Podcast: Digging into Statistics

    Darren Rowse
    29 Jul 2015 | 1:00 pm
    Almost the last day! While yesterday we looked to the future to build a plan to find readers, today we’re going to dig into our stats to find out what kind of effect the last 29 days have had on our sites. What can you see is different after the changes you’ve made? Some of you will be seasoned pros at looking at your stats, but if you’re newer to blogging and want some starting points, these are the metrics I recommend you keep track of regularly as you go on with your blogging. In the show notes I also link to a post I published recently that gives you an overview of how I…
  • How to Develop the Right Plan to Grow Your Blog’s Readership

    Darren Rowse
    28 Jul 2015 | 1:00 pm
    We’re getting to the end of our time together, and in these last few days I like to look to the future and see how we can use what we’ve learned over the last few weeks on our blogs. Today’s challenge is a simple one, although it might take you a bit of time, but it shouldn’t be skipped. We’re going to switch from creating content and the day-to-day of building community with our readers, and do things that are a little more long-term and strategic. Today is all about growing your readership. I’ll discuss some of the drawbacks of focusing solely on content…
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    Brian Solis

  • Why Marketers Should Care About Millennials and Anyone Living a Digital Lifestyle

    Brian Solis
    3 Aug 2015 | 5:52 am
    What is a Millennial, and why should a marketer care? That was the question Adobe’s Simon Nicholson asked me during Adobe Summit EMEA in London earlier this year. I joined Simon in a live chat on the topic and have included the fun, casual yet informative conversation below… Let’s start with this, the definition of Millennials is imprecise, with the consensus being they’re aged around 18-34. But one of the key points that I emphasized in our discussion is that marketers shouldn’t think of Millennials as a generation based on age, but on living a connected lifestyle. I…
  • Like Every Business, We Too Stand on the Path of Disruption

    Guest Author
    27 Jul 2015 | 7:50 am
    Guest post by Jay Samit (@jaysamit), a serial entrepreneur and author of the bestselling book Disrupt You! Your career is going to be disrupted.  I guarantee it.  Office automation is expected to make 40% of the current workforce obsolete by 2020.  3D printing is anticipated to eliminate 320 manufacturing jobs; further impacting the millions of truck drivers replaced by autonomous vehicles.  We are now living in an era of endless innovation where technology continues accelerating exponentially while businesses struggle to adapt arithmetically.  And for all of you who feel secure in a…
  • Creating Truly Personal Omni-Channel Customer Experiences

    Brian Solis
    21 Jul 2015 | 5:40 am
    During a recent trip to London, I spent time with the Smart Focus team to discuss the promise and shortcomings of omni-channel strategies. It was a pretty productive collaboration resulting in a video that explores the new digital customer, an ebook focused on omni-channel experiences and a webinar on the future of marketing. Customers are more connected and more informed than ever. Digital marketers now need an entirely fresh perspective to succeed in a world where customers and prospects experience their brand in multiple ways – online ads, websites, mobile, social, email,…
  • The New Marketing Contract and Why Context is the Future of Marketing

    Brian Solis
    16 Jul 2015 | 5:13 am
    We live in a time of great technology evolution and revolution. Innovation is not only upon us; it affects, even disrupts, us as marketers and as consumers of other businesses. Your customers are more connected than ever before and they’re always on. The number of touchpoints between businesses and customers has exploded. Technology is everywhere and something new is always on the horizon. Wearables. Smart watches. The Internet of Things. Everything is changing. Indeed, today’s consumers are more empowered than any other generation to engage with brands on their own terms. They have…
  • Today’s Digital Video Revolution & The Future of Brands

    Guest Author
    13 Jul 2015 | 5:37 am
    Guest post by Brendan Gahan (@BrendanGahan), a YouTube marketing expert helping Fortune 500 brands with their YouTube influencer and community building campaigns. He was named Forbes 30 Under 30 in Marketing & Advertising and one of the 25 Top YouTube Business Power Players for 2013. The past month there’s been a wealth of speculation in the blogosphere regarding livestreaming services Periscope and Meerkat. Who is going to win? Which platform will crush the other? Which app is the future of livestreaming? But… who cares? These ongoing debates remind me of the Vine vs Instagram video…
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    Joho the Blog

  • [2b2k][liveblog] Wayne Wiegand: Libraries beyond information

    davidw
    2 Aug 2015 | 10:20 am
    Wayne Wiegand is giving the lunchtime talk at the Library History Seminar XIII at Simmons College. He’s talking about his new book Part of Our Lives: A People’s History of the American Public Library. NOTE: Live-blogging. Getting things wrong. Missing points. Omitting key information. Introducing artificial choppiness. Over-emphasizing small matters. Paraphrasing badly. Not running a spellpchecker. Mangling other people’s ideas and words. You are warned, people. He introduces himself as a humanist, which brings with it a curiosity about what it means to be a human in the…
  • Restoring the Network of Bloggers

    davidw
    1 Aug 2015 | 6:46 am
    It’s good to have Hoder — Hossein Derakhshan— back. After spending six years in an Iranian jail, his voice is stronger than ever. The changes he sees in the Web he loves are distressingly real. Hoder was in the cohort of early bloggers who believed that blogs were how people were going to find their voices and themselves on the Web. (I tried to capture some of that feeling in a post a year and a half ago.) Instead, in his great piece in Medium he describes what the Web looks like to someone extremely off-line for six years: endless streams of commercial content. Some of the…
  • Reddit is not a community. But there’s a little more to say.

    davidw
    29 Jul 2015 | 10:35 am
    Dennis Tenen has an excellent post reminding people that calling Reddit a community is at best sloppy. I have committed this sloppiness, although at times I do try to be more careful, because I fundamentally agree with Dennis on this. In fact, I resist calling anything on the Net a community because it’s a word worth preserving, although I’m afraid it has already slipped its moorings and has floated away from its original meaning. I think of communities in their traditional sense as being people who care about each other more than they have to. Even so, Adrienne Debigare…
  • Angry Birds Pansies

    davidw
    26 Jul 2015 | 7:01 am
    Pansies are supposed to look like thoughtful faces, right? That’s where the word comes from. But something seems to have pissed them off. Or maybe their DNA somehow got mingled with Ed Asner’s. The post Angry Birds Pansies appeared first on Joho the Blog.
  • How far wrong has the Net gone? A podcast with Mitch Joel

    davidw
    20 Jul 2015 | 5:38 am
    My friend Mitch Joel and I talk for about an hour (sorry) about whether our hopes for the Net have proven to be forlorn. You can listen here. The spur for this conversation was my recent article in The Atlantic, “The Net that Was (and Still Could Be).” The post How far wrong has the Net gone? A podcast with Mitch Joel appeared first on Joho the Blog.
 
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    craigconnects

  • Desperately seeking trustworthy news

    Craig Newmark
    3 Aug 2015 | 8:27 am
    Maybe I’m desperate for trustworthy news, and progress in that direction, but possibly good news surfaced recently, that I missed on first reading. First, yes, I’m very much, and only a news consumer, and want to respect the boundary between consumer and news professional. I just want news I can trust. Several months ago I stumbled on the post about The Trust Project which is about standards for ethical conduct (trustworthiness) and other signals for “quality” news posts. The deal is that a news outlet could tag news articles with code indicating their code of ethics and related…
  • Why a NYT Editor Left Her Job to Start the News Site Kicker

    Craig Newmark
    29 Jul 2015 | 6:58 am
    Kicker is a news website that helps you get up to speed easily by making news digestible, engaging, and actionable. They’re one of the women-led startups who came in 3rd place for the Women Startup Challenge Pitch Competition. Holly Ojalvo and Lisa Vehrenkamp, Kicker Cofounders, are the real deal. Holly Ojalvo and Lisa Vehrenkamp, of GoKicker.com, at the Women Startup Challenge Kicker provides helpful explanations on the most important and compelling news of the day, along with ways to take action so readers don’t feel helpless or hopeless while they’re getting their news. They pride…
  • craigconnects.org 2.0 — Better, nerdier

    Craig Newmark
    23 Jul 2015 | 11:09 am
    Folks, many of you may know that I don't tend to change things that are working just fine. You may have noticed this from all the change that's happened to craigslist over the years. (yes, the Mrs. reminds me I'm not as funny as I think I am…) My team, however, finally convinced me that it's time we make craigconnects.org, the online hub of the philanthropic initiative I'm focusing almost 100% of my time on, more modern and accessible.  craigconnects.org was first built in 2011, and it's hard to believe that was more than 4 years ago. I wanted to create a…
  • 4 Women-led Startups Disrupting Travel

    Craig Newmark
    16 Jul 2015 | 10:08 am
    Hey, I travel quite a bit. I travel for public service and philanthropy, not business; I haven't been in craigslist management since 2000. (I hear that people travel for "pleasure" or on "vacation," which I understand are mythological concepts.) Photo Credit: TripCommon Website It's always nice to see new apps and startups that make traveling less of a hassle, and that help you find good, local food. 1. TripCommon – Follow @tripcommon TripCommon was born out of cofounder Gillian Morris' years of struggling with outdated, buggy travel search and booking…
  • Empowering Women’s Political Leadership Globally

    Craig Newmark
    15 Jul 2015 | 8:22 am
    Folks, the first-ever Women Startup Challenge just took place, and some important women-led startups really worked hard to raise money for their ventures. My team and I interviewed one of the ventures, Mina's List and their Founder/Executive Director Tanya Henderson, Esq., about their inspiring work. What's Mina's List? Mina’s List: Empowering women’s political leadership globally, was founded in 2014 as a non-profit organization dedicated to realizing women’s equal (50%) and substantive political representation in national governments around the world. Substantive…
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    Jessica Gottlieb A Los Angeles Mom

  • We Just Went from a Glass of Wine to a Bottle of Jack Daniels

    Jessica Gottlieb
    18 Jul 2015 | 6:49 pm
    Watch the latest video at video.foxnews.com Filed under: The sky is not falling The post We Just Went from a Glass of Wine to a Bottle of Jack Daniels appeared first on Jessica Gottlieb A Los Angeles Mom.
  • The New American Marriage

    Jessica Gottlieb
    26 Jun 2015 | 6:22 pm
    Today the Supreme Court of the United States affirmed the rights of gay Americans to marry. This morning there was a celebration of rainbows and love and shortly thereafter politicians and quasi religious leaders began with hateful horrible statements. I need to remind you why gay marriage matters. I need to remind you that your gay children are at a much higher risk for depression and suicide. You’re worried about teaching them to cross the street? How about making sure they don’t throw themselves in front of a train. A society that acknowledges that same sex love is of equal…
  • If You Want to Change Your Life You Should Fire Your Friends

    Jessica Gottlieb
    20 May 2015 | 7:57 pm
    I’m done blogging. I’m not blogging again. Blogging is not my job and to every email pitching something that all the mommies will always love I simply reply, “I’m not a blogger anymore please take me off your list.” That felt really great. I like the idea of not being on every publicist’s email list. My peers have stopped blogging. Most of the women I worked with at Momversation have shuttered their sites. PhD In Parenting is no more and I’m not even sure what’s happening with other large sites. Most have been sold or are dying slow deaths. At…
  • Endings

    Jessica Gottlieb
    4 Apr 2015 | 8:52 pm
    One of the things that I’ve noticed as a reader is that there are a number of books that are good, great even, until the ending and then they sort of just unravel and stop. It’s as though the author knew they needed to stop writing but didn’t quite know how. I fear that this site has that problem. Blogging has changed and I haven’t. I was texting with a friend just a bit ago who also quit blogging recently and she said, “It sucks having gone from innovators to dinosaurs.” Consider this my mic drop. Blogging was my full time job for a number of years. They…
  • Parenting In Public

    Jessica Gottlieb
    31 Mar 2015 | 10:49 am
    Yesterday we went to a museum. Actually I should say that yesterday we went to yet another museum. A museum Mr. G had no interest in going to, a museum that Jane had been to just 10 days prior and the 8th museum in the third country that my son had visited since March 12th. Yesterday my family accompanied me to a museum that only I was interested in and after two hours of looking at paintings they waited for me outside the gift shop while I picked up some postcards. As I approached them they looked like this. This is how Gottliebs do museums and how I ensure that no one ever asks me for…
 
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    inessential.com

  • Swift Diary #7: Protocols, Arrays, and Casting

    2 Aug 2015 | 5:02 pm
    I mentioned before that I’m making heavy use of protocols in my new apps. Here’s what got me today: Let’s pretend I’m writing an email client. (This is an example I use on my blog for historical reasons, and should not be taken as indicative.) I have a tree of Node objects. Each Node has a represented object, which is a data model object. There’s a NodeRepresentedObject protocol. There are also more-specific protocols. EmailMessage, for instance, is a protocol because I might need different concrete classes for different types of accounts (Gmail, IMAP, POP, etc.). My class Mailbox…
  • Swift Diary #6: Window Controller Initialization

    1 Aug 2015 | 2:57 pm
    I’m working on UI code — and the below took me a half hour and quite a bit of frustration to figure out, so I thought I’d better write it up. Here’s the deal: I want my window controllers (and view controllers too) to know about their nib name, but the outside world should not know about their nib name. Here’s how I handle this in Objective-C: the NSWindowController’s subclass has an init method that references the nib name. - (instancetype)init {   return [self initWithWindowNibName:​@"SomeNibName"]; To instantiate the window controller from elsewhere, I just do…
  • Swift Diary #5: Yet More Uses for KVC

    29 Jul 2015 | 10:03 am
    I’ve argued before (here and here) that pure Swift objects and structs need KVC or something like it. I keep running across real-world uses. I present two more. Templates In NetNewsWire you could create a custom theme, which was a CSS file, an HTML template, and, optionally, some assets. Inside a template you could type things like [[newsItemTitle]], and at render-time that string would be replaced with the title. How this was done: The template renderer took two objects: A string — the template itself. (The thing that included some HTML and code like [[newsItemTitle]].)…
  • Swift Diary #4: KVC Again

    24 Jul 2015 | 10:04 am
    Al Skipp wisely writes (in reply to my post about KVC): It's still the case that Stringly typed code is a pain in the Aris to write/debug/maintain. True. So true. But let me remind you of a place where most iOS and Mac developers do it all the time: Interface Builder. Interface Builder is a Very Fancy XML Editor Some developers eschew Interface Builder (IB) altogether. That’s fair. I myself don’t automatically reach for it — there are times when a UI is so simple that it doesn’t need it, or it’s too dynamic to be expressed well in IB. So I at least think about it before I go there.
  • Swift Diary #3: Arrays, Protocols, and Pointer Equality

    23 Jul 2015 | 10:10 am
    Let’s say I’m writing a Finder replacement. (Disclaimer: previous statement may or may not be true.) The common representation of the file system in a GUI app is a tree. A common pattern, then, is to create a tree data structure. The tree is made of Node classes, and each Node has a representedObject which conforms to the NodeRepresentedObject protocol. A representedObject may be a Folder or a File. All the Node class knows is that its representedObject conforms to NodeRepresentedObject. Each Node has zero or more children. The children are Node objects also. The children’s…
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    RexBlog.com

  • Competitive Outrage

    Rex Hammock
    1 Aug 2015 | 2:41 pm
    I haven’t commented on the outrage of the week, the killing of Zimbabwe’s “most beloved lion,” Cecil, by a big game hunting dentist from Minnesota named Walter Palmer. By the time I was aware of the Cecil killing, the internet outrage was far more than anything I could come up with, so I passed even tweeting about it. Besides, the only thing I could think of to say that I hadn’t seen before was how white the dentist’s teeth were — obviously, a Photoshop job. The competitive nature of internet outrage is fascinating. My recent post about the…
  • Why Google+ Failed: It Was a Pigpen Product, Not a Lucy Product

    Rex Hammock
    29 Jul 2015 | 6:34 am
    Because I’ve blogged a rather long time, I now have the privilege to point back to things written long ago (as history is so prone to repeat itself). For instance, five years ago, I shared my theory that the products Google constantly releases fall into two categories: the “Lucy Google” product or the “Pigpen Google” product. I point to that earlier post because of the failure of Google+ as a product (but a failure that contains many products that IMHO, once freed from the social networking shackles of Google+ will be successful), If you are wondering what I…
  • Google Maps Timeline Feature

    Rex Hammock
    23 Jul 2015 | 11:56 am
    Now that Google has moved Google Photos away from Google+ and has tied it into Google Drive, Google has started adding all sorts of features I plan to blog about later. However, this feature roll-out was announced yesterday and is worth a special shout-out. (I’m a fan-boy of Google Maps.) As described by the Google Maps blog, the “Time Line” feature on Google Maps will not only let you tie location information to a Google Map, if you use Google Photos, it will display those on the timeline and map, as well. A similar “photo-on-map” feature has been on Flickr…
  • Flickr Album: Approaching Oakland (7.12.2015)

    Rex Hammock
    17 Jul 2015 | 10:18 pm
    Related posts: That light you see at the end of the tunnel is the Hope Train approaching Bike Month, 2015 I buried the album cover
  • Heritage of Convenience

    Rex Hammock
    11 Jul 2015 | 8:18 am
    A lot has changed during the two weeks since I posted my view of the Confederate flag being used by Southern state  governments in a way that suggests the people of that state are honoring some type of mythological concept of heritage . If you are among the 12 people who read this blog, I don’t need to catch you up. South Carolina did the right thing. Other states should follow. And, members of the U.S. House of Representatives should also. From the Washington Post story, “As S.C. prepares to lower battle flag, Boehner calls for Confederate review,” comes this quote that…
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    Berkeley Blog

  • Call to Obama: Ban All Woody Allen Filmmaking!

    Berkeley Blog
    3 Aug 2015 | 7:10 am
    Before Obama leaves office – and that is more important than legislation affecting climate change – he needs to place a universal ban on production of film pollution by Woody Allen, whose latest movie, The Irrational Man, has denigrated what was once considered an art form to by-the-numbers screenwriting in which all the characters are an iteration of Woody Allen’s troubled persona. The main character, played by Joaquin Phoenix, who has taken on a grotesque belly akin to a five-month pregnancy, is a philosophy professor at a small college on the East Coast that apparently doesn’t mind…
  • Robert Frost Needs to Update "Fire and Ice"

    Berkeley Blog
    20 Jul 2015 | 2:10 pm
    An upbeat apocalyptic poem by Robert Frost called “Fire and Ice” gives Earth two options for extinction: fire or ice. Some say the world will end in fire, Some say in ice. From what I’ve tasted of desire I hold with those who favor fire. I guess consciousness about climate warming came too late for the poet laureate to pen a newer verse. And now, according to an article in the July 20 edition of The New Yorker by Kathryn Schulz, the Pacific Northwest as well as everything west of Sacramento in Northern California is due for a 9.0 earthquake and subsequent tsunami, obliterating Seattle…
  • “Notes from the Field,” Anna Deavere Smith’s New Play, Asks Us to End the School-to-Prison Pipeline

    Berkeley Blog
    11 Jul 2015 | 9:40 am
    An enthusiastic, diverse audience packed the seats at Berkeley Repertory Theater in Berkeley, CA, on July 10 for a rehearsal of Anna Deveare Smith’s new play, “Notes from the Field: Doing Time in Education.” Smith is known for seamlessly impersonating different characters she has interviewed  to spin a theme, often one that advocates for social change. This time, she stepped onto the stage – bare except for a few chairs, a sofa, and a podium, with a lone bass player, Marcus Shelby, off on one side. Three overhead screens identified her as Sherrilyn Ifill, president and director…
  • Amazon Absent from Bay Area Book Festival

    Berkeley Blog
    18 Jun 2015 | 2:17 pm
    Tens of thousands of lovers of that 20th century artifact – the book – flocked downtown Berkeley the weekend of June 6-7 when publishers the likes of Dharma Press to Heyday, Berrett-Koehler and White Cloud lined in tents along ten traffic-blocked streets. Situated on the border of the inaugural Bay Area Book Festival in Civic Center Park was a walk-through dome built of 50,000 books, all free for the taking. It turns out the books were from the Boston Public Library, which gave its excess stash to Brewster Kahle’s Internet Archive for scanning. I interviewed lovers of the artifact,…
  • U.S. Government Actually Doing Something Good

    Berkeley Blog
    21 May 2015 | 3:36 pm
    At the monthly tech lunch I host at Berkeley Rep, our speaker yesterday was an energetic champion of lifting the 1.4 billion people in the world out of poverty. You’d think Alexis Bonnell was the head of a nonprofit or UN agency, but she’s actually director of engagement and communications of USAID’s Global Development Lab, a one-year-old federal agency that works to end extreme global poverty.  The way it works – and it’s working – is by partnering with private and public institutions as well as with communities in the developing world. The lab is crowdsourcing problems and…
 
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    gapingvoid

  • Hugh MacLeod’s Illustrated Guide to Life at Microsoft

    Laura Viberti
    27 Jul 2015 | 3:50 pm
    For the last wee while, Gapingvoid has been working with Microsoft, to create a body of work that expresses the company vision under its new CEO, Satya Nadella. The Microsoft Stories cartoon series “Hugh MacLeod’s Illustrated Guide to Life at Microsoft” launched today during OneWeek 2015! The team and I have traveled to Seattle for Microsoft OneWeek. I will be giving two talks: one on Creativity, as an update to “Ignore Everybody“, and another on Company Culture as the key to being happy at work. We’ll be premiering the new work there. Windows 10 is also…
  • Employment UX is a visceral experience

    Valerie Urso
    10 Jun 2015 | 7:27 am
    (purchase here) Back in the nineties, I used to have a corporate job in a big office on the 26th floor, in downtown Chicago. The office had a certain smell. Not a bad smell, just the usual, clean, synthetic corporate office smell. When I was new there, and still terribly excited to have such a blue-chip organization to call my own, I loved that smell. Every morning when I’d walk into the office, the smell would ignite my senses and I’d immediately get all excited to have a well-paid corporate job. It was a chemical trigger. Then as time passed and my career at the company tanked, the job…
  • Some new thoughts on Brand Storytelling

    Valerie Urso
    1 Jun 2015 | 3:05 pm
      [Content marketing: One of the @Rackspace cartoons I drew recently for Robert Scoble’s weekly newsletter A decade ago, my buddy Tom Foremski quit his high-status job in journalism as the tech correspondent for the London Financial Times, to go become one of the first professional tech bloggers out there. Back then there was no Techcrunch or Re-Code, there was no proven business model, it was just him and his laptop. It was a very brave, pioneering move for the time. Around the same time, I was doing a little bit of pioneering myself, being one of the earliest content marketers to use…
  • What matters

    Valerie Urso
    8 May 2015 | 8:04 am
    [visit the store]   Every now and then I’ll do a pretty random cartoon. This one qualifies. I’ve always liked churches and religious architecture in general. They’re like constant spiritual reminders in the landscape. Here, I imagined being somewhere in the desert in the Levant. Maybe Israel or Syria or even further East, and seeing an ancient holy place… A church, mosque or temple of some sort. The actual religion doesn’t matter so much. What matters is the “A-Ha!”.
  • If you’re waiting in line for a career, you’re doing something wrong

    Valerie Urso
    29 Apr 2015 | 12:50 pm
      [get the print] Back when I lived in London in the ‘Nineties, I vaguely knew this Irish journalist, call him Simon. He was a flatmate of an old school friend of mine. Simon wasn’t famous or anything, but he was always working. He was pretty successful. He drove a nice car, ate in fancy places and seemed to enjoy his life. Of all the journalists I knew personally, he was by far the most self-assured. What was his secret? It wasn’t that he was smarter or a better writer than the other journalists. There are plenty smart people who can write well in that trade. What made him…
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