Egos

  • Most Topular Stories

  • Customer Experience Happens To You Not Because of You…But It Doesn’t Have to Be That Way

    Brian Solis
    Brian Solis
    20 Nov 2014 | 8:51 am
      Earlier this year, I was asked to write the foreword for a new book focused on experience marketing and CX. The opportunity appeared while I was in the throes of researching and writing my (not yet announced) book. As hard as it was to pull away from it, I must admit that it was a welcome distraction. So, I stopped what I was doing and read the manuscript for Connect: How to Use Data and Experience Marketing to Create Lifetime Customers by Lars Birkholm Petersen, Ron Person, Christopher Nash. As usual, the deal was that I would be allowed to publish the foreword upon the release of the…
  • Good UX

    Andrew Grumet's Weblog
    admin
    15 Oct 2014 | 10:08 pm
    Here are two recent experiences I had with software, that represent a great experience I’d like to see more of: Uber mobile app: When entering your credit card information, instead of manually typing in the number, you take a picture of your credit card, and the app OCRs it from the image. Fitbit Aria: When setting up the scale, software running your computer locates the scale’s wi-fi server, connects to it and automatically syncs your settings, including your home wi-fi login.  No fiddling around tapping things into a keypad on the scale. Bravo, and encore!  
  • Science of Hits

    Matt Mullenweg
    Matt
    20 Nov 2014 | 9:15 pm
    “Because the most-popular songs now stay on the charts for months, the relative value of a hit has exploded. The top 1 percent of bands and solo artists now earn 77 percent of all revenue from recorded music, media researchers report. And even though the amount of digital music sold has surged, the 10 best-selling tracks command 82 percent more of the market than they did a decade ago. The advent of do-it-yourself artists in the digital age may have grown music’s long tail, but its fat head keeps getting fatter.” — The Shazam Effect.
  • 5 Quick Questions with Robert Scoble: What Makes a Great Tech Blog?

    @ProBlogger
    Stacey Roberts
    23 Nov 2014 | 7:08 am
    Robert Scoble is the brains behind the blog Scobleizer (which he’s just abandoned in favour of solely microblogging on Facebook), and a well-respected authority on social media, tech, and blogging. He has worked for Microsoft, and is currently with Rackspace. We were super-fortunate to grab a few minutes of his time to answer five questions about how to make your tech blog a success. What do you think are the essentials a tech blog should have in order to be successful? Define success! For some, it might be just getting an industry discussion going. Others might want to build a media…
  • No Ken Do (Musketeer Barbie Saves the Prince)

    Jeffrey Zeldman Presents The Daily Report: Web Design News & Insights Since 1995
    Jeffrey Zeldman
    22 Nov 2014 | 1:10 pm
    I WATCHED dozens of Barbie videos hundreds of times when my daughter was three and four years old. I can’t praise their animation, dialog, or other cinematic and literary qualities, but this I can say in their favor: every Barbie video we watched was feminist and empowering in its messaging. This was not the Barbie my girl cousin grew up with, wondering which outfit she should wear to please Ken. This Barbie kicked ass. In one video, set in 18th Century France, Barbie and her roommates overcame sexism to become Musketeers. They exposed a conspiracy, beat male villains at swordplay, and…
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    Scripting News

  • My two tech motivations

    23 Nov 2014 | 2:09 pm
    I want to keep the things that are open open. I want to make more things that are open. I need more surface to develop on. I don't at this time work inside a big company. Maybe the only way to play with the good toys is to hook up with one. The more things in #1 keep breaking the harder it is to be independent. Otherwise when people guess my motivations, and they do often, they err wildly. I'm not "for" or "against" anyone. I am not fighting a moral battle. I don't care if anyone else is good or bad. That's for God to decide. Think of me as a showrunner or a movie producer. I have shows I…
  • Everything is broken

    23 Nov 2014 | 9:09 am
    Remember when Microsoft won BTW, the same thing happened with Microsoft when they "won" the browser wars. Quality went to hell. It got so bad we all switched to Macs. Think that can't happen again? I hope you're wrong. iTunes I can't copy files from my main Mac to my iPhone so I have to set it up on my laptop which, for some reason, is able to copy files to my iPhone. I copy some songs over there, but it says it's waiting for something to happen. No problem. I let it have an hour to get 12 songs copied. When I come back, it's still waiting. Here's the screen. This is typical. It never works…
  • Little Pork Chop's corner-turn

    22 Nov 2014 | 2:07 pm
    The transition of Little Pork Chop to a whitelist-based app has been a great success. Basically people are using it for short-form blogging via Twitter. I get to learn from watching how they use it. I'm already getting ideas. Everyone wins.
  • Best geeklove commercial ever

    20 Nov 2014 | 6:38 pm
  • Quick review of Interstellar

    20 Nov 2014 | 4:33 pm
    I loved Interstellar. I liked the story, the acting, the visual effects, the role that love and science play in the story, the scale of it. I never rolled my eyes once. I was in the story from beginning to end. All these are unusual for me. Most movies have me snickering at least a little. Not this one. I was really touched by it. I have also seen 2001 again recently, this summer. This movie is every bit as good as 2001, which was also a lovely movie. But not quite as moving as this one. People who think Interstellar isn't as good might be remembering 2001 as better than it was.
 
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    Seth Godin's Blog on marketing, tribes and respect

  • The jobs only you can do

    Seth Godin
    23 Nov 2014 | 2:51 am
    One of the milestones every entrepreneur passes is when she stops thinking of people she hires as expensive ("I could do that job for free") and starts thinking of them as cheap ("This frees me up to do something more profitable.") When you get rid of every job you do that could be done by someone else, something needs to fill your time. And what you discover is that you're imagining growth, building partnerships, rethinking the enterprise (working on your business instead of in it, as the emyth guys would say). Right now, you don't even see those jobs, because you're busy doing things that…
  • A little more than a bushel, a little bit less

    Seth Godin
    22 Nov 2014 | 2:00 am
    Marketing works best when the effort you put into it is a little more than you think you need and a lot more than the market expects from your project. And projects work best when the amount you need to get done is a little less than the resources you have available. Marketing rewards a taut system, a show of confidence, the ability to be where you need to be with a true story that works. Projects reward slack, the ability to keep your schedule and your quality, to watch the critical path and to make smart decisions. The common errors, then: Pick too big an arena for your marketing, and seem…
  • The tragedy of the last 10%

    Seth Godin
    21 Nov 2014 | 2:29 am
    In a competitive market, if you do the work to lower your price by 10%, your market share grows. If you dig in deep, analyze, reengineer and make thoughtful changes, you can lower your price another 10%. This leads to an even bigger jump in market share. The third time (or maybe the fourth, or even before then), you only achieve a 10% savings by cutting safety, or quality, or reliability. You cut corners, certainly. The last 10% costs your workers the chance to make a decent living, it costs your suppliers the opportunity to treat their people with dignity, and it costs you your reputation.
  • Inventing a tribe

    Seth Godin
    20 Nov 2014 | 2:31 am
    I can't think of a single time that an individual or an organization has created a brand-new worldview, spread it and then led that tribe. There were Harley-type renegades before there was Harley Davidson. There were digital nomads before there was Apple. There were pop music fans before there were the Beatles and Rastafarians before Marley. Without a doubt, a new technology creates new experiences. But the early adopters who gravitate to it were early adopters before we got there. Our job is to find the disconnected and connect them, to find people eager to pursue a goal and give them the…
  • The wrong question to ask yourself before crowdfunding

    Seth Godin
    19 Nov 2014 | 1:59 am
    A friend explained to me all the reasons for her upcoming Kickstarter campaign. The machine she wanted to buy was sorely needed, it would increase her productivity and also make her day significantly easier--it made perfect business sense. These are all great reasons to borrow money from a bank or a professional investor. They aren't good reasons to crowdfund. No, the right question is, "how will the new financial relationship I offer to my biggest supporters enhance their lives?" There's a huge amount of emotion and story we tell ourselves before we send in money to crowdfund something.
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    kottke.org

  • The tl;dr version of the Bible

    Jason Kottke
    21 Nov 2014 | 11:44 am
    At Reddit, a user called Cabbagetroll posted a very short summary of the Bible. GENESIS God: All right, you two, don't do the one thing. Other than that, have fun. Adam & Eve: Okay. Satan: You should do the thing. Adam & Eve: Okay. God: What happened!? Adam & Eve: We did the thing. God: Guys THE REST OF THE OLD TESTAMENT God: You are my people, and you should not do the things. People: We won't do the things. God: Good. People: We did the things. God: Guys (via @mkonnikova) Tags: The Bible   religion
  • Lauren Ipsum

    Jason Kottke
    21 Nov 2014 | 8:33 am
    Lauren Ipsum is a book about computer science for kids (age 10 and up) published by No Starch Press. Meet Lauren, an adventurer who knows all about solving problems. But she's lost in the fantastical world of Userland, where mail is delivered by daemons and packs of wild jargon roam. Lauren sets out for home, traveling through a journey of puzzles, from the Push and Pop Cafe to the Garden of the Forking Paths. As she discovers the secrets of Userland, Lauren learns about computer science without even realizing it-and so do you! Sounds intriguing. And 1000 bonus points for making the…
  • Apple Watch font on OS X Yosemite

    Jason Kottke
    21 Nov 2014 | 6:57 am
    I just upgraded to OS X Yosemite yesterday1 and the Helvetica as the system font is as jarring as everyone says it is. But that new Apple Watch font, San Francisco, seems really nice. So of course someone has worked out a way to use the Watch font as the system font on Yosemite. Here's what you do...just type the following in Terminal.app: ruby -e "$(curl -fsSL https://raw.github.com/wellsriley/YosemiteSanFranciscoFont/master/install)" Then restart your computer. Full instructions are on GitHub. Here's what it looks like: Pretty nice. But it's not perfect. For instance, look at the text in…
  • How Star Wars Conquered the Universe

    Jason Kottke
    20 Nov 2014 | 2:41 pm
    In his recent book, How Star Wars Conquered the Universe, Chris Taylor tells the story of how avant garde cinema fan George Lucas built one of the biggest movie franchises ever. How did a few notes scribbled on a legal pad in 1973 by George Lucas, a man who hated writing, turn into a four billion dollar franchise that has quite literally transformed the way we think about entertainment, merchandizing, politics, and even religion? A cultural touchstone and cinematic classic, Star Wars has a cosmic appeal that no other movie franchise has been able to replicate. From Jedi-themed weddings and…
  • Kara Walker, Afterword

    Jason Kottke
    20 Nov 2014 | 1:08 pm
    On the walk back from soccer practice the other day, my sharp-eyed seven-year-old son spotted something through the partially papered-up window of a Chelsea gallery. "Hey, Kara Walker!" he says.1 And sure enough: The gallery is Sikkema Jenkins on 22nd St and Walker's show, Afterword, starts there tomorrow and runs through mid-January. The show is an extension of A Subtlety, Walker's installation at the Domino Sugar Factory in Williamsburg over the summer. Several of the sugar statues and the left fist of the sugar sphinx from the Domino installation will be shown along with new video works…
 
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    Charlene Li

  • How Good Is Your Social Business Governance?

    Charlene Li
    14 Nov 2014 | 6:19 pm
    In our research and client work at Altimeter, one of the most misunderstood issues we see is social business governance. I’ve seen it defined as everything from social media policies and risk management to organizational structures. My colleague Ed Terpening and I just published a report on how to think about governance – and in […] The post How Good Is Your Social Business Governance? appeared first on Charlene Li.
  • Lessons from the Fall of the Berlin Wall

    Charlene Li
    11 Nov 2014 | 11:24 pm
    25 years ago, I was living in Amsterdam watching the events unfold in Berlin, as the Wall Fell. I saw history in the making on the TV and wanted to be there to witness it. I bought a ticket and took the night train to Berlin, arriving early Saturday morning. I found a youth hostel, […] The post Lessons from the Fall of the Berlin Wall appeared first on Charlene Li.
  • Fun Foray: Electric Vehicle Test Drive

    Charlene Li
    16 Oct 2014 | 11:03 am
    Occasionally, I’ll depart from my usual writing about business and technology and post about something more personal, which I call a Fun Foray.  I recently had the opportunity to test drive an electric vehicle (EV) over the weekend — a Chevy Spark — thanks to the Experience Electric #TheBetterRide program. Background: I’m an ardent hybrid owner […] The post Fun Foray: Electric Vehicle Test Drive appeared first on Charlene Li.
  • My TED Talk: Leading in the Digital Era

    Charlene Li
    13 Oct 2014 | 10:59 am
    I crossed an item off my bucket list when I gave a TED Talk at TED@IBM on Sept. 23rd. The event was part of the new TED Institute, which partners with companies to create TED-curated events. The title of my talk was “Giving Up Control: Leading in the Digital Era”. One key data point from Gallup […] The post My TED Talk: Leading in the Digital Era appeared first on Charlene Li.
  • Blogging as a State of Mind: Reflections on 10 Years of Blogging

    Charlene Li
    24 Sep 2014 | 11:01 pm
    Ten years ago today, I wrote my first blog post, entitled “Blogging as a State of Mind”. I still vividly remember the moment — my palms were sweating as I pressed the “Publish” button on my Typepad blog for the first time. I was excited, but nervous about what was going to happen. What would […] The post Blogging as a State of Mind: Reflections on 10 Years of Blogging appeared first on Charlene Li.
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    Daring Fireball

  • Desk

    John Gruber
    22 Nov 2014 | 7:35 am
    My thanks to John Saddington for sponsoring this week’s DF RSS feed to promote Desk, his blogging app for the Mac. Saddington has been blogging for more than a decade, but never found a blogging app that stuck. So, he built one for himself, focused on what matters most: writing. It’s called Desk, and it’s exclusively for OS X. (And it has one of the best app icons I’ve ever seen — perfect metaphor, beautifully rendered.) Desk has a simple, writing-focused UI. It supports both Markdown (of course) and WYSIWYG for editing, and has direct posting support for a slew…
  • The Secret Life of Passwords

    John Gruber
    21 Nov 2014 | 3:41 pm
    Terrific feature by Ian Urbina for the NYT Magazine: Several years ago I began asking my friends and family to tell me their passwords. I had come to believe that these tiny personalized codes get a bum rap. Yes, I understand why passwords are universally despised: the strains they put on our memory, the endless demand to update them, their sheer number. I hate them, too. But there is more to passwords than their annoyance. In our authorship of them, in the fact that we construct them so that we (and only we) will remember them, they take on secret lives. Many of our passwords are suffused…
  • Stewart Butterfield on Slack

    John Gruber
    21 Nov 2014 | 2:53 pm
    Stewart Butterfield, in an interview with Rachel Metz for MIT Technology Review: I try to instill this into the rest of the team but certainly I feel that what we have right now is just a giant piece of shit. Like, it’s just terrible and we should be humiliated that we offer this to the public. Not everyone finds that motivational, though. I love that attitude. Rather than be satisfied with Slack’s growth and success, he’s focused on how to make it way better, not just a little better.  ★ 
  • Craig Hockenberry on WatchKit

    John Gruber
    21 Nov 2014 | 2:32 pm
    Craig Hockenberry: Bluetooth Low Energy must be really low power: the design of WKInterfaceObject means it’s going to be on a lot. Every interaction with the watch has the potential to move actions and data between your pocket and wrist using the radio. But more importantly, this API design gives Apple a simple way to put a cap on power consumption. We saw this approach in the early days of the iPhone and that worked out pretty well, didn’t it? One final thought about the API design: your code never runs on the watch.  ★ 
  • NY Post: Amazon Planning an Ad-Based Streaming-Video Service

    John Gruber
    21 Nov 2014 | 2:26 pm
    Claire Atkinson, reporting for the NY Post: The e-commerce giant will roll out a new ad-supported streaming offering early next year that will be separate from its $99-a-year Prime membership, which includes a video service, sources said. The ad-supported option — part of an overhaul of its media offerings — poses a serious challenge to streaming rivals such as Hulu and Netflix, analysts said. When TiVo came out 15 years ago, we began using computers to let us skip past commercials. Now, with streaming, we’re using computers to present un-skippable ads.  ★ 
 
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    Logic+Emotion

  • Five Things I Learned In Five Years

    David Armano
    16 Nov 2014 | 6:59 pm
    According to the US Department of labor—the average tenure at at job for 2014 is 4.6 years. In less than a month, I'll be celebrating five years at Edelman, so I thought it would be a good time to reflect in what can be learned in five years, not just on the job but in life as well. I'm a big believer that looking back can help you look forward, so here are are a few things I've learned over the past five years. Mentorship Comes In Many FormsThe traditional image of a mentor is someone who takes you under their wing, puts time aside for you, and imparts wisdom—often a more senior person…
  • Responsive Brand: Chevrolet's #Technologyandstuff

    David Armano
    31 Oct 2014 | 9:46 am
    The Responsive Brand In A Real Time Business Environment In Edelman’s Brandshare study of 15,0000 people worldwide—we asked consumers to tell us which brand behaviours were most important to them. The number one most important behaviour indicated was a brand’s ability to respond quickly to concerns and complaints with 78% of consumers saying it’s important but only 17% feeling brands do this well. But we think a brand’s responsiveness goes beyond replying to people’s concerns and also extends into all forms of communication and engagement in a real time context.  Recently,…
  • Societal: The Third Dimension Of Modern Day Brand Building

    David Armano
    26 Oct 2014 | 7:39 pm
    I started writing this blog back in 2006 and the namesake was completely intentional. "Logic+Emotion" symbolizes the way we've been building brands for the past sixty plus years. Marketers have always known that they have to reach people emotionally in order to capture their attention. We're emotional beings by design and often times make decisions based on how we feel. Our emotions serve as clues that explain our behaviors. We buy clothes because we need them—but the styles and brands we choose have more to do with our psycology than the basic need we must fill. In the same breath we have…
  • Did Google Just Re-Invent E-mail With Inbox?

    David Armano
    24 Oct 2014 | 9:33 am
    While Google Glass appears to be in its death throes, Google is quietly if not systematically re-inventing the digital work horse many of us have a love hate relationship with (mostly hate these days)—E-mail. I've been spending some time with Google's recently released app simply called "Inbox" and after five minutes of use the only thing that kept popping up in my head was this: Is it possible that Google is making e-mail enjoyable again? That's a lofty goal because right now for many of us, e-mail has become a second and third full time job. We use it so much at work that we're often…
  • Three Things Consumers Want From Brands Today: Responsiveness, Involvement and Conviction

    David Armano
    22 Oct 2014 | 7:52 pm
    I'm doing a mini tour of Texas this week having just left Austin and tomorrow I present some of our findings from Edelman's 2014 global study, Brandshare, in Dallas (full report here). The last time I talked about Brandshare, I focused on the macro theme of the report—that consumers indicated brands aren't living up to their side of the relationship when it comes to the value exchange that exists (or doesn't) with brands. The important context here is that we are talking about the relationship beyond the transactions (consumer buys product or services and "consumes"—rinse and repeat). We…
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    Web Strategy by Jeremiah Owyang | Digital Business

  • Massive Spreadsheet: Collaborative Economy Funding

    jeremiah_owyang
    21 Nov 2014 | 5:50 am
    Click on the above image, or you can advance to the SpreadSheet of the Collaborative Economy Funding, to see a mulit-tab analysis of funding, which I update on a regular basis.  Caveat: This sheet is incomplete: there’s data that people continue to submit to me, and also early stage funding is often not reported in public. The Collaborative Economy continues to be a darling of tech investors. In a few short years, these companies have received incredible funding, totaling nearly $7 billion across 169 startups, with no signs of it slowing, as startups continue to seek investors to raise…
  • Funding Comparison: Social Networks vs Collaborative Economy

    jeremiah_owyang
    14 Nov 2014 | 6:46 am
    Social networks were the first phase of digital P2P. They enabled anyone to create media and then share it. The Collaborative Economy is the second phase. It enables anyone to create goods and share what they already own. So, how similar or different are the funding amounts for these two movements? This post provides some insight. There are many ways to compare industries. I’ve conducted analysis on: adoption rates, attitudes, growth rates, and, in tech-heavy industry, funding rates. While investors have often known to be wrong, funding indicates bullish attitudes based on financial…
  • WSJ Essay: The Ups and Downs of Crowd-Based Resources

    jeremiah_owyang
    2 Nov 2014 | 3:24 am
    Below is my most recent essay to the WSJ Accelerator series, a dedicated section for the the fast-moving business audience. In this essay, I explore how we’re drinking our own champagne at Crowd Companies, by exploring and adopting crowd-based services. The Ups and Downs of Crowd-Based Resources Entrepreneurs today have no shortage of crowd-based services to augment their business models. Most people are probably familiar with Lyft and Uber, the ridesharing transportation services, but a large and dynamic industry of crowdsourced tools has emerged to help manage many aspects of running…
  • The Three Reasons the Collaborative Economy is Happening Now

    jeremiah_owyang
    30 Oct 2014 | 8:13 am
    Your customers are making their own goods in the Maker Movement and sharing their resources, rather than buying them from you! Do you know why? We’ve conducted pragmatic research via interviews and other methods to find out. Consumers don’t need to continually buy from traditional companies because they are making, sharing, renting and lending goods & services among themselves. [This rising behavior is being caused by three major trends: Social, Economic, and Technology drivers]   Analysis of Three Market Drivers: The Causes for the Collaborative Economy In the research…
  • Slides and Data: The Collaborative Economy Disrupts Revenue

    jeremiah_owyang
    26 Oct 2014 | 4:35 pm
    Below: see embedded slides, also on Slideshare Disruption Data: The Collaborative Economy Enables P2P Commerce from Jeremiah Owyang Ten years ago, we forecasted that social media would be disruptive to corporations. It was, but mainly to marketing functions, customer care, and corporate communications functions. Fast forward to today, using these technologies and mobile apps, we’re seeing the rise of people getting what they need from each other: They’re sharing homes, cars, rides, money, goods, and their time. This Collaborative Economy is forcing companies to rethink the relationship…
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    Dilbert.com Blog

  • Uber Gets the Buzzfeed Treatment

    19 Nov 2014 | 11:00 pm
    Recently a dipshit editor named Ben Smith over at Buzzfeed ambushed Uber executive Emil Michael by taking out of context something Michael said at a private dinner and publishing it under a misleading headline. It was such a clever ambush that Emil Michael couldn't hope to explain himself without inflaming things further. So he wisely issued a half-assed non-apology-sort-of-apology to make it all go away.But he's stained. That stuff lives forever on the Internet. It was a total hit job and Buzzfeed pulled it off. As Buzzfeed's own article explains, they have a grudge with Uber…
  • A Life Well-lived

    17 Nov 2014 | 11:00 pm
    How do you know if you're living your life right? Is there a standard for that sort of thing?I came up with a little graph of what I think a well-lived life looks like. The idea here is that we are born 100% selfish, as babies. But if we manage our lives well, our selfishness declines continuously until death. Death is the ultimate lack of selfishness.I came to this idea by observing the natural evolution in my own selfishness over the years. In my twenties I would have chewed through a hundred not-yet-dead bodies to get to the top of the pile. In my fifties, I make most of my decisions…
  • How to Stop Teens from Texting while Driving

    16 Nov 2014 | 11:00 pm
    You would become a billionaire if you built a device to stop teens from texting and driving. The insurance companies would love it.I think I figured out an elegant way to stop teens from texting. Yes, I could form a company to produce the product myself. But building a company takes time, and luck, and patent applications, and lots more. I would be dicking around trying to form a company while thousands of people die in the meantime.So I'm going to release this idea for anyone who wants to take a run at it. I think insurance companies would be first in line. And I think they can act…
  • The Transparency Party

    13 Nov 2014 | 11:00 pm
    The other day a friend mentioned that he would vote for the first presidential candidate that agrees to wear a GoPro camera on her head and live-stream every working minute of the presidency. My first reaction to the idea was that it was funny but impractical.But . . . the idea was coming from one of the smartest people I know. So I listened as he unfolded his thoughts. There's a lot of cleverness baked into this simple idea, and it is more doable than you first think.Imagine a charismatic, science-loving candidate, under 40, running a presidential campaign while wearing a GoPro on her…
  • A Ride on the Creative Process

    11 Nov 2014 | 11:00 pm
    I know from the comments on this blog that many of you are interested in the creative process. Let me take you for ride in my head. I took this journey yesterday. It is still fresh in my mind so I can explain it.Most new ideas are combinations of existing ideas. I'll start by describing the random thoughts that inspired one of the most powerful ideas I have ever had. We'll get to the idea itself at the end. I think this idea could cut the unemployment rate in half and turbo-charge the entire economy for generations. And the plan could be fully implemented by the people reading this…
 
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    Doc Searls WeblogDoc Searls Weblog »

  • The Most Spectacular Place You’ll Never See

    Doc Searls
    23 Nov 2014 | 5:21 pm
    Unless you look out the window. When I did that on 4 November 2007, halfway between London and Denver, I saw this: Best I could tell at the time, this was Greenland. That’s how I labeled it in this album on Flickr. For years after that, I kept looking at Greenland maps, trying to find where, exactly, these glaciers and mountains……were. Then, two days ago, I found out. They were just north of the Arctic Circle on the Cumberland Peninsula of Baffin Island, an Arctic landform almost twice the size of New Zealand. There, out my dirty and frosty window over the trailing edge of…
  • On “native” advertising

    Doc Searls
    22 Nov 2014 | 3:57 pm
    In an email today I was asked by a PR person if I wanted to talk with somebody at a major newspaper about its foray into “native” advertising — a euphemism for ads made to look like editorial matter. Among other things they asked if native advertising would “signify the death of credible journalism.” Here was my response: I think tricking up advertising to look like journalism crosses a line I wish (name of paper) would keep up as a thick wall. In publishing, editorial is church and advertising is state. The difference should be clear, and the latter should not be…
  • Some thoughts on App Based Car Services (ABCS)

    Doc Searls
    20 Nov 2014 | 4:18 pm
    I started using Uber in April. According to my Uber page on the Web, I’ve had fifteen rides so far. But, given all the bad news that’s going down, my patronage of the company is at least suspended. As an overdue hedge, I just signed up with Lyft. I’m also looking at BlaBlaCar here in the U.K. (where I am at the moment), plus other alternatives, including plain old taxis and car services again. But here are a few learnings I’ve gained in the meantime. First Uber isn’t about “ride sharing.” That’s just marketing gloss at this point. Instead Uber is what’s coming to be…
  • Summer vs. School

    Doc Searls
    14 Nov 2014 | 9:27 am
    This was me in the summer of ’53, between Kindergarten and 1st Grade, probably in July, the month I turned six years old: I’m the one with the beer. And this was me in 1st Grade, Mrs. Heath’s class: I’m in the last row by the aisle with my back against the wall, looking lost, which I was. Some kids are good at school. I sucked at it until my junior year in college. That was when I finally grokked a rule: Find what the teachers want, and give them more than that. When I shared this insight with my wife, she said “I figured that out in the third grade.” She…
  • Winter arrives

    Doc Searls
    13 Nov 2014 | 6:54 pm
    It’s already snowing across eastern Pennsylvania and much of New Jersey and upstate New York: Still raining steadily here in New York, but hey: snow might come. Either way, Winter’s here.
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    AVC

  • Comments Are Dead, Long Live Comments

    Fred Wilson
    23 Nov 2014 | 4:19 am
    Yet another mainstream media site took down comments this week. In the post explaining the move, Walt Mossberg and Kara Swisher explained that “as social media has continued its robust growth, the bulk of discussion of our stories is increasingly taking place there, making onsite comments less and less used and less and less useful.” That led to a fair bit of discussion around the notion that “commenting is dead.” And like many things that are “dead”, the truth is that they are flourishing elsewhere. Just this week we had a post here at AVC with 880…
  • Video Of The Week: Hating On People

    Fred Wilson
    22 Nov 2014 | 6:44 am
    I’m not a celebrity by any means, but I get hated on in public every so often. http://bit.ly/iekSJw hahahahaha Fred Wilson your an IDIOT! — Ty Hudson (@ooko0) April 8, 2011 It doesn’t feel good to be honest. I really like what Jimmy Kimmel did here to highlight the issue
  • Immigration

    Fred Wilson
    21 Nov 2014 | 4:00 am
    Damn. The President has done it twice in the past few weeks. He’s showing a new side of him and I like it very much. Last night he announced a series of executive actions that “will shield up to five million people from deportation and allow many to work legally, although it offers no path to citizenship”, to quote from the New York Times. It bothers me very much that the US, a nation of immigrants, a place where many (most?) new businesses are started by immigrants or the children of immigrants, a country that has historically welcomed others with open arms, has become…
  • Twitter Time Machine

    Fred Wilson
    20 Nov 2014 | 3:36 am
    I saw my partner Andy tweeting last night about the first time certain words showed up in Twitter: That told me that Twitter had rolled out the ability to search the entire archive. I’m not sure when that happened but this morning I took a trip down memory lane and revisited my first four months on Twitter, from my first tweet on March 12, 2007 until the end of June 2007. The query is “from:fredwilson until:2007-6-30″ and it returned these results. There are a few gems in there but its mostly “I had grilled cheese for lunch” sort of stuff. What is more…
  • Values and Culture

    Fred Wilson
    19 Nov 2014 | 2:42 am
    If the Uber mess over the past few days tells us anything, it is that values and culture matter more than anything. They seep into the product, the user experience, the brand, and ultimately define the company in the market. And all of this comes from the top. It is absolutely true that when you hit the bigtime, which Uber most certainly has, the media will take it to you with a vengeance. I still cringe when I think about Jessi Hempel’s Fortune cover story about Twitter in 2011. They build you up and then they bring you down. That’s the media game. You have to expect it. And…
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    John Battelle's Search Blog

  • Google: The Information-First Conglomerate

    jbat
    21 Nov 2014 | 4:43 pm
    The post Google: The Information-First Conglomerate appeared first on John Battelle's Search Blog. Larry Page on the cover of Fortune, Nov. 13 2014 Last week Google CEO Larry Page got the Fortune magazine cover treatment, the latest of many such pieces attempting to quantify Google’ sprawling business. The business press is obsessed with answering the question of whether we’ve reached “Peak Google.” (Clearly Fortune’s opinion is that we have not, given they named him “Businessperson of the Year.”) “Peak Google” is what I like to…
  • The Web Will Kill Apps

    jbat
    17 Nov 2014 | 9:50 pm
    The post The Web Will Kill Apps appeared first on John Battelle's Search Blog. Lots of the “apps are killing the web” meme going around these days, with the latest batch of casket sealant come from no greater validator of commonly agreed upon wisdom than the Wall St. Journal. “The Web Is Dying; Apps Are Killing It” argues Christopher Mims, and it’s hard to argue with him given the preponderance of current evidence. I disagree. I am in the midst of a long stew on the future of mobile, it’s taken me through deep links and intelligent links, to the future…
  • The Internet Big Five: Doubling In Three Years On A Trillion Dollar Base

    jbat
    16 Nov 2014 | 1:14 pm
    The post The Internet Big Five: Doubling In Three Years On A Trillion Dollar Base appeared first on John Battelle's Search Blog. From time to time I have tracked what I call the “Internet Big Five” – the key platform technology companies that are driving the Internet economy. Nearly three years ago I wrote the first of this series – The Internet Big Five. I identified Apple, Google, Microsoft, Amazon, and Facebook as the “big five,” and compared their relative strengths in financials, consumer reach, and technology strengths. Some of the metrics were…
  • Whither the Public Commons? Enter The Private Corporation

    jbat
    5 Nov 2014 | 8:10 pm
    The post Whither the Public Commons? Enter The Private Corporation appeared first on John Battelle's Search Blog. (image) From time to time a piece reminds us that we are in a slow, poorly articulated struggle over what we hold as a public commons. That was the case with Vanity Fair’s Man and Uber Man, a profile of Uber’s Travis Kalanick by Kara Swisher. Swisher deftly captures Kalanick’s combative approach in prosecuting what he calls Uber’s “political campaign” to beat established regulated markets in transportation, a campaign he believes he must…
  • Else 11.03.14: It’s Over, Google. Now What?

    jbat
    3 Nov 2014 | 9:20 am
    The post Else 11.03.14: It’s Over, Google. Now What? appeared first on John Battelle's Search Blog. (image) Our friends in the press have decided that search has had its decade in the sun, and I can’t disagree, at least as it was known before. The question of how it becomes something else is still very much afoot, but not solved. But glimmerings abound, including from Twitter. For more, read on for the week’s best links…. Google’s dominance in search is nearing its peak – Quartz A number of “Peak Google” pieces are in the air. But let’s…
 
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    Signal vs. Noise

  • Writing-first Design

    Jonas Downey
    21 Nov 2014 | 11:24 am
    A quick way to measure a designer’s maturity is to watch what they do at the beginning of a project. Inexperienced designers are often smitten by the allure of new tools and quick results, so they’ll jump in to Photoshop or Sketch and start messing with layouts and style explorations. Seasoned designers know this can be distracting, so they might start by doing research or drawing in a paper sketchbook instead. Sketching is great, but before I start sketching, I start writing. Writing first has lots of advantages, regardless of the project you’re working on. Here are a few examples.
  • A Glimpse of Artificial Intelligence

    Jamie
    20 Nov 2014 | 11:00 am
    At 8:15 AM I called Safelite Auto Glass for a quote to fix a chip in my car’s windshield. I wasn’t expecting to get the work done today, but the customer service rep gave me a great deal. We scheduled the appointment for 9:30 AM. Then he asked if he could send me an email confirmation. Normally I don’t give out my email address because I don’t want to get on another mailing list. However, in my past experience there’s been miscommunication between the corporate call center and the place of service. In truth, the $50 Safelite quote was way below the $140 dealer…
  • Art and Craft

    Wailin Wong
    20 Nov 2014 | 9:38 am
    Priceless cultural artifacts and works of art belong in a museum, as Indiana Jones taught us. But if the museum doesn’t have the space for that painting or Cross of Coronado, these pieces go to companies like The Icon Group. Photo by Michael Berger Founded in 1980, The Icon Group is a specialized moving and storage business that performs the vital but unsung task of boxing up fine art objects and storing them safely. There’s an incredible amount of knowledge and skill that goes into handling an oddly shaped or fragile piece, and companies like The Icon Group only gain that…
  • PHOTO: A quick lesson on branding—via @gewqk.

    Jamie
    19 Nov 2014 | 6:34 am
    A quick lesson on branding—via @gewqk.
  • PHOTO: Less works.

    Nate Otto
    18 Nov 2014 | 1:55 pm
    Less works.
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    chrisbrogan.com

  • Brown Fur Sweaters and Why I Wasted Over a Decade Mourning My Childhood’s Holiday Rituals

    Chris Brogan
    21 Nov 2014 | 6:48 am
    It’s the strangest thing: I’m sitting on a plane bound for Las Vegas where I’ll attend the premiere of a documentary that I participated in, and I am doing what I do mostly: observing people and their decisions. An older woman in the seat in front of me is on her iPad and using the in-flight wifi, a marvel of technology that allows us nearly unfettered access to the universe while at 30,000 feet! And here’s what she’s doing. She’s typed “brown fur sweater” into the search bar at NeimanMarcus.com . Continue ReadingThe post Brown Fur Sweaters and Why I Wasted Over a Decade…
  • Look Beyond the Sniper Rifle

    Chris Brogan
    11 Nov 2014 | 10:29 am
    I had the pleasure of interviewing Brandon Webb, CEO of Force 12 Media about many things: his writing, his web empire, his books, his view on ISIS, and a lot more. His background, such as it is, includes having run the US Navy SEAL sniper training program and training several of the world’s deadliest snipers. What ended up being interesting to me is that Brandon is often brought onto shows to comment as a US Navy SEAL, but they tend to underutilize his perspective, or ask general questions like, “Boy, it sure is hard to get through your training as a SEAL, isn’t it?”…
  • You Need a Better Network

    Chris Brogan
    6 Nov 2014 | 6:37 am
    I am fortunate to know people like Carey Lohrenz, the first female F14 combat pilot, who gave me the shirt in the picture above. She wrote a great book called Fearless Leadership, by the way, a Wall Street Journal bestseller about how to be a better personal leader and then how to lead others. She’s a top shelf kind of person to know, and I intend to connect with her as often as possible over the coming years. I added her to my Whatsapp account for that reason, too. I want to be able to connect with her when I need something, or when I have something to offer her. Continue ReadingThe…
  • Freakshow – A New Video Show Coming Soon

    Chris Brogan
    29 Oct 2014 | 12:50 pm
    I’m pretty excited to announce a new project I’m doing with the legendary Grant Cardone on his Whatever it Takes Network. It’s called Freakshow and it’s a video show about entrepreneurship but often from the perspective of some extraordinary types you wouldn’t normally get a chance to sit down with and talk business. If you like my other projects, you’ll have a blast with this. Continue ReadingThe post Freakshow – A New Video Show Coming Soon appeared first on chrisbrogan.com.
  • Follow the Value

    Chris Brogan
    29 Oct 2014 | 12:19 pm
    My business is to equip owners. I know that sounds fluffy. The current way I do that is through courses and other educational experiences. But, if tomorrow, I could create some other method to deliver the same kind of value (or better), would I abandon courses? Sure. The courses aren’t the big goal. Delivering value to owners is the goal. Follow the Value I’m obsessed with delivering value. What’s cool about that obsession is that I spend a lot of my time noodling with one question: “what else do owners need to succeed?” This gives me a strong mission to follow,…
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    dooce®

  • My ailing Butternut

    dooce
    21 Nov 2014 | 12:29 pm
    Sharing my bed with the other kid this week.
  • UGHHHHHHH

    dooce
    20 Nov 2014 | 3:21 pm
    I'm sure that there are at least fifty posts on my site with that title, but this one... this one really deserves it.
  • Gifts with a bit of loving touch

    dooce
    20 Nov 2014 | 10:57 am
    Gifts with a little more warmth than anything plastic or sporting a screen.
  • A portrait of fall

    dooce
    19 Nov 2014 | 11:24 am
    I know it's not as cold as it is in Minnesota, CAROL. But winter is over a month away and this weather is bullshit.
  • This village of ours

    dooce
    18 Nov 2014 | 1:33 pm
    "I knew I couldn’t call the police because that would frighten him even more, and so the quickest and best solution for everyone involved was to get him inside his house."
 
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    Matt Cutts: Gadgets, Google, and SEO

  • Fostering open source services

    Matt Cutts
    23 Nov 2014 | 8:12 pm
    Open source is really good at creating products. Almost any commercial software package or product like Word, Excel, Windows, or Photoshop has a great open source equivalent. However, open source has been less successful at creating services. Where’s the open source version of Google, or Facebook, or Twitter, or Gmail, or Craigslist? You could sum it up with this drawing: Now to be fair, the bottom-right box isn’t completely empty. There’s Wikipedia, which is a phenomenal service/website supported by donations. There’s Tor, where many companies and people volunteer to…
  • Powerful USB chargers

    Matt Cutts
    22 Nov 2014 | 10:14 pm
    If you’re a geek like me, there’s probably a bank or cluster of micro USB chargers somewhere in your house for recharging phones, tablets, Kindles, headphones, etc. Lately I’ve been playing with a couple USB chargers that I really like. One is a USB charger with 3.5 amp (!) output. Just for context, a typical micro USB charger might be one amp. So this adapter has the potential to charge USB devices much faster than a conventional charger. The other USB charger is 4A, but with dual micro USB plugs. So each micro USB plug puts out 2 amps–which is still quite a lot. I…
  • Improving your account security

    Matt Cutts
    21 Nov 2014 | 8:48 pm
    Every year or so, it’s worthwhile doing an audit of your online security. The most important accounts to protect are your bank accounts and your email accounts. Here are some things to consider doing: – Choose strong passwords. Just as important: don’t re-use the same password across web services. Consider using a password manager like LastPass or 1Password to generate strong, secure passwords and keep them safe. – Add two-factor authentication to your important accounts. Certainly your Gmail account, but also your Twitter account, domain registrar, etc. – Put a…
  • Open Access

    Matt Cutts
    20 Nov 2014 | 5:47 pm
    When I was in grad school in the late 90s, not very much scholarly work was on the web. I had to walk over to the campus library to access scholarly papers, and sometimes make photocopies of the physical papers I wanted. Things have gotten better, but it’s still harder to do research than it needs to be. One potential improvement is called Open Access. Open Access is about making peer-reviewed papers available online where more people can benefit from them. This topic has a lot of details and nuances that I’m going to skip over. Suffice it to say that I support Open Access…
  • Some thoughts on XOXO

    Matt Cutts
    19 Nov 2014 | 9:49 pm
    The week before XOXO, a festival dedicated to independent artists and creators, I was in Juneau, Alaska for a cruise with my wife and my parents. I got off the ship with my Dad and we walked around town. We kept walking, past the touristy stores selling smoked salmon and tanzanite. We walked for a long time, and right when we were about to turn around, I saw a small gallery/comic store called Alaska Robotics. The door had a sticker that said “We accept Bitcoin!” I thought “these are my people” and we walked in the store. Have you ever had a dream where you walked into…
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    Small Business Marketing Blog from Duct Tape Marketing

  • Weekend Favs November Twenty Two

    John Jantsch
    22 Nov 2014 | 5:44 am
    Weekend Favs November Twenty Two written by John Jantsch read more at Small Business Marketing Blog from Duct Tape Marketing My weekend blog post routine includes posting links to a handful of tools or great content I ran across during the week. I don’t go into depth about the finds, but encourage you check them out if they sound interesting. The photo in the post is a favorite for the week from Flickr or one that I took out there on the road. Trained another great group of Duct Tape Marketing Consultants this week! Good stuff I found this week: Boomerang Calendar – Google…
  • Social Media Gives Consumers and Brands a Direct Connection

    Guest Post
    21 Nov 2014 | 4:14 am
    Social Media Gives Consumers and Brands a Direct Connection written by Guest Post read more at Small Business Marketing Blog from Duct Tape Marketing It’s guest post day here at Duct Tape Marketing and today’s guest post is from Jessica Davis– Enjoy! photo credit: Matt Hamm via photopin cc Remember a time when it was not possible to share your opinions about a specific product with others because there was no outlet. Not too long ago, the consumer was considered to be at the bottom of the pyramid. There was no way to display dissatisfaction with the services received or products…
  • How and Why to Conduct a Meaningful Content Audit

    Guest Post
    20 Nov 2014 | 4:24 am
    How and Why to Conduct a Meaningful Content Audit written by Guest Post read more at Small Business Marketing Blog from Duct Tape Marketing It’s guest post day here at Duct Tape Marketing and today’s guest post is from Liz O’Neil Dennison – Enjoy! You’ve probably heard that a content audit is essential for driving engagement and revenue with content. But what is it, exactly? Why do you need one? And how do you do begin to tackle such a laborious task? Read on. What Is a Content Audit? A content audit is a qualitative analysis of all the content your company has ever published…
  • Telling the Story of You

    John Jantsch
    19 Nov 2014 | 4:01 am
    Telling the Story of You written by John Jantsch read more at Small Business Marketing Blog from Duct Tape Marketing Marketing Podcast with Judy Carter photo credit: Will Tull via photopin cc Storytelling in business is a hot topic. Marketers, leaders and brand builders are all encouraged to create narratives around their business, culture and even products. Pay attention to a great deal of the television advertising you see today and you’ll find that many possess a little story about who you could become if you only bought their product. Stories possess the power to drive emotional…
  • 3 Super Simple Ways to Make Buffer Even More Useful

    John Jantsch
    18 Nov 2014 | 3:56 am
    3 Super Simple Ways to Make Buffer Even More Useful written by John Jantsch read more at Small Business Marketing Blog from Duct Tape Marketing I’ve long since professed my love of the BufferApp. But it’s been a while since I’ve shared some of the ways I use this tool, so I thought I would add some tips today. (About a year ago my youngest daughter landed a job with Buffer – so take that for what you will as you read! – To me, it’s just another reason to love them.) Millions use Buffer for it’s core namesake functionality – buffering social…
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    KurzweilAI » News

  • Low-cost 2D-printed ‘paper electronics’

    21 Nov 2014 | 1:23 pm
    Paper-baaed touch pad on curved surface (credit: (credit: American Chemical Society) An international team of scientists has developed a fast, low-cost way of making low-cost medical electronic touch sensors by printing conductive silver nanowire inks directly on paper, using a 2D programmed printing machine. Anming Hu of the University of Tennessee Department of Mechanical, Aerospace and Biomedical Engineering and colleagues point out that paper, which is available worldwide at low cost, makes an excellent surface for lightweight, foldable “paper electronics: that could be made and used…
  • Spooky alignment of quasar axes across billions of light-years with large-scale structure

    21 Nov 2014 | 1:16 pm
    This artist’s impression shows schematically the mysterious alignments between the spin axes of quasars and the large-scale structures that they inhabit that observations with ESO’s Very Large Telescope have revealed. These alignments are over billions of light-years and are the largest known in the Universe. The large-scale structure is shown in blue and quasars are marked in white with the rotation axes of their black holes indicated with a line around them. This picture is for illustration only and does not depict the real distribution of galaxies and quasars. (Credit: ESO/M.
  • Robotic walker helps patients regain natural gait and increases productivity of physiotherapists

    21 Nov 2014 | 12:04 pm
    Robotic walker (credit: NUS) A novel robotic walker that helps patients carry out therapy sessions to regain their leg movements and natural gait has been invented by a team of researchers led by assistant professor Yu Haoyong from the National University of Singapore Department of Biomedical Engineering. Survivors of stroke or other neurological conditions such as spinal cord injuries, traumatic brain injuries and Parkinson’s disease often struggle with mobility. To regain their motor functions, these patients are required to undergo challenging physical therapy sessions. The robotic…
  • China and ‘one or two others’ can shut US electric grids and other critical infrastructure, says NSA director

    21 Nov 2014 | 6:29 am
    Sitting duck (credit: Achim Hering/Wikimedia Commons) China and “one or two others” can shut down the U.S. electric grids and other critical infrastructure and is performing electronic reconnaissance on a regular basis, said NSA director Admiral Michael Rogers, testifying Thursday (Nov. 20) at a House Select Intelligence Committee hearing on U.S. efforts to combat cybersecurity. “All of that leads me to believe it is only a matter of when, not if, we are going to see something dramatic,” he said. In cyberspace, “you can literally do almost anything you want, and…
  • Georgia Tech professor proposes another alternative to the Turing test

    19 Nov 2014 | 10:37 pm
    But would mathematician-programmer Countess Ada Lovelace have approved? Georgia Tech associate professor Mark Ried has developed a new kind of “Turing test” — a test proposed in 1950 by computing pioneer Alan Turing to determine whether a machine or computer program exhibits human-level intelligence.Most Turing test designs require a machine to engage in dialogue and convince (trick) a human judge that it is an actual person. But creating certain types of art also requires intelligence, leading Reid to consider if that approach might lead to a better gauge of whether a…
 
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    Matt Mullenweg

  • Science of Hits

    Matt
    20 Nov 2014 | 9:15 pm
    “Because the most-popular songs now stay on the charts for months, the relative value of a hit has exploded. The top 1 percent of bands and solo artists now earn 77 percent of all revenue from recorded music, media researchers report. And even though the amount of digital music sold has surged, the 10 best-selling tracks command 82 percent more of the market than they did a decade ago. The advent of do-it-yourself artists in the digital age may have grown music’s long tail, but its fat head keeps getting fatter.” — The Shazam Effect.
  • Peak Beard

    Matt
    17 Nov 2014 | 11:53 am
    “If, like me, you are a staunch pogonophile and do not believe there is a single man who cannot be improved with a beard, these are happy times indeed.” The Guardian asks Have we reached peak beard?. Also check out their take on the lumbersexual, which a closet full of plaid shirts might indicate I’m trending toward.
  • Munchery is Eating the Restaurant

    Matt
    16 Nov 2014 | 10:32 am
    Munchery is Eating the Restaurant, a cool write-up of Munchery which I’ve been a long-time fan of and is an Audrey company. Whenever I’m in SF I order from Munchery.
  • Government Going Open Source

    Matt
    15 Nov 2014 | 8:56 am
    As open source goes mainstream, institutions collaborate differently.
  • Embrace HTTPS

    Matt
    14 Nov 2014 | 2:09 pm
    9 Reasons Why News Media Sites Should Embrace HTTPS in 2015.
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    blog maverick

  • My Conversation with Business Insider about Net Neutrality

    CyberDust ID - Blogmaverick
    16 Nov 2014 | 12:13 pm
    Hey Mark, A few things that stood out from your recent string of Tweets: Yes, broadband speed and quality have gotten better. But it’s still behind the most of the developed world. We pay a lot more on average for slower speeds on average. The overarching problem is that there is no competition among ISPs. They each have monopolies where they operate. That in turn gives them little incentive to provide better service, invest in infrastructure, and so on. In fact investment in those things have declined over the last four years. Allowing ISPs to compete would be wonderful, but…
  • Another interview about streaming media from 1999

    CyberDust ID - Blogmaverick
    24 Aug 2014 | 7:35 pm
    As I clean up or find old emails for whatever reason, its always interesting to run across old interviews I did about the future of streaming media.  This interview was with Kevin Werbach who along with Esther Dyson wrote one of the leading newsletters of the time. Here is the entire email, the good and the bad At 02:48 PM 8/9/99 -0400, Kevin Werbach wrote: Thanks for your message.  I’ll definitely be in touch when I put the piece together (probably either September or October), as your perspective would be very helpful. The primary question I’m asking is how streaming video…
  • The 6 Things You Need to Know to be Great in Business

    CyberDust ID - Blogmaverick
    16 Aug 2014 | 11:22 pm
    There are no shortcuts in business.  In order to be successful there are some things that you must know.  These are not all of them by a long shot, but IMHO they are 6 of the most important   1. Know how to sell. Selling means being able to convey why your product or service, which may be you if you are looking for a job,  will make things better. Selling is never about convincing. It is always about helping. 2. Put yourself in the shoes of your customer If you know how to put the person you are dealing with in a position to succeed, you can be successful. In order to do this, you…
  • AEREO – Everything Old is New Again

    CyberDust ID - Blogmaverick
    19 Jul 2014 | 4:30 pm
    AEREO deserves a lot of credit for their effort.  It was a long and expensive shot to do what they went for.  But they went for it.  And they attempted to pivot after their SCOTUS loss. I was watching with interest, because it is something we had examined 15 years ago at Broadcast.com The technology has obviously gotten better on all sides of the equation, but sometimes a good idea is a good idea. Even if it is hard to make work.  This is from January of 2000. What is fascinating is the alliances and attempts that were being made or considered.   We also did the same kind of work to…
  • The Idiots Guide to High Frequency Trading

    CyberDust ID - Blogmaverick
    3 Apr 2014 | 1:28 pm
    First, let me say what you read here is going to be wrong in several ways.  HFT covers such a wide path of trading that different parties participate or are impacted in different ways. I wanted to put this out there as a starting point . Hopefully the comments will help further educate us all 1.  Electronic trading is part of HFT, but not all electronic trading is high frequency trading. Trading equities and other financial instruments has been around for a long time.  it is Electronic Trading that has lead to far smaller spreads and lower actual trading costs from your broker.  Very…
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    Tom Peters

  • 12 Whirlwind Days in Japan

    Tom Peters
    17 Nov 2014 | 5:35 am
    One essayist ungrammatically called Japan “uniquely unique.” Ungrammatical or not, it is perhaps accurate. In addition to jet lag following a 13+ hour flight from Boston to Tokyo, the intrigue of Japanese culture per se gripped me instantly. My wife, Susan, is a tapestry weaver, textile designer, and avid gardener, and this was her first […] The post 12 Whirlwind Days in Japan appeared first on Tom Peters.
  • Video: Tom on Mittelstand

    Cathy Mosca
    4 Nov 2014 | 10:34 am
    Tom recently had a chance to talk to CNBC on a subject that’s dear to him: Germany’s Mittelstand. Medium-sized companies that are a driving force in the economy. He’s been a champion of the phenomenon for years, so it’s good to see that others are joining the discussion. Watch the video to get in on […] The post Video: Tom on Mittelstand appeared first on Tom Peters.
  • RESPECT++ IN 140 CHARACTERS

    Tom Peters
    30 Oct 2014 | 7:57 am
    Respect is not “earned.” Respect given is automatic—though you may upon occasion discover that it was not, alas, merited. Respect is the default position. Disrespect must be earned. Respect is the greatest motivator of all. Every human being has an interesting story. You’ll find it if you give a shit. (And listen.) Everyone has a […] The post RESPECT++ IN 140 CHARACTERS appeared first on Tom Peters.
  • Guadalahara

    Cathy Mosca
    29 Oct 2014 | 9:45 am
    Tom’s chosen topic for his appearance today in Guadalahara is “Innovate … or Perish.” If you were in the audience and would like to have the slides he used, you can download the PowerPoint presentation here. There’s also a long Web-only version if you want more in-depth coverage of the topic. Enjoy! The post Guadalahara appeared first on Tom Peters.
  • The Project Leadership EXCELLENCE 42Revision, 27 October 2014

    Tom Peters
    27 Oct 2014 | 9:00 am
    What follows is a slightly revised version of the Project Leadership Excellence 42 list from my presentation last week to the PMI Leadership Institute confab. We have also attached this list in both PDF and PowerPoint formats. 1. Politics as nuisance-distraction vs. “Politics Is Life. RELISH It.” 2. IQ > EQ vs. EQ > IQ. […] The post The Project Leadership EXCELLENCE 42Revision, 27 October 2014 appeared first on Tom Peters.
 
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    Conversation Agent - Valeria Maltoni

  • Digital Prescription for Building a Good Web

    Valeria Maltoni
    23 Nov 2014 | 4:21 am
    So SnapCash is really an identity play for ads and revenue for SnapChat and an ecosystem play for large mobile base for Square. Got it. — Bradley Leimer (@leimer) November 18, 2014 Making Sense: On the one hand we move through physical spaces like drones, by force of habit; on the other, we are becoming quite good at spotting differences that create an advantage for us. So far, it is a skill we are using mostly when shopping. How to Stop Annoying Behaviors and Handle Offensive People. Adam Grant: Dan Pink, is on a mission [...]. He’s the host of a new show on National Geographic called…
  • Designing to the Way Things Are

    Valeria Maltoni
    21 Nov 2014 | 2:45 am
    The first step in a healthy process of figuring where to next is about recognizing where we are now. This means taking more of an outsider view -- because in our day-to-day we get so involved in what we do and say that we forget to notice their full impact. For example, taking the time to articulate how we work. Making it apparent by writing it down, including the connection and disc-connection points, so that we can: talk about what we want better make the/any roadblocks visible confront issues (hard on issues, soft on people) redraw, re-connect, and/or create the roadmap Change is often…
  • Fixing Broken Links

    Valeria Maltoni
    20 Nov 2014 | 5:01 pm
    “It is much harder to fix a culture that to create a culture.” Jeff Veen, Adobe/Typekit#. @veen [via] This past weekend I took a few hours to fix broken links from my earlier posts at Fast Company#, those I wrote before they moved onto a new platform and redirected the rest. It was my custom, back in 2006-2008, to write wrap posts about the same topic here from the Conversation* Agent point of view. To me the difference was using my own voice as individual on this site and using a voice more aligned with the vision of the magazine on its site. Still me in both cases, working to support…
  • Told You So

    Valeria Maltoni
    19 Nov 2014 | 5:49 pm
    A couple of stories making the rounds in the last 24 hours: Facebook is about growing its business and market value -- duh! Brands should not be sharecropping and neither should you. It's not like the about face is new, either, kind of endemic, actually. It owns your content, and it will steal your customers. Not to mention reputation tied to a closed system you do not control. Remember Beacon? Treat it as a channel and a tool to serve your needs and you have a fairly different strategy. Yes, fan-gating a like for a chance to ___ option is gone, too. Surprise, surprise. Uber continues its…
  • Decisions are a Means to an End

    Valeria Maltoni
    18 Nov 2014 | 4:15 am
    In the last couple of days I have re-read one of the books I recommended off my spring reading list: Decisive: how to Make Better Choices in Life and Work by Chip Heath & Dan Heath. My biggest takeaway from the book continues to be that decisions are a means to an end and therefore we want to become better at understanding and then trusting the process we can put in place to inform them. We are like organizations in that we also create a personal infrastructure around past decisions. If we have found to have good results by doing a certain thing a certain way, we will likely repeat it.
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    Jeffrey Zeldman Presents The Daily Report: Web Design News & Insights Since 1995

  • No Ken Do (Musketeer Barbie Saves the Prince)

    Jeffrey Zeldman
    22 Nov 2014 | 1:10 pm
    I WATCHED dozens of Barbie videos hundreds of times when my daughter was three and four years old. I can’t praise their animation, dialog, or other cinematic and literary qualities, but this I can say in their favor: every Barbie video we watched was feminist and empowering in its messaging. This was not the Barbie my girl cousin grew up with, wondering which outfit she should wear to please Ken. This Barbie kicked ass. In one video, set in 18th Century France, Barbie and her roommates overcame sexism to become Musketeers. They exposed a conspiracy, beat male villains at swordplay, and…
  • Love, Devotion, Surrender

    Jeffrey Zeldman
    20 Nov 2014 | 5:44 am
    5:00 AM at San Francisco Airport, Gate 41. A young mother, whose orange capped son sleeps profoundly across her lap, is not faring well with her mobile phone call. Her voice cuts like a razor through the somnolent silence. Mommy, mommy, mommy, mommy, mommy, mommy, mommy, mommy, she cries. I don’t speak Spanish so it is the only word of her conversation I understand. The rest of the half-asleep passengers pretend not to listen. Her nails are elaborately pretty. There is a catch in her voice. The phone call ends and she hums to her child. She is so young.
  • Tested

    Jeffrey Zeldman
    1 Nov 2014 | 9:40 am
    WE ARE at a test prep program in Flatiron, where Ava is grudgingly taking an entrance exam. Lance, the program director, is good. He guarantees he can get Ava into a good middle school if she works. She is very resistant but between us we are making some progress. The place is about as fun-oriented as it could be. Lance is a game designer and animator. He is honest and doesn’t talk down to kids. But Ava is angry. She does not want to be here. Like many artistic people, she hates doing anything that doesn’t interest her. Also she sees the prep school as evidence that her mom and I…
  • Blue Beanie Day Tees & Hoodies

    Jeffrey Zeldman
    23 Oct 2014 | 10:52 am
    JUST IN TIME for Blue Beanie Day 2014, I’ve teamed up with our friends at Cotton Bureau to bring you Blue Beanie Day Tees and Blue Beanie Day Hoodies. For sale at cost (no profit). Hurry! Only 14 days left to buy: cottonbureau.com/products/the-blue-beanie-tee The eighth annual Blue Beanie Day in support of web standards will be celebrated around the world on November 30, 2014.
  • Look Back in Angora

    Jeffrey Zeldman
    14 Oct 2014 | 10:53 am
    SATURDAY October 25 will be the 14th anniversary of my mother’s passing. Let’s honor it with this 2006 entry from the vaults of My Glamorous Life. Read: Hi, Mom!
 
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    Andy Sernovitz | Damn, I Wish I'd Thought of That!

  • Don’t let the conversations end when the campaign’s over

    Andy Sernovitz
    21 Nov 2014 | 10:00 am
    This is a post from our WordofMouth.org project. Check it out for more great word of mouth marketing tips like this every day. While one-off campaigns can be great for starting conversations, they can lose momentum quickly. Cards Against Humanity had such a promotion over the holidays. They told their fans they could pay whatever they wanted (even nothing) for the holiday edition of the game. That got a lot of people talking. But instead of letting the conversation stop after the holidays, Cards Against Humanity sent out a hilarious infographic that gave the details of the promotion. They…
  • Salesforce.com’s area dedicated to dog people

    Andy Sernovitz
    20 Nov 2014 | 10:00 am
    This is a post from The Pursuit of Happiness, a blog on happy workplaces and work culture at my company, GasPedal. Check it out for more posts like this every week. Some people at work are dog people. Some aren’t. So how do you keep everyone happy? At Salesforce.com, they have a “doggy daycare” of sorts — a large office space in their San Francisco office where dog-loving employees can bring their dogs to work each day. Dogs are confined to this area, which keeps the rest of the office quiet and dog free — and it still lets dog lovers bring their best friend to…
  • Newsletter #1015: The “Turn It Around” Issue

    Andy Sernovitz
    20 Nov 2014 | 8:00 am
    [Welcome back to the Damn, I Wish I’d Thought of That! newsletter. This is text of the great issue all of our email subscribers just received. Sign yourself up using the handy form on the right.] Negative word of mouth, PR flubs, cavities — you can’t avoid them all, but some smart companies know what to do to turn them around and earn loyal fans and customers. Here’s how: 1. Before something bad happens 2. After something bad happens 3. While something bad is happening 4. Check it out: If The Moon Were Only One Pixel 1. Before something bad happens Everyone jokes…
  • Sharon Crost on five ways Hitachi Data Systems uses big social data to map the customer journey

    Andy Sernovitz
    18 Nov 2014 | 10:00 am
    This is a post from my company, SocialMedia.org’s blog. Check it out for more profiles and stories about the people running social at really big brands. For this case study, we dove into a presentation by Hitachi Data Systems’ Senior Social Business Lead, Sharon Crost, at our Brands-Only Summit in Orlando. Like most BtoBs, Hitachi has a difficult time mapping out their buyer’s journey. “It’s really difficult to say what our buyers actually use to make a decision and how we attribute that to revenue,” says Sharon Crost, Senior Social Business Lead for…
  • Use small stuff to make big impressions

    Andy Sernovitz
    14 Nov 2014 | 10:00 am
    This is a post from our WordofMouth.org project. Check it out for more great word of mouth marketing tips like this every day. While your service and your stuff are key to giving your customers a remarkable experience, sometimes what they talk about has more to do with the little details. These small things make for great opportunities to let your personality shine through and start word of mouth. Lots of companies use coupons and discounts — but often these can benefit from a small tweak to make them worth sharing. For example, instead of just handing their customers a 10% coupon,…
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    @ProBlogger

  • 5 Quick Questions with Robert Scoble: What Makes a Great Tech Blog?

    Stacey Roberts
    23 Nov 2014 | 7:08 am
    Robert Scoble is the brains behind the blog Scobleizer (which he’s just abandoned in favour of solely microblogging on Facebook), and a well-respected authority on social media, tech, and blogging. He has worked for Microsoft, and is currently with Rackspace. We were super-fortunate to grab a few minutes of his time to answer five questions about how to make your tech blog a success. What do you think are the essentials a tech blog should have in order to be successful? Define success! For some, it might be just getting an industry discussion going. Others might want to build a media…
  • Google Introducing ‘Mobile Friendly’ Tags in Search Results and Signal It Will Start Impacting Search Rankings

    Darren Rowse
    21 Nov 2014 | 7:06 am
    Over the last couple of years any blogger who has paid attention to their analytics will know that how people are reading blogs is changing. No longer are people simply arriving on your blog on their desktop computer or laptop but on tablets, mobile phones and more. Today I took a look at the change in how people arrive on my blog (Digital Photography School) over last 3 years. I doubt the results will surprise anyone. The growth in mobile/tablet traffic has been remarkable. When I look at the last period in the chart in more detail and look at just this month (November) the trend continues…
  • Making The Impossible Possible: How I Created A Full Time Blogging Income With No Qualifications

    Guest Blogger
    20 Nov 2014 | 7:33 am
    Image via Flickr user Susy Morris This is a guest contribution from freelance writer Stacey Corrin. It was a dark day in November 2012 when I first began to blog. Rain lashed the windows of the home we’d just moved into. Removal boxes lay strewn across the floor and the cries of my newborn twins rang shrill in my ears. I felt trapped, with no escape plan. Being a new parent can do that to you. It can make you feel like the only person in the room. It can sap your energy, your personality, your identity. Yet it can also put you on a path you might never consider possible. Today I want to…
  • Where I’ll be Speaking in 2015

    Darren Rowse
    19 Nov 2014 | 2:29 pm
    I’ve had a few people asking in the last few weeks where I’ll be speaking in 2015 – I can’t believe the end of the year is so close! I love speaking and am excited by some of the opportunities next year. I hope you’ll consider joining me both here in Australia and Internationally. World Domination Summit 2013: Photo by Joshua Seaman Next year I’ll be speaking twice internationally (so far): 1. March 25-26: Social Media Marketing World in San Diego. I’m really excited to get to Social Media Marketing World this year. I’ve jealously watched it…
  • How Bloggers Can Make The Best Use Of Their 24 Hours

    Guest Blogger
    19 Nov 2014 | 7:22 am
    Image via Flickr user Thomas R Stegelmann This is a guest contribution from entrepreneur Charles Crawford. Whether your parents believe you or not, there are ways to make a living off of being a blogger. And with as many benefits that come with blogging, who wouldn’t want to at least check out this lifestyle? After all, you get to be your own boss for the most part, so you don’t have to worry about a lot of the hindrances that come with a typical 9-5. However, being a blogger isn’t all sunshine and rainbows. Instead, it’s a job where you’ll have to work hard if you expect to get…
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    Brian Solis

  • Customer Experience Happens To You Not Because of You…But It Doesn’t Have to Be That Way

    Brian Solis
    20 Nov 2014 | 8:51 am
      Earlier this year, I was asked to write the foreword for a new book focused on experience marketing and CX. The opportunity appeared while I was in the throes of researching and writing my (not yet announced) book. As hard as it was to pull away from it, I must admit that it was a welcome distraction. So, I stopped what I was doing and read the manuscript for Connect: How to Use Data and Experience Marketing to Create Lifetime Customers by Lars Birkholm Petersen, Ron Person, Christopher Nash. As usual, the deal was that I would be allowed to publish the foreword upon the release of the…
  • Spotify, Taylor Swift and The Music Industry’s Missed Opportunity

    Guest Author
    17 Nov 2014 | 7:02 am
    Guest post by Monica Corton (@momusing), Executive Vice President, Creative Affairs & Licensing Next Decade Entertainment, Inc. If you have any connection to the music biz, it’s been hard to ignore story after story of the pull out of Taylor Swift’s catalog from Spotify. As a music publisher, I have to say that I too share all of the frustrations that both Swift and Big Machine’s, Scott Borchetta have with the bad royalty structure that exists with regard to streaming music. Spotify is not alone in this and certainly not the worst player by far (some could point to Pandora for…
  • Digital Transformation is About Empathy First and Technology Second

    Brian Solis
    10 Nov 2014 | 1:47 pm
    Every day, there’s seemingly yet another disruptive trend that emerges out of nowhere which affects consumer behavior and the future of everything along with it. Many of you already follow some of the most notable trends disrupting markets today and I know you’re devising new strategies as a result in order to compete in these ever shifting markets. - Real Time - Social Media- Mobile - Sharing Economy - Peer-to-Peer Economy - Maker Economy - Internet of Things - Crowd Funding/Lending This wheel of disruption keeps turning and the Butterfly Effect it unleashes with each revolution…
  • Curate This! We are the Network Now

    Brian Solis
    5 Nov 2014 | 9:06 am
    My good friend Steve Rosenbaum released his new book, “Curate This,” to help us learn the ins and outs content curation. This is his second book and also the second time I’ve had the privilege to write his foreword. In fact, this time around, I wrote two. I’d like to share the first with you here. I’m sure I’ll publish the second at some point in the near future. and I wanted to share it with you I’ve known Steve Rosenbaum since the mid 2000s. We’ve worked together and over the years, we’ve grown to become great friends. Before we met in the real…
  • The Sophisticated Marketer’s Guide to Thought Leadership

    Brian Solis
    3 Nov 2014 | 9:03 am
    LinkedIn and I have worked on several research projects together over the years ranging from the future of Native Advertising (private) to the state of Relationship Economics.  Now, we banded together once again to explore the art and science of thought leadership. Although this time, I was on the contributing side of the research project and Jason Miller, LinkedIn’s senior manager of content marketing, was the lead. Thought leadership is one of those things that’s easier to talk about than it is to achieve. I see it as a state, something earned, and not necessarily something you…
 
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    Joho the Blog

  • APIs are magic

    davidw
    21 Nov 2014 | 6:25 am
    (This is cross-posted at Medium.) Dave Winer recalls a post of his from 2007 about an API that he’s now revived: “Because Twitter has a public API that allows anyone to add a feature, and because the NY Times offers its content as a set of feeds, I was able to whip up a connection between the two in a few hours. That’s the power of open APIs.” Ah, the power of APIs! They’re a deep magic that draws upon five skills of the Web as Mage: First, an API matters typically because some organization has decided to flip the default: it assumes data should be public unless there’s a…
  • [2b2k] Four things to learn in a learning commons

    davidw
    18 Nov 2014 | 2:10 pm
    Last night I got to give a talk at a public meeting of the Gloucester Education Foundation and the Gloucester Public School District. We talked about learning commons and libraries. It was awesome to see the way that community comports itself towards its teachers, students and librarians, and how engaged they are. Truly exceptional. Afterwards there were comments by Richard Safier (superintendent), Deborah Kelsey (director of the Sawyer Free Library), and Samantha Whitney (librarian and teacher at the high school), and then a brief workshop at the attendees tables. The attendees included…
  • “Netflix is a data hog” and other myths of Net Neutrality

    davidw
    12 Nov 2014 | 7:02 am
    Medium Backchannel just posted my piece on six myths about Net Neutrality. Here’s the opening: Netflix is a data hog “…data hogs like Netflix might need to bear some of the cost of handling heavy traffic.”?—?ABCnews That’s like saying your water utility is a water hog because you take long showers and over-water your lawn. Streaming a high-def movie does take a whole bunch of bits. But if you hadn’t gone ahead and clicked on Taken 2 [SPOILER: she’s taken again], Netflix would not have sent those bits over the Internet. So Netflix isn’t a data hog. You are.
  • The invisible change in the news

    davidw
    10 Nov 2014 | 12:55 pm
    The first chapter of Dan Gillmor‘s 2005 book, We the Media [pdf], is a terrific, brief history of journalism from the US Colonial era up through Sept. 11. And in 2014 it has a different lesson to teach us as well. Ten years later, what Dan pointed to as extraordinary is now common as air. It’s now so ordinary that it sometimes leads us to underestimate the magnitude of the change we’ve already lived through. For example, he ends that first chapter with stories from Sept. 11. News coming through email lists before it could be delivered by the mainstream press. People on the…
  • Italy’s Declaration of Internet Rights

    davidw
    8 Nov 2014 | 1:18 pm
    An ad hoc study commission of the Italian Chamber of Deputies has published a draft “Declaration of Internet Rights” that should be cause for cheers and cheer. It’s currently open for public comment at the Civici Platform — which by itself is pretty cool. TechPresident explains that this came about thanks to the initiative of the presidency of the Chamber of Deputies, a dedicated Committee of experts and members of the Parliament from the Committee on Internet Rights and Duties. The bill aims to inform the debate about online civil liberties and fundamental freedoms…
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    craigconnects

  • Everyone, thanks!

    Craig Newmark
    21 Nov 2014 | 9:01 pm
    Okay, I've gotten a big surge of support in the last few days, like fan mail and social media stuff. That means a lot to me. It all relates to two different but related areas: 1. Standing up to find trustworthy news. Like I say, a trustworthy press is the immune system of democracy. The Trust Project is the pointy end of the spear on the news professional side. Unfortunately, I might fulfill that role on the news consumer side. (I don't like that.) 2. Standing up against untrustworthy reporting attacking my community. My stuff is mostly very quiet, long term, since I'm in…
  • Tis the Season to Give Back

    Craig Newmark
    21 Nov 2014 | 10:07 am
    Folks, I believe that it's really important to give back to our communities. One way to do that is to participate in #GivingTuesday and CrowdRise's Holiday Challenge for nonprofits. I'm giving $50K to go toward the winner of the Challenge, and together, with the other donors, there will be $250K in prize money. CrowdRise has been working hard to make this Challenge and #GivingTuesday bigger then past years. One way they're doing that is by creating a Giving Tower. It's going to be a hologram tower. Each time someone donates, a brick is added to the tower. You can…
  • Why I Support Vets

    Craig Newmark
    20 Nov 2014 | 12:36 pm
    Photo Credit: U.S. Dept of Veteran Affairs Bottom line: if someone volunteers to risk taking a bullet to protect me, I should stand up and help out. This might date back to my mid-teens, towards the end of the Vietnam war. I saw returning vets getting treated without respect. At that time, I knew that was wrong, but couldn't articulate it. Maybe seven years ago, I was at a lunch, sitting next to a guy from the Iraq & Afghanistan Vets of America, IAVA.org. Finally, it clicked in, that this was the right way to support regular people who gave up a lot to protect us, and that includes…
  • A Trustworthy Press is the Immune System of Democracy

    Craig Newmark
    19 Nov 2014 | 7:15 am
    I’m a news consumer. I’m not trying to tell anybody how to do their job, or how to fix the news. I’m not in the business, and will respect professional boundaries. I just want news I can trust. I also want to help reward good, honest journalism. Since I’m not an expert, I have to defer to those who are. I’ve spent about ten years talking to a lot of these folks, and have recently joined the boards of Poynter Institute and Columbia Journalism Review, in addition to the Center for Public Integrity and Sunlight Foundation. I do feel that most journalists perform admirably, but it takes…
  • Who should learn to code? Everyone.

    Tim Heaton
    17 Nov 2014 | 8:54 am
    I believe that everyone deserves the chance to learn how to code, if that's what they want. And maybe that desire for equality's based in my nerdly values, but it's something that's important. I've been supporting Girls Who Code for some time now, and they do real good work closing the gender gap in the tech and engineering sectors. Women in tech is an effort I've been supporting pretty frequently. Speaking of coding, a coupla weeks ago Tim Heaton, who's involved in Morristown community service, sent me an email about what's going on with tech in…
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    The Dish

  • The Best Of The Dish This Weekend

    Andrew Sullivan
    23 Nov 2014 | 6:30 pm
    One reason I’ve been somewhat forgiving of Obama’s executive action on immigration deportations is that I see it as a function not of his choice to be an “imperial” president, but as a result of unprecedented Republican obstructionism. It is, for example, jaw-dropping to hear the GOP declare its shock at the president’s refusal to take into account the results of the mid-terms as a democratic norm he should respect. These are the same people who, in January and February of 2009, responded to Obama’s landslide amid a catastrophic and accelerating depression…
  • This Is The Way “Benghazi” Ends …

    Andrew Sullivan
    23 Nov 2014 | 6:02 pm
    Isn’t there something quite delicious in the House Intelligence Committee’s conclusion that there is nothing – absolutely nothing – scandalous about “Benghazi” apart from what we knew already: that the outpost was poorly protected and that the State Department had been complacent about consulate security? Even Paul Mirengoff has to take his lumps: The Committee concludes, among things, that CIA personnel on the ground in Benghazi during the attack behaved bravely and made reasonable tactical decisions that saved lives, and that the CIA received all military…
  • A Poem For Sunday

    Andrew Sullivan
    23 Nov 2014 | 5:43 pm
    “Pain I Did Not” by Sharon Olds: When my husband left, there was pain I did not feel, which those who lose the one who loves them feel. I was not driven against the grate of a mortal life, but just the slowly shut gate of preference. At times I envied them— what I saw as the honorable suffering of one who is thrown against that iron grille. I think he had come, in private, to feel he was dying, with me, and if he had what it took to rip his way out, with his teeth, then he could be born. And so he went into another world—this world, where I do not see or hear him— and my job…
  • Quote For The Day II

    Andrew Sullivan
    23 Nov 2014 | 4:51 pm
    “Maybe it’s not metaphysics. Maybe it’s existential. I’m talking about the individual US citizen’s deep fear, the same basic fear that you and I have and that everybody has except nobody ever talks about it except existentialists in convoluted French prose. Or Pascal. Our smallness, our insignificance and mortality, yours and mine, the thing that we all spend all our time not thinking about directly, that we are tiny and at the mercy of large forces and that time is always passing and that every day we’ve lost one more day that will never come back and our childhoods are over…
  • Face Of The Day

    Andrew Sullivan
    23 Nov 2014 | 4:04 pm
    Adriane Ohanesian photographed the women of Burma’s Kachin Independence Army (KIA): In Kachin State, in northern Myanmar, the anti-government sentiment runs particularly strong. In fact, rebels have a strong enough presence that control over Kachin is effectively split between the government and the Kachin Independence Army (KIA). The KIA is the last remaining major rebel group in Myanmar that has not signed a ceasefire agreement with the government. While the country at large has begun opening its doors, the government has simultaneously banned UN agencies, international NGOs, and even…
 
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    Jessica Gottlieb A Los Angeles Mom

  • Poodle Pancreatitis

    Jessica Gottlieb
    20 Nov 2014 | 9:51 am
    I missed everything Tuesday. I missed most of the afternoon Sunday, all of Monday and everything Tuesday too. I missed the LA Auto Show and I missed driving Toyota’s Mirai, the new Fuel Cell Vehicle. I missed out on participating in my own life because I have a poodle with pancreatitis. In case you were wondering pancreatitis is diagnosed with four hours spent at the vet’s office and $387. Something happens to make it work out that way but I’m not sure what the actual logistics to it are nor do I much care. Junior has been moaning, crying and not eating. He wouldn’t…
  • Visiting Los Angeles With Kids

    Jessica Gottlieb
    18 Nov 2014 | 10:36 am
    There are a million travel articles about how to visit Los Angeles with kids and they will tell you a lot of the same things. Go to Disneyland, go to the beach, try the El Capitan. I have been able to be Disneyland free for at least the past five years, “go to the beach” is lame, it’s like someone just points West and says, “go”, and though the El Capitan is a great place to see a movie, it’s what you do before and after that matters. I’ve partnered with Expedia to bring you some tips for visiting Los Angeles with your family. Los Angeles is the…
  • The LA Auto Show is Coming

    Jessica Gottlieb
    13 Nov 2014 | 12:00 pm
    Remember a couple of days ago when I was all, “I love my kids and I want to spend time with them.”? Well, that was a few days ago & I still love my kids but I am about to abandon them for three days and I’m totally okay with that. It’s AUTO SHOW TIME. I’m starting to get emails from the manufacturers about parties, press conferences and off sites and I realize that I’m looking forward to this more than I ought to. The folks at Lexus won’t tell me what they’re unveiling but I did recently attend an event where I got to sit in and start the…
  • George W Bush Reminisces About His Father and Drunk Driving

    Jessica Gottlieb
    11 Nov 2014 | 9:49 am
    This morning I was making Alexander breakfast and listening to NPR. George W Bush was giving an interview about the biography he wrote about his father. I was intrigued and every time W talks I like to listen. I want to know what made Reagan call him The Idiot Son (besides the obvious). Today he proved himself to be absolutely moronic and more than a little dangerous (but as it’s Veterans Day we already knew that about him). If you’re not interested in listening to the full eight minutes you can begin around the 3:30 mark. This is where W talks about his “youthful…
  • Saying Yes to Motherhood With Teens

    Jessica Gottlieb
    10 Nov 2014 | 11:12 pm
    It’s 11pm and I’m finally getting around to posting something. I haven’t had time for much lately. We had Jane’s birthday and then Jane’s birthday party complete with her dad not singing and strumming a guitar. We’ve celebrated my Mom and Stepfather’s Birthdays, we’ve taken ISEE’s and completed the first three high school applications for Alexander. Jane’s volleyball season and Alexander’s football seasons are wrapped up and we’re looking tennis and basketball square in the time consuming eye. During all of this…
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    Andrew Grumet's Weblog

  • Dentist chair conversations

    admin
    21 Nov 2014 | 6:44 am
    I paid a visit to my dentist this week.  As I sat in the chair having a sort of half-conversation with her, tubes and picks sticking out of my mouth, it struck me how both unusual and applicable dentist chair conversations are.  Have you ever had a conversation where you’re completely engaged with an idea and just can’t get the words out fast enough, your mind constantly racing ahead?  The pitfall in these situations is that you don’t take the time to listen, appreciate and react to the ideas of the person you’re conversing with.  The conversation may become…
  • Pastry

    admin
    19 Oct 2014 | 8:59 pm
    Late this week I tried my hand at pastry, using Weekend Bakery’s croissant dough recipe.  It’s a multi-day process.  Thursday night I mixed the dough, the standard flour-water-yeast-salt components that make up all yeast-leavened breads, plus some milk and butter. Also Thursday, I created the butter sheet.   The goal is to create a square of butter about a half cm thick and 17 cm on a side.  You can actually buy these pre-made — see here or search for “butter sheets”.  But they’re not hard to make.  There are lots of blog posts and videos about how…
  • Good UX

    admin
    15 Oct 2014 | 10:08 pm
    Here are two recent experiences I had with software, that represent a great experience I’d like to see more of: Uber mobile app: When entering your credit card information, instead of manually typing in the number, you take a picture of your credit card, and the app OCRs it from the image. Fitbit Aria: When setting up the scale, software running your computer locates the scale’s wi-fi server, connects to it and automatically syncs your settings, including your home wi-fi login.  No fiddling around tapping things into a keypad on the scale. Bravo, and encore!  
  • Flan

    admin
    12 Oct 2014 | 12:59 pm
    I made my first flan this weekend — from Jaques Pepin’s recipe.  It’s been in the fridge overnight.  The big unmolding happens soon!  I’ll post a follow-up picture when that happens. In other news, I’ve updated the software that runs this blog and am testing it out.  I’m also pondering, given the alternative places to write and reach people on the web, how I want to engage going forward.  I definitely want to continue to write on my own domain.  WordPress was a great tool for that ten years ago.  Is it the best tool for that now?   We shall see.
  • Bitcoin

    admin
    25 Mar 2013 | 10:45 pm
    I spent some time last night wrapping my head around how bitcoin works.  Here’s a summary that I wrote up for a friend earlier today. The summary is a bit on the technical side. The heart of the system is a global, public ledger listing all transactions on the network.  The ledger is called the “block chain”, a term derived from the underlying tech. Balances are held by ‘addresses’ which function much the same way as bank accounts. An “address” is the public side of a public key / private key pair. Transactions can only be initiated by the…
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    Betsy Devine: Funny ha-ha and/or funny peculiar

  • Technology and progress: Past and present

    Betsy Devine
    29 Oct 2014 | 9:30 pm
    My mother could remember when an electric iron and central heating were huge tech novelties. I can remember my first pocket calculator (which cost a fortune!), and I remember how long I kept using my CRC handbook and sliderule anyway, not the new toy. I remember my first VHS, the freedom of time-shifting or just re-watching good movies. And my first home computer! But all those were commonplace items to my two daughters. My daughters remember a time before there was an Internet; a time before smartphones, Siri, ubiquitous constant connection via the “cloud.” To their children, all…
  • Non-apology apology Bingo, with a hat tip to #DonaldSterling

    Betsy Devine
    26 Apr 2014 | 8:53 pm
    Coming soon to a PR debacle near you… the carefully crafted non-apology apology that admits no guilt or liability for whatever it is that upset a whole lot of people but instead works to show the (alleged) wrongdoer is in fact the victim here, and anybody who judges said (alleged) wrongdoer is just as bad as the whistleblower(s) who made (alleged) misdeeds public. Or, in other words, worse than H****r. Note the Creative Commons license that I pasted right on the bingo card, Internet people. Because it is mine and I made it. So don’t you go be worse than H****r because I am…
  • Wonderful world

    Betsy Devine
    6 Mar 2014 | 9:42 pm
    What a Wonderful World, sung by Eva Cassidy When I listen to Eva Cassidy, already diagnosed with the metastatic cancer that would be killing her, singing at her final concert “What a Wonderful World,” my tears are not so much, or at least not only for young Eva Cassidy, but for all of us, so ready to love and create and be generous (if our early lives don’t take those hopes out of our hearts) but instead shunted off into harder and lesser and more painful lives than our childhoods imagined. And even then, our hearts keep hoping and dreaming of love and fulfillment. They keep…
  • What hath Twitter wrought?

    Betsy Devine
    5 Sep 2013 | 7:37 am
    What hath Twitter wrought?, a photo by betsythedevine on Flickr. Last week, Frank Wilczek asked Twitter if anybody knew the name of a very odd object (we posted a video) seen at Susty’s Restaurant in Northwood, NH. Richard Askew (@ricaskew) not only knew the answer to Frank’s question, he also knew where Frank could buy kinetic forks for himself! @FrankWilczek Kinetic Fork www.littlegorgeousthings.com/kifobasc.html Yesterday, Frank’s new toys arrived in the mail and this morning we took even more videos because … surely Twitter is waiting to see what we found!
  • Life in the Frank Wilczek lane

    Betsy Devine
    15 Aug 2013 | 3:09 pm
    Life in the Frank Wilczek lane, a photo by betsythedevine on Flickr. Doing my bit to get this little vignette added some day to a learned biography of Frank Wilczek: Me: (sitting in living room, working on Internet stuff) (silence) Frank: (sitting on porch, working on physics stuff) (laughing and laughing) Me: (still in living room, not working) What? Oo, what’s funny, what? Frank: (walking in from porch with open book in his hand, full of enthusiasm) It’s a great quote from Wittgenstein! And if you didn’t know yet that he’s a sweet-natured guy, he agreeably posed for…
 
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    inessential.com

  • Tom on Extensions and Sharing Data

    21 Nov 2014 | 10:00 am
    Here’s how you share data between iOS apps and app extensions.
  • Le Guin

    21 Nov 2014 | 9:57 am
    Mom sent me a link to the video of Ursula K. Le Guin’s short talk at the National Book Awards. It’s great.
  • Tumult Wow

    20 Nov 2014 | 1:17 pm
    Sure, the Tumult folks are pals. But check out the video for Tumult Hype Professional.
  • In Which Omni Is Compared to Taylor Swift

    19 Nov 2014 | 12:24 pm
    Ben Thompson: Differentiation and Value Capture in the Internet Age.
  • Allen on WebKit

    18 Nov 2014 | 2:32 pm
    Allen Pike did a great talk at Xcoders a few months ago on embedding WebKit in iOS apps — and it’s up on Vimeo.
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    Rex Hammock's RexBlog.com

  • A Clearer View of the Future of Google Glass

    Rex Hammock
    15 Nov 2014 | 12:32 pm
    (See Update) November 14, 2014, via Reuters: Of 16 Glass app makers contacted by Reuters, nine said that they had stopped work on their projects or abandoned them, mostly because of the lack of customers or limitations of the device. Three more have switched to developing for business, leaving behind consumer projects. Last year, I observed in a post–one that included an email exchange  with Don Norman of Nielson-Norman and author of The Design of Everyday Things–that I believed the product release of Google Glass was bungled by Google. As much as I’m a fan and customer of…
  • For Long Time Readers of RexBlog, a Flying Car Video

    Rex Hammock
    3 Nov 2014 | 6:26 pm
    First: A Flashback to the year 2006 when I blogged all year about stories I’d see regarding flying cars. The truth is, you could pick out any year and read just as many articles about people who are going to start having a commercial version of a flying car next July. For some reason, next July is always far enough in the future so reporters will forget to check back in. Anyway, I just saw this and thought it was too 2006 to pass up. At least they didn’t claim it would be available next July. Related posts: The flying car I don’t expect to see anytime soon (but I keep…
  • Review: The Podcast “Serial”

    Rex Hammock
    3 Nov 2014 | 11:40 am
    This is the post where I am officially joining the quickly-expanding fan club of Serial (Website | iTunes), the new audio podcast spin-off from Ira Glass’s public radio program, This American Life. It joins Chicago’s WBEZ’s incredible lineup of podcasts that are setting a high standard for the production and distribution of media that are opening eyes (but more importantly, ears) for a coming revival of audio programming unmatched since the golden age of radio (which I’m not old enough to recall personally, despite rumors to the contrary). Unlike This American…
  • Top Ten List of Reasons to Ignore Top 10 List Blog Posts

    Rex Hammock
    1 Nov 2014 | 2:38 pm
    Here are the top ten reasons to avoid blog posts that are top ten lists. They are boring and repetitive.. They are obvious. No one reads past #3. So bloggers make up stuff from 5-10. Moses. Now there was a great list writer. A grocery shopping list is good to have. A grocery shopping list is good to have. Did you notice #7 repeated #6? No one else noticed it. They are boring and repetitive. Related posts: Scoble’s A-List Top one list of list-thing I always look forward to this time of year Lists of blog lists
  • When Responsive Design Meets SEO Headline Writing

    Rex Hammock
    1 Nov 2014 | 7:06 am
    In the olden days of print, there was a term called “orphan ” that referred to a headline or paragraph with a lonely word dangling on a line by itself. The copy editor would rewrite it “to get rid of the orphan.” (For a discussion of widows and orphans, see: http://www.magazinedesigning.com.) Today, when we all read our news on various size screens on sites with “responsive design,” the headline length is not measured by “size” but by its relationship to the width of a container that I’ll just call “a column” (i.e., 100% of…
 
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    Berkeley Blog

  • It's Not About Who Owns Your Data. It's What They Do With It.

    Berkeley Blog
    21 Nov 2014 | 5:44 pm
    Andreas Weigand, the guy who built Amazon’s cloud services and is now an itinerant speaker in academic environments, sports a maniacal smile, as if he’d just discovered the algorithm that led to the creation of the universe. Discovery is his modus operandi, as if the world were made for his personal exploration. The other day, at his invitation, I sat in on the final session of his course on the Social Data Revolution, held at UC Berkeley’s Graduate School of Information, or the iSchool. This session was about data ownership and featured Pete Warden, founder of JetPack and someone who…
  • Reinventing Oneself

    Berkeley Blog
    3 Nov 2014 | 1:04 pm
    If corporations are given the status of personhood – at least under the law – then people can also act as if they are corporations. The other day at yet another conference – it’s the season for convening after summer’s respite – I met a friend who has reinvented herself. She now does x instead of y, which she did when I talked to her a couple of years ago, and in a way she reminded me of IBM, which used to sell computers and now hawks services and which continues to morph as CEOs come and go. It’s disconcerting for flagpoles like myself, who stake an ideological ground base and…
  • Media is Messy

    Berkeley Blog
    12 Oct 2014 | 8:51 pm
    Just back from the Berkeley Cybersalon on the Media Makeover, which I moderated with a panel of five seasoned journalists exploring new territory on the Internet. Dan Gillmor, who first envisaged citizen journalism before the advent of smartphones and tweets, said media is in a messy period. His main worry is that the monopoly carriers, like Comcast, will determine who gets quick access or not, and as for the ability to find interesting stuff that's not driven by advertising, "We've already given it all away to Google." More upbeat were the younger journos:  Jennifer 8…
  • Why Should Cyclists Spin? Let Me Count the Ways.

    Berkeley Blog
    30 Sep 2014 | 1:44 pm
    At Happy Hour Fitness in Berkeley, where I take spinning class once a week, I’m the only spinner who regularly rides a bicycle -- both for commuting, because I don’t have a car, and recreation, because I love riding around the East Bay hills. Most of the people in my class don’t even have a bicycle, or if they do, prefer to spin indoors on a faux cycle that goes nowhere. At the same time, most cyclists I know wouldn’t be caught dead in a spinning class unless it’s raining, which it doesn’t seem to do anymore in California. But cyclists could really benefit from spinning class, as…
  • iPhone 6 versus Knausgaard 3

    Berkeley Blog
    23 Sep 2014 | 12:05 pm
    While most of my friends are hungering to get their hands on the iPhone 6, I'm champing at the bit to secure an English translation of Karl Ove Knausgaard's volume 3, the latest book translated from the Norweigian in this author's six-volume epic, My Struggle. If I were his publisher, I'd rename the title Hitler ruined for everyone My Hunger for Life because this memoir by the stay-at-home father of four describes every quotidian moment of life, from changing diapers filled with excrement to cooking a meal of fish and potatoes, as if it were a testament to his need to feel…
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    GerardMcLean.com

  • Rejection letter reply

    Gerard McLean
    21 Nov 2014 | 1:45 pm
    Hey guys, Thank you for actually sending me a rejection letter. In a world where the default is just to do nothing, you have already risen up to the 1% of desirable companies to work for. I get why you may have rejected my application in that you are able to attract a large number […]
  • What do you see

    Gerard McLean
    6 Oct 2014 | 7:04 am
    What do you see in the photo above? Look very closely before you answer. Really, really closely. Before I tell you what I see, I need to share a short story with you. When my son was young, Saturday was grocery-shopping day. My job was to occupy him for the hour or so it took […]
  • Basic ad fail

    Gerard McLean
    5 Jun 2014 | 11:03 am
    I clicked on a link on the Pure WOW newsletter (don’t judge!) that led me to an ad for a Coach leather briefcase here. “Wow, I want that,” I thought to myself. So I clicked on the ad, which brought me to this page on coach.com. After scrolling around a bit on the collection of […]
  • Your most impressive accomplishment

    Gerard McLean
    22 Feb 2014 | 10:58 am
    As I dig deeper into the world of job-hunting tools on the internet, I ran across the site angel.co. I’ve known it was there for some time, so this is actually a rediscovery by accident. I was following the fox hole that Secret built and decided to apply for their open Community Manager job. One […]
  • The most interesting thing about you — tl;dr

    Gerard McLean
    19 Jan 2014 | 8:06 am
    “I chase stray turkeys, catch them and bring them back to their pens,” he answered in the most matter-of-fact way to one of my interview questions. I hired him immediately to assemble and repair bikes, a job he then held for four years, even through the winter. I figured anyone willing to chase down turkeys […]
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