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  • If You Want to Change Your Life You Should Fire Your Friends

    Jessica Gottlieb A Los Angeles Mom
    Jessica Gottlieb
    20 May 2015 | 7:57 pm
    I’m done blogging. I’m not blogging again. Blogging is not my job and to every email pitching something that all the mommies will always love I simply reply, “I’m not a blogger anymore please take me off your list.” That felt really great. I like the idea of not being on every publicist’s email list. My peers have stopped blogging. Most of the women I worked with at Momversation have shuttered their sites. PhD In Parenting is no more and I’m not even sure what’s happening with other large sites. Most have been sold or are dying slow deaths. At…
  • PacMan Eats Up Amazon’s Home Page

    RexBlog.com
    Rex Hammock
    22 May 2015 | 11:47 am
    Earlier this year, I noted a new design of Wired.com that supports “takeover” ads. These are not pop-over or pop-up ads that you can click an “x” to remove. These are ads that are actually a part of the background or are, in some graphical and often animated way, an actual element of the page. Today, I thought I saw Amazon come as close as I’ve seen it come to promoting a product using a takeover approach (that wasn’t a letter from Jeff Bezzos). However, upon looking at it more closely, I realized it was a standard size Amazon uses — a…
  • What matters

    gapingvoid
    Valerie Urso
    8 May 2015 | 8:04 am
    visit the store   Every now and then I’ll do a pretty random cartoon. This one qualifies. I’ve always liked churches and religious architecture in general. They’re like constant spiritual reminders in the landscape. Here, I imagined being somewhere in the desert in the Levant. Maybe Israel or Syria or even further East, and seeing an ancient holy place… A church, mosque or temple of some sort. The actual religion doesn’t matter so much. What matters is the “A-Ha!”.
  • How to Be Not-Scary

    Scott Adams Blog
    21 May 2015 | 10:33 am
    An hour ago I heard my assistant opening a door that I happened to be standing near. It was one of those situations likely to scare the heck out of her. I was an adult male in an unexpected place, and too close. As a courtesy, I decided to act as not-scary as possible. I had about one second to plan my presentation.A second wasn’t long enough. She won’t need any coffee today.But in that one second I went through a lot of possible options for my posture, demeanor, and general expression. The way I approached the role was to go all statue-like as soon as the door opened. No sudden motions.
  • But do you want to get better?

    Seth Godin's Blog on marketing, tribes and respect
    Seth Godin
    23 May 2015 | 2:17 am
    It seems like a stupid question. Of course we want our organization, our work and our health to improve. But often, we don't. Better means change and change means risk and risk means fear. So the organization is filled with people who have been punished when they try to make things better, because the boss is afraid. And so the patient gets the prescription but doesn't actually take all the meds. And the bureaucrat feigns helplessness because it's easier to shrug than it is to care. There are countless ways to listen, to engage with users, to learn and to improve, but before you or your…
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    Scripting News

  • What would you do if you woke up one morning and there was no Internet?

    20 May 2015 | 5:08 am
    I asked this question on Facebook and Twitter, and got a variety of answers. I think there are two "correct" answers. Start a new Internet. Cry. Most people say they would go do normal things that don't involve the Internet, but I think the world would take a long time to adjust. Many of us remember a world without the Internet, but we don't remember a world without the Internet that used to have the Internet. A question that reveals the problem is to wonder what would happen if you woke up one morning and found there was no electricity. Not much would happen in the world as it's currently…
  • Apple Watch liveblog notes

    17 May 2015 | 6:53 am
    I got my Apple Watch last week, and I pretty much love it. I started taking notes on my exploration on my liveblog, which was designed for cumulative projects like this one. I wanted to be sure readers of Scripting News know about this. http://liveblog.co/users/davewiner/2015/05/13/appleWatchNotes.html Your comments and suggestions are welcome.
  • Something doesn't smell right about the rush to "deprecate" HTTP

    17 May 2015 | 6:45 am
    Google and Mozilla and others want force all non-HTTPS sites to become HTTPS. And while the name HTTPS sounds a lot like HTTP, it's actually a lot more complex and fraught with problems. If what they want to do ever happens, much of the independent web will disappear. First, the problem as I understand it, is that some ISPs are gathering data about the content flowing through their routers, inserting ads and cookies and otherwise modifying content. I agree of course that this is a bad thing. Going to HTTPS does not get rid of all possible ways of snooping and modifying content. A toolbar, for…
  • How to have a future

    13 May 2015 | 9:50 am
    The journalism world is having a fit of depression today as they learn that their something they've actually known for years: their distribution system is owned by the tech industry. There is a solution. Start rebuilding your distribution system around the Internet. Instead of broadcasting to an audience, feed a community back to itself. Be distributors. Understand that you are not making the news. Your job always has been distribution. It's all about your rolodex Gather all the rolodexes in your organization and merge them into a database. Be sure you have a field in your database called…
  • Facebook's Instant Articles

    13 May 2015 | 3:53 am
    A few items related to Facebook's Instant Articles announcement that came in the middle of the night. I was briefed on this project last summer. It got me interested in the Facebook API. People who use Facebook want this. How do I know? When I post full text of stories on FB they read it and comment. When I post a link to my blog post, they still comment, but very often without having read the piece. As a writer I can only take so much of this! The place to put this functionality is in the CMS or blogging tools. If I were FB, I would have gone to the toolmakers first. Made sure there was…
 
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    Guy Kawasaki

  • Startups: How to Do a Pre-Mortem (and Prevent a Post-Mortem)

    Guy Kawasaki
    20 May 2015 | 9:42 am
    Doctors conduct postmortems to figure why people died. They do this to solve a crime, prevent the death of others, and satisfy curiosity. However, once somebody dies, it’s too late to help him. Entrepreneurs and their investors also often analyze why a product, service, or company died—especially if it’s someone else’s company. And, as in the case of dead people, a postmortem is too late to do much good for a defunct product, service, or company. Enter the concept of premortems, coined by Gary Klein, chief scientist of Klein Associates, and author of Sources of Power: How People Make…
  • Photos from the May 2015 Maker Faire in San Mateo California

    Guy Kawasaki
    18 May 2015 | 2:27 pm
    The post Photos from the May 2015 Maker Faire in San Mateo California appeared first on Guy Kawasaki.
  • The Art of the Panel

    Guy Kawasaki
    11 May 2015 | 8:50 am
    At any conference, there are ten times more panelists than there are keynote speakers, so the odds are higher that you’re on a panel than giving a keynote speech. Therefore, rocking a panel is an important skill for evangelists, too. A panel looks easy. There are four or five other people on it, and it lasts only sixty minutes. How hard could it be? Herein lies the problem: because everyone thinks a panel is short and easy, no one prepares for it. In reality, a panel is harder than an individual speech because you cannot control a panel like your own keynote speech, and you get much less…
  • Must Do: Intern Like a Rock Star

    Guy Kawasaki
    5 May 2015 | 6:00 am
    This is a reprint from Leave Your Mark: Land Your Dream Job. Kill it in Your Career. Rock Social Media. By Aliza Licht. I’m publishing it because many students are about to begin their summer internships, and I want them to have the most valuable experience possible.   When you enter a real work environment for the first time, especially as a college student starting an internship, remember why you want to be there: First and foremost, to learn real marketable skills that can enhance your resumé and to secure a strong referral from your supervisor. You do not go about getting these…
  • How to Launch (And Why Scaling Doesn’t Matter)

    Guy Kawasaki
    4 May 2015 | 6:06 am
    In the early days of starting up, the ability to scale is overrated. “Scale,” in case you haven’t heard the term, refers to the concept that there are processes in place that are fast, cheap, and repeatable because there will soon be millions of customers who generate billions of dollars of revenue. For example, if Pierre Omidyar had to test every used printer offered for sale, eBay couldn’t scale. If Marc Benioff had to make every sales call, Salesforce.com couldn’t scale. If James Hong’s parents had to check every picture to see if it was porn, Hot or Not couldn’t scale.
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    Seth Godin's Blog on marketing, tribes and respect

  • But do you want to get better?

    Seth Godin
    23 May 2015 | 2:17 am
    It seems like a stupid question. Of course we want our organization, our work and our health to improve. But often, we don't. Better means change and change means risk and risk means fear. So the organization is filled with people who have been punished when they try to make things better, because the boss is afraid. And so the patient gets the prescription but doesn't actually take all the meds. And the bureaucrat feigns helplessness because it's easier to shrug than it is to care. There are countless ways to listen, to engage with users, to learn and to improve, but before you or your…
  • How to win an argument with a scientist

    Seth Godin
    22 May 2015 | 2:00 am
    Make better science. The act of being a scientist is the commitment to the scientific method, a series of hypotheses, tests and re-evaluations. When you make better science, the scientist's previous opinion doesn't matter, not if she's being a scientist. On the other hand, if you want to win an argument with someone who refuses to act like a scientist, making better science isn't going to help you very much. The person you're arguing with now (who might be a scientist during the day, even, but is merely being a person right now) is not going to be swayed from a firmly held opinion by your…
  • You don't know Lefsetz?

    Seth Godin
    21 May 2015 | 2:07 am
    I was talking to someone dedicating his career to working in newspapers. I asked him what he thought of the work of Jeff Jarvis. He had no idea what I was talking about. I met a musician the other day, and asked her how her work without a label was going, and referenced something by Bob Lefsetz. She didn't know who I meant. The last time I was at an event for librarians, I mentioned Maria Popova. Blank stares. A podcaster asked me a question, and I wondered if he admired the path Krista Tippett had taken. He had no clue. A colleague was explaining his work in memetics to me. I asked about…
  • Is it meeting your needs…

    Seth Godin
    20 May 2015 | 2:18 am
    Or merely creating new wants? Is it honoring your time or squandering your time? Is it connecting you with those you care about, or separating you from them? Is it exposing you or giving you a place to hide? Is it important, or only urgent? Is it right, or simply convenient? Is it making things better, or merely more pressing? Is it leveraging your work or wasting it? What is it for?        
  • Unlimited scale

    Seth Godin
    19 May 2015 | 2:50 am
    Nothing grows to infinity. Certainly no project or business or idea. And saying, "as many as possible," implies a series of trade-offs that you're probably not actually interested in making. One of the most important decisions we make is almost always made without thought, without discussion: "How big do you want this to be?" It's a question that always gets in the way of, "How good do you want this to be?"        
 
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    kottke.org

  • Movie intro megamix

    Jason Kottke
    22 May 2015 | 12:32 pm
    A cleverly constructed mashup of all the major Hollywood studio intros -- MGM's roaring lion, Disney's castle, Paramount's flying stars, Miramax's skyline -- into one mega-intro. (via @pieratt) Tags: movies   remix   video
  • Some weekend reading from David Foster Wallace

    Jason Kottke
    22 May 2015 | 11:16 am
    The Atlantic has republished and reformatted Host by David Foster Wallace on their website. Originally published in 2005, Host was a profile of talk radio host John Ziegler and contained several layers of footnotes, which are beautifully handled in this new online version. The Nick Berg beheading and its Internet video compose what is known around KFI as a "Monster," meaning a story that has both high news value and tremendous emotional voltage. As is SOP in political talk radio, the emotions most readily accessed are anger, outrage, indignation, fear, despair, disgust, contempt, and a…
  • Ten things you'll learn in your first year of business school

    Jason Kottke
    22 May 2015 | 10:20 am
    I've never had the desire to go to business school or get an MBA, but I found this post by Ellen Chisa about what she learned during her first year at Harvard Business School fascinating. It almost nearly sort of makes me want to think about maybe applying to business school. People often know what they're good at (it got them where they are!) Unfortunately, things won't always go well in your career. How you react and recover impacts everyone around you. One of the best things I did this year was answering these two questions honestly, for myself: What is my worst self? When does my worst…
  • A Very Murray Christmas

    Jason Kottke
    22 May 2015 | 9:43 am
    Netflix will air a Christmas special starring Bill Murray and directed by Sofia Coppola. That is an amazing collection of proper nouns all together in the same sentence. Written by Sofia Coppola, Bill Murray and Mitch Glazer and directed by Sofia Coppola, A Very Murray Christmas is described as an homage to the classic variety show featuring Bill Murray playing himself, as he worries no one will show up to his TV show due to a terrible snow storm in New York City. Through luck and perseverance, guests arrive at the Carlyle hotel to help him; dancing and singing in holiday spirit. (via several…
  • Expensive wine is for suckers

    Jason Kottke
    21 May 2015 | 1:53 pm
    Wine ratings are all over the place, particularly when price enters the picture. This video explains that the most expensive wine is not always the best tasting wine, but you might prefer it anyway. (via @riondotnu) Tags: economics   food   video   wine
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    Daring Fireball

  • Direct Mail for OS X

    John Gruber
    23 May 2015 | 1:10 pm
    My thanks to Direct Mail for sponsoring this week’s DF RSS feed. Direct Mail is a fully native Mac app for creating, sending, and tracking email marketing campaigns. Their brand-new version 4.0 wraps powerful new features like cloud syncing, collaboration, and autoresponders in an easy-to-use interface. Direct Mail has a slew of great templates, drag and drop design tools, and more. Check out their website to learn more and see just how easy it is to use, and get started today by downloading the app for free.  ★ 
  • ★ On the Apple Watch Interaction Model and the Digital Crown

    John Gruber
    21 May 2015 | 7:47 am
    Steven Berlin Johnson finds the digital crown button convoluted: If you press this button, these are the potential events that will transpire on your Watch’s screen: You’ll be taken to the “watch face” view. You’ll be taken to the “home screen” app view. You’ll stay in the “home screen” view, but it will re-center on the “watch face” app. You’ll move from a detailed view of a notification back to the notifications summary. His proposed solution: Fortunately there is an easy fix for this confusion, which is to streamline the Digital Crown so that it focuses…
  • Apple Watch and Continuous Computing

    John Gruber
    21 May 2015 | 6:59 am
    Ben Thompson: That’s not to claim ignorance: I read voraciously, including reviews, talk to as many “normal” people as I can in as many places as I can, and think I have a sense for where various categories are at. And given that, I can’t quite shake the feeling that the Apple Watch is being serially underestimated. Nor, I think, is the long term threat to Apple’s position being fully appreciated.  ★ 
  • Marco Arment Bought a New MacBook

    John Gruber
    21 May 2015 | 6:09 am
    Marco Arment: I hate typing on it, I hate the trackpad, it’s slower than I expected, the screen is noticeably blurry from non-native scaling to get reasonable screen space, and I don’t even find it very comfortable to use in my lap because it’s too small. I hate returning things, but I’m returning this. Wish he’d just tell us what he really thinks instead of always sugarcoating it like this.  ★ 
  • Keith Olbermann: A David Letterman Appreciation

    John Gruber
    20 May 2015 | 6:15 pm
    Keith Olbermann: So I’m a fan on all levels, and on the human one, I’d like to be as decent a man as Dave, if-or-when I grow up. Which leaves me with only one complaint: that after May 20th he’s not doing the show any more. It really is like watching Babe Ruth quit.  ★ 
 
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    Web Strategy by Jeremiah Owyang | Digital Business

  • Can Tech Startups Appease Wall Street While Achieving Their Social Mission?

    jeremiah_owyang
    15 May 2015 | 5:05 am
    Etsy, at least, may have figured it out. (This post originally appeared on Fast Company) Over the last decade, there’s been an outpouring of concern about how Facebook, Google, and other Internet companies treat their user data. This concern continues as the next generation of startups, like Uber, Lyft, Homejoy, and Postmates, are being taken to court by people like worker rights lawyer Liss-Riordan, who formerly filed class-action lawsuits on behalf of truck drivers, waiters, delivery men, cable installers, and call center workers. Industry leaders have written about how these…
  • How the Collaborative Economy is impacting the Energy Sector

    jeremiah_owyang
    23 Apr 2015 | 6:59 am
    If you’re reading this, you already know how important energy is to us. It powers our transportation, logistics, industry, agriculture, homes, and the very digital device you’re using now. What’s the Collaborative Economy? An economic model where technologies enable people to get what they need from each other –rather than from centralized institutions. This has impacted cars, hotels, banks, retailers, manufactures, and more. How is the Energy Sector being impacted by the Collaborative Economy? You might be amazed to learn that P2P lending, Makers, and sharing are causing some…
  • The Six Strategies Companies Can Take to Lead the Collaborative Economy

    jeremiah_owyang
    20 Apr 2015 | 6:18 am
    Above image: The Collaborative Economy marketplaces in the maker movement, sharing economy, p2p lending are quickly on the rise First, let’s define what we’re talking about. Like Craigslist or eBay, we’re seeing new marketplaces emerge with a more concentrated focus on every business.  They offer features that enable sellers to offer their ware, and buyers to offer bids, exchange of information, goods, and currency in both directions. Every stock exchange is set up in this manner, allowing for efficient trade, despite location and time differences.   [Definition of a two sided…
  • Meet the Empowered People

    jeremiah_owyang
    9 Apr 2015 | 5:48 am
    They have new powers. They are backed by powerful companies. And they are starting to organize. No, I’m not talking about the latest episode of Heroes. I’m talking about the people formerly known as your customers. You may be asking, “What powers do they have? Who gave those powers to them? What are they going to do together?” I’ll be glad answer that. They are powerful. They have new powers, and you can see a collection of stats, that enable them the ability to get all the information they need about you in real time using social networks, mobile devices, and the internet.
  • 8 Brands Using the Collaborative Economy to Market with the Crowd

    jeremiah_owyang
    2 Apr 2015 | 6:22 am
    It pays to share, as the crowd shares your brand for you. Marketers first adopted the internet and then social media. The next digital phase is the Collaborative Economy. What’s that? If you’ve heard of Airbnb, Uber, Lyft, Kickstarter, Indiegogo, and the Maker Movement, this is the Collaborative Economy. Just as social media enabled people to create media and then share media, in this next phase, the Collaborative Economy enables people to create their own physical goods as well as share their existing physical goods. In both of these examples, they are using digital technologies to make…
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    Scott Adams Blog

  • How to Be Not-Scary

    21 May 2015 | 10:33 am
    An hour ago I heard my assistant opening a door that I happened to be standing near. It was one of those situations likely to scare the heck out of her. I was an adult male in an unexpected place, and too close. As a courtesy, I decided to act as not-scary as possible. I had about one second to plan my presentation.A second wasn’t long enough. She won’t need any coffee today.But in that one second I went through a lot of possible options for my posture, demeanor, and general expression. The way I approached the role was to go all statue-like as soon as the door opened. No sudden motions.
  • The Lonely Geek Advantage

    20 May 2015 | 8:55 am
    A few months ago my brother was in town and we spent much of our time tinkering with a new lighting system for my garage man-cave, tracking down some Ethernet wiring problems, learning how to edit video, connecting an old computer to an old television to display my website analytics, and a few other projects.Geeky stuff.How much did we enjoy it? A lot. My brother’s visit was the highlight of my month. Everything we worked on had a functional purpose, but the reason we allocated our leisure time to it is because it was fun.As a result of tinkering on stuff with my brother, I learned a…
  • Death by SEO

    18 May 2015 | 7:30 am
    As most of you know, several years ago I lost my ability to speak due to a rare voice problem called Spasmodic Dysphonia. My doctor and the specialists that he recommended were baffled. No one knew what was causing it. And until you have a name for your problem, it is nearly impossible to find a solution.After a year of searching online for every variation of “voice problem,” and finding nothing like my symptoms, I finally – by luck or inspiration – landed on a search term that changed my life: “Voice dystonia.”I had some history with a pinky spasm caused by overuse of my…
  • The “Systems” Business Model

    15 May 2015 | 8:39 am
    A typical start-up created by an inexperienced entrepreneur has about a 10% chance of success.But if that same entrepreneur pivots, or starts a second company, the odds of the next venture succeeding jumps to about 20%. And that makes sense because you learn a lot during your first failure, and you make a lot of contacts that can be useful later.If you go up the odds chain, an angel investor with twenty investments in different companies might have a 70% chance of doing well because of the value of diversification. A start-up incubator does a similar thing by holding equity in a diverse…
  • Robots Read News - About Deflategate

    13 May 2015 | 10:55 am
    If your firewall is blocking the image, see it on Twitter here.In Berkeley start-up news, this guy might have found a way to turn his toe fungus into a billion-dollar business. If you have toe fungus too, and all you did about it was wear socks with your sandals, you are officially an underachiever. (This is not an investment recommendation.)In Top Tech news, how about wings for humans, powered by jets? Already here. What could go wrong?And do you like your robots all metallic and cold, or soft to the touch and oh-so-creepy? Technology has you covered, and the robots too.How long before the…
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    Doc Searls Weblog » Doc Searls Weblog »

  • Dear Magazines: please quit screwing loyal subscribers

    Doc Searls
    23 May 2015 | 1:37 am
    When my main credit card got yanked for some kind of fraud activity earlier this month (as it seems all of them do, sooner or later) I had the unpleasant task of going back over my bills to see what companies I’d need to give a new credit card number. Among those many (Amazon, Apple, PayPal, Dish Network, EasyPass…) were a bunch of magazines that get renewed annually. These include: The New Yorker Vanity Fair Wired New York Consumer Reports At my wife’s urging (for she is more mindful of money and scams than I am), I compared the last automatic renewal fee to the current…
  • Live blogging

    Doc Searls
    22 May 2015 | 3:32 am
    Perhaps you’ve noticed that I’ve been quiet here for a bit. One reason is that I’ve been traveling almost constantly, and not always in the best position to blog (or even tweet). Another is that I’ve been liveblogging instead. So here, latest first, is a list of liveblog postings since my last post here: May 20 May 18 May 17 May 16 May 15 May 14 May 13 May 11 May 9 May 7 May 6 May 5 Most are lists of links: tabs I’m closing. Many contain bloggy additional notes. Some are more extensive, such as my liveblog notes on @janelgw‘s talk in New York on May 6.
  • Mercy for the bereaved

    Doc Searls
    4 May 2015 | 9:43 am
    I didn’t know Dave Goldberg, but I can’t count all the friends and relatives who were close to him. By all their accounts, he was a brilliant and wonderful guy, much loved and respected by everybody who knew and worked with him. Along with the rest of the world, I await word on what happened. So far that word hasn’t come. But it hasn’t stopped speculation. For example, this post by Penelope Trunk, which imagines a worst-possible scenario — or a set of them — on the basis of no evidence other than knowing nothing. And why do we know nothing? Put yourself in…
  • Internet.org is a failed exercise in misdirection

    Doc Searls
    18 Apr 2015 | 4:12 am
    Like the universe, the Internet is one thing. It is a World of Ends, comprised of everything it connects. By nature it is as neutral as gravity. It favors nothing and is not partial to anything. Yes, there are exceptions to that rule, in the way Net access is provisioned, for example; but the basic nature of the Net — as a free, open and neutral shared space — is by now obvious to pretty much everybody who doesn’t have an interest in making it less. Internet.org calls itself “a Facebook-led initiative bringing together technology leaders, non-profits and local…
  • This is why you want a window seat

    Doc Searls
    14 Apr 2015 | 4:48 pm
    I’ve seen auroras on red-eyes between the U.S. and Europe before. This one over Lake Superior, for example, on a July night in 2007. And this one over Greenland in September 2012. But both of those were fairly dim. Sunday night’s red-eye was different. This one was a real show. And I almost missed it. First, my window seat had no window. It was 33A on a United 777: an exit row, with lots of legroom, but a wall where other seats have a window. But I got a corner of the window behind me if I leaned back. The girl sitting there shut the window to block out the sun earlier in the…
 
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    AVC

  • Video Of The Week: The New York Public Library Bitcoin Discussion

    Fred Wilson
    23 May 2015 | 4:48 am
    Last week we had a discussion at the New York Public Library about Bitcoin. Andrew Ross Sorkin moderated a discussion between Nathaniel Popper, author of Digital Gold, Bitcoin Chief Scientist Gavin Andresen, and me. Here it is:
  • Followup Friday: The Results of the Apple Watch Followup Survey

    Fred Wilson
    22 May 2015 | 4:46 am
    Here are the results of the survey we did on AVC yesterday (click on the image to see it in a larger format). These are very good numbers for the Apple Watch.
  • The Apple Watch – How Is It Doing?

    Fred Wilson
    21 May 2015 | 3:46 am
    Continuing my obsession with the Apple Watch, a device I don’t own and don’t intend to own, I’m curious how its doing. I read a report yesterday that suggested the early sales are disappointing and that a respected research firm has cut first year sales projections to 15mm watches although Morgan Stanley still has their estimate at 36mm watches. But more than how it is selling, I am curious how it is doing with those of you out there that bought it. If you own an Apple Watch, please complete this short survey. I appreciate it. I will post screenshots of the results as they…
  • CSNYC At Two

    Fred Wilson
    20 May 2015 | 3:27 am
    Next Wednesday night, at Civic Hall in New York City at 6:30pm, CSNYC will celebrate its second anniversary. For those that don’t know, CSNYC is a non-profit dedicated to the idea that every child who goes through the NYC public school system should encounter computer science along the way, in elementary school, in middle school, and in high school, and those that want to do a deep exploration of computer science should be able to do that before they graduate high school. The idea is not to turn every student into a software engineer, although it would be good if a bunch of students…
  • Digital Gold

    Fred Wilson
    19 May 2015 | 3:43 am
    Nathaniel Popper‘s Digital Gold, a history of the people who built Bitcoin into a global distributed transaction network that is not controlled by any person or any company, is available for purchase today. I’ve been reading it and enjoying it very much. Even though I have been involved in and closely following the sector since 2011, I did not know all the details of the early days and Nathaniel captured them well. In celebration of the book being out, The New York Public Library is hosting a conversation between Nathaniel, Gavin Andresen, and me tonight. It will be moderated by…
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    Signal vs. Noise

  • The stories we tell ourselves

    David
    12 May 2015 | 5:56 am
    The progress of technology needs a full spectrum of adoption to work well. From early adopters who jump in before kinks and warts have been banished, to a late majority who bring scale to the now-safe choice. If we didn’t have any early adopters ironing out the kinks, there’d never be a now-safe choice for the late majority. And if everyone always jumped on the latest thing on day one, society would waste needless cycles churning through the broken glass of beta software. But usually people see things a little narrower. They’ve picked a group to belong to, and along with it…
  • A Year of The Distance

    Wailin Wong
    12 May 2015 | 5:21 am
    A year ago, The Distance published its first story: a profile of 110-year-old Horween Leather Co., Chicago’s last remaining tannery. Since then, we’ve visited an 18,000-square-foot costume and wig store and a vintage tiki bar with its own gift shop. We’ve met a custom bra fitter who started her business as a single mom and the second-generation owner of an auto salvage yard that ran the same commercial on local television for 30 years. We launched The Distance because we believe the people behind long-running businesses have amassed a lot of wisdom from their decades of experience.
  • The homescreens of Basecamp (2015)

    Jamie
    8 May 2015 | 6:43 am
    Back in 2011 and 2013, we shared our phone homescreens with you. We get a kick out of how others personalize their mobile phones. A lot’s changed since then: we have a few more folks on Android, there are 3 varieties of iPhones (6 is the most popular), some of us like having monster phones, and there’s even a Watch among us. Attention: there are a lot of homescreens in this post. The screens all start to blur together (apart from the Android ones), but they’re all interesting when you take the time to examine them. This is a great article for your lunchtime/afternoon break…
  • Poison

    Nathan Kontny
    30 Apr 2015 | 9:09 am
    How do we get better at making things people want? We strive to better discern the needs of our customers, so we reach for a number of tools. Surveys. User testing. 'Jobs to be done' interviews (an interview process I highly recommend). But in our effort to understand our customers, we often miss sight of something much more basic and integral to those things working well. The University of Edinburgh Medical School, one of the best medical schools in the United Kingdom, was created in 1726, also making it one of the oldest medical schools in the English speaking world. Given its age,…
  • Programming with toys and magic should be relished, not scorned

    David
    29 Apr 2015 | 12:17 pm
    In the early days of Rails, a common dismissal of the framework and its Ruby roots were that these were just toys. Something for kids or amateurs to play with; to build a quick throw-away prototype or system of no consequence. It was most certainly not a tool for professionals building real systems for enterprise, king, or country. Explicit in this charge against Rails and Ruby laid a grander, sweeping dismissal of toys of all kinds. And more specifically, a rejection of fun and enjoyment as valid reasons for adoption of technology that remains prevalent to this day. The implication that real…
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    chrisbrogan.com

  • The Value of Data Velocity in Marketing

    Chris Brogan
    21 May 2015 | 6:33 am
    I’m working on some interesting stuff as it relates to both bigger businesses as well as small businesses. I’m interested in how better use of data could open up a whole big slice of not-yet-tapped economic value for companies (again both bigger and smaller). It’s times like this where I feel bad for people who think I’m the “social media guy.” I’m thinking about velocity as it applies to marketing. Meaning, if we knew something faster, could we add more value and help someone better? Velocity as a Marketing Tool I was in Atlanta the other day for 20…
  • The Secret Empire Decades in the Making (and how you can start yours and get there faster than me)

    Chris Brogan
    12 May 2015 | 6:08 pm
    I started blogging back in 1998. I had no idea what it was going to turn into. But over the last handful of years, I’ve known more and more what this all CAN do together. A Peek Into How This All Threads Together for ME I’m sharing MY personal setup. You can do yours any which way you want. But There’s some method to the madness, and it’s all contained in that picture above. I wanted to show you how it works for me.Continue ReadingThe post The Secret Empire Decades in the Making (and how you can start yours and get there faster than me) appeared first on…
  • How My Mom and Dad Became Drug Dealers and Why You Should Switch to Rainmaker

    Chris Brogan
    6 May 2015 | 6:50 am
    My mom (and sometimes my dad) blog quite regularly on a site called Mom Pop Pow. I can’t post the link, because it’s thrashed with spam right now. The site was hacked. Last time Mom checked, there were many WordPress plugins that needed updating. Those might be the culprit, too. WordPress maintenance can be a part time job, I swear. And even if everything were 100% buttoned up, there are still malicious people out there looking to take over your site. It’s happened to me. Twice. Expensively. So Now My Mom and Dad are Drug Dealers You’d think that if you visited their…
  • Are You A Business or a White Truck?

    Chris Brogan
    5 May 2015 | 12:22 pm
    A friend recently emailed me and said she was having a crisis of faith, that her attempts to work with people weren’t going especially well, that she felt a bit lost in it all. I gave her some fairly harsh feedback, but all in the service of love. The shortest version of my response to her? “You have a white truck, not a business.” Define Your Business As Clearly As You Can When I talk about a “white truck” business, here’s the thing: if you buy a white truck like the one in the picture above, you CAN do pretty much anything with it. You could be a…
  • How I Use the Social Networks These Days

    Chris Brogan
    1 May 2015 | 9:43 am
    This post won’t change your life. Just the same, I wanted to tell you that I see a lot of shifts in the whole online/social networks landscape. Some of it kind of saddens me. The rest of it points to the weakening state of effectiveness of various platforms as business tools. You can disagree. That’s fine. Social Networks for Business I should note that most of my opinions have changed dramatically (180 degrees level) in the last handful of months. I’m basing this on business. Not on whether I like or don’t like something, unless I state it as such.Continue ReadingThe…
 
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    dooce®

  • Minutes

    dooce
    21 May 2015 | 11:44 am
    If you've got some to spare, I'd gladly take them off of your hands.
  • Who run this mother?

    dooce
    7 May 2015 | 12:10 pm
    This goes out to all my girls that's in the club rocking the latest.
  • Old Man Jones

    dooce
    4 May 2015 | 8:06 am
    My new nickname for the poet who lives in the basement.
  • Looking upward and ahead

    dooce
    23 Apr 2015 | 2:37 pm
    On the desire I have to get back to why I started "living online" in the first place: writing for the love of it, writing when the story inside is begging to be told.
  • Stuff On Chuck

    dooce
    20 Apr 2015 | 8:16 am
    "When I tried to write happy / Yo I knew I lied, I lived a life of crime / Why play ya blind?"
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    Calacanis.com

  • News Roundtable with Jessica Lessin (The Information) & Ari Levy (CNBC) on This Week in Startups

    Jacqui
    23 May 2015 | 1:44 pm
    News Roundtable: Secret’s bank heist, Google as Game of Thrones, Apple TV’s fate, Facebook’s about-face in revenue sharing, the combustible combo of venture+journalism, weed on demand It’s News Roundtable Friday! Joining Jason today is Jessica Lessin, Founder & Editor-in-Chief of The Information and Ari Levy, Senior Technology Reporter at CNBC. The three tackle the latest, greatest, juiciest stories of late in this epic episode. Nothing is left off the table. Secret’s bank heist, how Google is like Game of Thrones, is Android poised for world domination?, the…
  • Des Traynor, Cofounder of Intercom, on This Week in Startups

    Jacqui
    21 May 2015 | 10:35 am
    LAUNCH Incubator 2: Des Traynor, Cofounder Intercom, on product vision, roadmap, virality, & everything you need to know for “Starting Up” LAUNCH Incubator series is back! Today’s episode features returning speaker, Des Traynor, Cofounder of Intercom (www.intercom.io), who dazzles with a whole new tactical talk on “Starting Up.” Des’s presentation to the class covers everything from the importance of needing a vision (and what one looks like) to defining your roadmap, from the ins and outs of knowing your true competitors & marketplace (including…
  • TrueCar’s Scott Painter & Zenefits’ Parker Conrad on This Week in Startups

    Jacqui
    16 May 2015 | 12:57 pm
    True Car’s Scott Painter & Zenefits’ Parker Conrad bring new power to consumers & successfully reinvent entrenched industries: car-buying and human resources Today’s awesome two-part episode from Launch Festival 2015 features Founder/CEO of TrueCar Scott Painter and Cofounder/CEO of Zenefits Parker Conrad. Jason first sat down for a fascinating discussion with Scott about the mission of TrueCar (simple: a better way to buy a car), and how his business disrupts the industry. We learn how they have grown from $10m-$200m in revenue since launching at the Launch Festival a…
  • #TWiSTLive: May 20 with Amir Rubin, CEO Sixense, “Ask Jason” on stage + VR workshop

    Jacqui
    11 May 2015 | 12:11 pm
    I’d like you to join me on Wednesday, May 20th for our next #TWiSTLive at Samsung Global Innovation Center in Mountain View. It’ll be an awesome event, starting early with public office hours with me (“Ask Jason” or pitch your company idea on stage) and a hands-on VR workshop hosted by Andrew Dickerson, Director of Software Development, GearVP. [ Click to Tweet (can edit before sending): http://ctt.ec/5c9Q7 ] There will be plenty of networking opps with cocktails and appetizers before and after the show’s main event: my fireside chat with Amir Rubin. Amir is CEO of Sixense and…
  • The Last Mile (TLM) founder Chris Redlitz & graduate Kenyatta Leal on This Week in Startups

    Jacqui
    9 May 2015 | 12:25 pm
    In-prison accelerator The Last Mile teaches inmates technology & entrepreneurship, giving them essential skills & the promise of a better life; Founder Chris Redlitz & graduate Kenyatta Leal explain exactly how It’s one of Jason’s favorite episodes. In the studio is Chris Redlitz, Partner at Transmedia Capital and Founder of The Last Mile (TLM), a program that teaches prisoners technology and entrepreneurship to gain essential job skills and prevent recidivism. Joining as well is Last Mile grad Kenyatta Leal, former San Quentin inmate of 19 years and current Manager of…
 
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    Small Business Marketing Blog from Duct Tape Marketing

  • Weekend Favs May Twenty Three

    John Jantsch
    23 May 2015 | 5:39 am
    Weekend Favs May Twenty Three written by John Jantsch read more at Small Business Marketing Blog from Duct Tape Marketing My weekend blog post routine includes posting links to a handful of tools or great content I ran across during the week. I don’t go into depth about the finds, but encourage you check them out if they sound interesting. The photo in the post is a favorite for the week from Flickr or one that I took out there on the road. Adventures and road trips.Sunset and travel concept.Road and fields Good stuff I found this week: treat – location based payments you unlock…
  • The Minimalist Guide To Managing Your Brand Reputation Online

    Guest Post
    22 May 2015 | 3:10 am
    The Minimalist Guide To Managing Your Brand Reputation Online written by Guest Post read more at Small Business Marketing Blog from Duct Tape Marketing A dissatisfied customer, on an average, tells 25 of his friends, while a happy one tells only 15. Seems like if good reviews spread like wildfire, bad reviews would be rushing with light speed. Reviews, and how the masses consume them, are human nature, but this human nature can be fatal for online businesses especially at a time when 8 out of 10 customers treat and trust online reviews just like personal recommendations. Let me tell you,…
  • 5 Ways to Produce Eye-Catching Content Without a Designer

    Guest Post
    21 May 2015 | 10:13 am
    5 Ways to Produce Eye-Catching Content Without a Designer written by Guest Post read more at Small Business Marketing Blog from Duct Tape Marketing photo credit: kaboompics There’s nothing like great content. I create it for work. I create it for fun. Crazy? Perhaps. Especially since creating good, visually appealing content is a huge challenge faced by many. There is no rule that says you have to hire a pricey graphic designer in order to generate beautiful, design-rich content.  Of course, design specialists are a great resource to have on a team – but, for many earlier-stage…
  • Master the Habits of Your Life

    John Jantsch
    20 May 2015 | 7:18 am
    Master the Habits of Your Life written by John Jantsch read more at Small Business Marketing Blog from Duct Tape Marketing Marketing Podcast with Gretchen Rubin Habits are big business. In fact, creating, chaning and keeping habits has created an entire multi-billion dollar industry for books, apps, coaching, training and countless products. And why not, habitual behavior makes up about 90% of how we go through the day whether we are conscious of it or not. Our habits dictate how much we get done, how we feel, and how we come off to others. So, doesn’t it make logical sense that good…
  • How to Outrank Your Bad Reviews

    John Jantsch
    19 May 2015 | 2:11 pm
    How to Outrank Your Bad Reviews written by John Jantsch read more at Small Business Marketing Blog from Duct Tape Marketing You know the old saying – “the best defense is a good offense” – well, turns out that’s true when it comes to your online reputation as well. Hopefully, this has never happened to you, but all it takes is one unfortunate situation with a customer or one disgruntled employee to wreak havoc on your business. See, today when someone wants to check you out, they ask their friends and then turn to Google – even when their friend says…
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    KurzweilAI » News

  • Robots master skills with ‘deep learning’ technique

    22 May 2015 | 5:54 pm
    Robot learns to use hammer. What could go wrong? (credit: UC Berkeley) UC Berkeley researchers have developed new algorithms that enable robots to learn motor tasks by trial and error, using a process that more closely approximates the way humans learn. They demonstrated their technique, a type of reinforcement learning, by having a robot complete various tasks — putting a clothes hanger on a rack, assembling a toy plane, screwing a cap on a water bottle, and more — without pre-programmed details about its surroundings. A new AI approach “What we’re reporting on here is a new…
  • Robotic arm precisely controlled by thought

    22 May 2015 | 4:40 pm
    Erik Sorto smoothly controls robotic arm with his brain (credit: Spencer Kellis and Christian Klaes /Caltech) Paralyzed from the neck down, Erik G. Sorto now can smoothly move a robotic arm just by thinking about it, thanks to a clinical collaboration between Caltech, Keck Medicine of USC and Rancho Los Amigos National Rehabilitation Center, Previous neural prosthetic devices, such as Braingate, were implanted in the motor cortex, resulting in delayed, jerky movements. The new device was implanted in the posterior parietal cortex (PPC), a part of the brain that controls the intent to move,…
  • Tunable liquid-metal antennas

    21 May 2015 | 8:51 pm
    Antenna, feed, and reservoir of a liquid metal antenna (credit: Jacob Adams) Using electrochemistry, North Carolina State University (NCSU) researchers have created a reconfigurable, voltage-controlled liquid metal antenna that may play a role in future mobile devices and the coming Internet of Things. By placing a positive or negative electrical voltage across the interface between the liquid metal and an electrolyte, they found that they could cause the liquid metal to spread (flow into a capillary) or contract, changing its operating frequency and radiation pattern. “Using a liquid…
  • How to make continuous rolls of graphene for volume production

    21 May 2015 | 8:39 pm
    Diagram of the roll-to-roll process (a) shows the arrangement of copper spools at each end of the processing tube, and how a ribbon of thin copper substrate is wound around the central tube. Cross-section view of the same setup (b) shows the gap between two tubes, where the chemical vapor deposition process occurs. Photos of the system being tested show (c) the overall system, with an arrow indicating the direction the ribbon is moving; (d) a closeup of the copper ribbon inside the apparatus, showing the holes where chemical vapor is injected; and (e) an overhead view of the copper foil…
  • New technology could fundamentally improve future wireless communications

    21 May 2015 | 7:50 pm
    Novel full-duplex transceiver (top device) in an anechoic chamber for testing (credit: Sam Duckerin) A new electronics technique that could allow a radio device to transmit and receive on the same channel at the same time (“full duplex,” or simultaneous, two-way transmission) has been developed by researchers at the University of Bristol’s Communication Systems and Networks research group. The technique can estimate and cancel out the interference from a device’s own transmission. Today’s cell phones and other communication devices use twice as much of the radio…
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    Matt Mullenweg

  • Soaring SV Housing

    Matt
    23 May 2015 | 6:38 pm
    Talent is leaving Silicon Valley because of high real estate costs. Today, the median price for a home just exceeded $1 million. Why one in four Silicon Valley homebuyers wants to leave. Yep.
  • TC on Apple Watch

    Matt
    22 May 2015 | 5:55 pm
    The John Biggs article on Why I’m Still Wearing My Apple Watch almost perfectly describes how I’m feeling about the watch right now. It is a very personal device, I’ve gotten attached to the little fellow, and I should probably start selling all my mechanical watches.
  • Undercover UberX

    Matt
    21 May 2015 | 10:29 pm
    Emily Guendelsberger went undercover as an UberX driver in Philadelphia and wrote about the experience, particularly the economics of it. It’s a pretty fascinating and gripping longread, both in its content and it’s just well-written.
  • William Zinsser Obit

    Matt
    20 May 2015 | 9:41 pm
    Mr. Zinsser was a prolific author, editor and teacher, but it was his role as an arbiter of good writing that resonated widely and deeply. The New York Times obituary of William Zinsser is touching and fascinating. Clear writing and clear thinking go hand in hand, and Zinnsser’s work On Writing Well did more than any other to help me hone my mind.
  • Woo & Automattic

    Matt
    19 May 2015 | 11:59 am
    For years, we’ve been working on democratizing publishing, and today more people have independent sites built on open source software than ever before in the history of the web. Now, we want to make it easy for anyone to sell online independently, without being locked into closed, centralized services — to enable freedom of livelihood along with freedom of expression. It’s not a new idea: at a WordCamp a few years ago, someone stood up and asked me when we were going to make it as easy to create an online store as we’d made it to create a blog. Everyone applauded; there’s…
 
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    Tom Peters

  • HOW Chicago and a Cool Friend

    Cathy Mosca
    19 May 2015 | 7:58 am
    Tom bumped into a Cool Friend at the HOW Design Conference in Chicago. Not surprisingly, John Maeda was among the speakers, and he and Tom got a chance to have a bit of conversation. We interviewed Maeda in 2006, when he was part of the Simplicity Consortium at the MIT Media Lab. From there he […] The post HOW Chicago and a Cool Friend appeared first on Tom Peters.
  • HOW Chicago

    Cathy Mosca
    5 May 2015 | 4:31 pm
    As announced earlier, Tom was the Tuesday evening keynote speaker at Chicago's HOW Design Live Conference. Slides: HOW Design Live, Final HOW Design Live, Chicago, Long Version The post HOW Chicago appeared first on Tom Peters.
  • Tom in Chicago May 5th

    Cathy Mosca
    23 Apr 2015 | 6:09 am
    The HOW Design Conference will be presented May 4 through 8 in Chicago. Tom's on the schedule as the Tuesday evening keynote speaker, May 5th. Single-day tickets are available for the four-day event. The post Tom in Chicago May 5th appeared first on Tom Peters.
  • Trinidad and Tobago

    Cathy Mosca
    13 Apr 2015 | 3:09 pm
    Today's event takes Tom to the Republic of Trinidad and Tobago for the Arthur Lok Jack Graduate School of Business 2015 Distinguished Leadership and Innovation Conference in Port of Spain. The other principal speaker at this premier annual regional event is Tom’s long time colleague Peter Senge—Peter, the world’s leading evangelist for “systems thinking,” is […] The post Trinidad and Tobago appeared first on Tom Peters.
  • Tom (Back) in São Paulo

    Cathy Mosca
    8 Apr 2015 | 1:51 pm
    Tom is speaking to the HSM Management & Leadership Forum in São Paulo today. He reckons it's about his 15th or so visit to SP in the last, say, 25 years. As usual, he's working with his colleague and HSM founder Jose Salibi Neto. From the start Tom has called HSM events "peerless." Over the […] The post Tom (Back) in São Paulo appeared first on Tom Peters.
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    Intuitive Systems

  • Interview with business book author Valeh Nazemoff

    Dave Taylor
    29 Apr 2015 | 6:55 am
    When I was sent a copy of the book The Four Intelligences of the Business Mind I decided it’d be more interesting to interview the author, Valeh Nazemoff, than just write about the book itself. Thus this interview… Q: What are the four intelligences of the business mind, Valeh? The Four Intelligences of the Business Mind are made up of financial, customer, data and mastermind intelligence. In order to transform a business, leaders can go beyond the traditional paradigm of intellect, such as IQ, and employ these four aspects of intelligence to truly succeed. Decision makers are…
  • Smart: the Tosee Intelligent Cigarette Filter

    Dave Taylor
    24 Mar 2015 | 5:56 am
    I don’t smoke. In fact, I’ve never smoked a single cigarette in my life, but my Dad smoked most of his life, though in the latter part of his life he was down to a single cigarette he’d make last through much of a day because he knew of the ill effect it could have. He tried to quit but tobacco has addictive ingredients and it’s darn hard to just stop. I can appreciate that, and supported his one cig/day habit as he was older. There are many aspects to smoking beyond the ingredients and while it does seem to be diminishing as a habit, as you can see in the graph below…
  • Comparing the MacBook and the Dell XPS 13

    Dave Taylor
    9 Mar 2015 | 5:05 pm
    Much ado about the announcement today from Apple of the all new MacBook. Not MacBook Air, not MacBook Pro, just “MacBook”. Okay, that’s not confusing, Mr. Cook. Still, as I’ve been spending a lot of time with the beautiful new Dell XPS 13 Windows laptop, I thought it would be interesting to compare the two as there are a lot of similarities between the devices. First off, let’s start with device photos. Here’s the new 2015 MacBook: And here’s the 2015 Dell XPS 13: The Apple system is definitely thinner, but boy does it have one big bevel when compared…
  • Another Credit Card Bites the Dust

    Dave Taylor
    21 Feb 2015 | 6:44 pm
    Another month, another credit card I have to cancel. This time I had to destroy my PayPal debit card because I was watching my transaction records, as I do, and saw an email about a $105 transaction at the Meijer store in Lima, Ohio. Now I’ve never been to Lima, Ohio so that was a curious transaction that caught my eye, to say the least. Thinking I’d be a good citizen I called Meijer to see if there was any way that we could just void out that transaction or at least they could tell me what “I” purchased. After all, perhaps it was something online. But no, it…
  • A Eulogy for Radio Shack

    Dave Taylor
    6 Feb 2015 | 10:02 am
    The Original 1921 Radio Shack Logo It’s been a long time coming, and the company’s been doing poorly for at least a decade, but it’s still sad to see tech gadget stalwart Radio Shack declare bankruptcy today. Rumors swirl around what will happen to the over 5000 stores they have worldwide, with some predicting that Amazon will acquire some as demo outlets while others suggest Sprint is exploring options for making them branded mobile stores, but whatever happens, over half the retail outlets will be shut down in the near future. Started way back in 1921 by brothers,…
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    Conversation Agent - Valeria Maltoni

  • The Differences Between Being Past, Present, and Future-Oriented According to Philip Zimbardo

    Valeria Maltoni
    22 May 2015 | 2:40 am
    In a talk he gave a few years ago, renowned psychologist Professor Philip Zimbardo explains how our individual perspectives of time affect our work, health and well-being. We have different relationships with time, says Zimbardo: what we have discovered in 30 years of research there are six main time ones that people live in; two focused on the past; two on the present and two on the future. The people who focus on the past either remember all the good old times, successes, happy birthdays, nostalgia, these are the people who keep the family records, the family books, who preserve the family…
  • Brian Grazer and the Secret to a Bigger Life

    Valeria Maltoni
    21 May 2015 | 2:40 am
    Along with Apollo 13, Splash, Parenthood, The Da Vinci Code, Frost/Nixon, J. Edgar and more, Brian Grazer produced A Beautiful Mind, a story directed by Ron Howard -- his business partner -- and interpreted by Russel Crowe, Jennifer Connelly, and Paul Bethany. The movie won 4 Academy Awards. In A Curious Mind, written with Charles Fishman, Grazer reveals how he got started meeting with people from diverse backgrounds to have open-ended conversations about their lives and work. Early in his career, he learned that to broaden his horizons, he needed to escape the Hollywood bubble: “I have to…
  • Why the Page Fold Still Matters

    Valeria Maltoni
    20 May 2015 | 2:40 am
    Rather than a set measurement, in digital experiences the fold, or the portion of the webpage that is visible without scrolling, is a concept. In the fold manifesto, Amy Shade says: The fold matters because what appears at the top of your page matters. Users do scroll, but only if what’s above the fold is promising enough. What is visible on the page without requiring any action is what encourages us to scroll. This is true on any size screen, be it mobile, tablet, or desktop: anything that’s hidden and that the user must uncover will only be seen if the user deems it worth the hassle.
  • Empathy and Emotion as Seen Through the Eyes of Children

    Valeria Maltoni
    19 May 2015 | 2:40 am
    The preparation for today's speaking event at #dareconfUSA spanned more than 12 weeks. We developed the talks as a team -- Meredith Noble, Sharon Bautista, Hannah du Plessis, and Jonathan Kahn and I -- we each worked to find our voice. What I mean when I think about finding your voice is working in a way that is true to who you are. Work is an expression of self, and if it is not true to it, there is no joy in the doing. Finding the child in you, letting curiosity guide you in solving problems, and tapping into love are all good side effects of this process.  Successful collaborations and…
  • What Makes Telling a Personal Story Valuable?

    Valeria Maltoni
    18 May 2015 | 2:40 am
    How do you go about it? I can tell you that it's a long process and takes a lot of work. Because of one key element your story needs to have to be valuable -- human context. Tomorrow we will take the stage and #dareconfUSA and tell our stories. Mine was a defining moment in the arc of my life and the story arc will convey how much that decision has changed me from that point forward. Stories without a turning point are just anecdotes. Peter Aguero, The Moth's StorySLAM host says: “I’ve seen people tell stories about things that are really difficult for them. And you know, when they are…
 
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    Jeffrey Zeldman Presents The Daily Report: Web Design News & Insights Since 1995

  • A byte saved is a follower earned: Web Performance Then And Now

    Jeffrey Zeldman
    20 May 2015 | 5:56 am
    FIFTEEN years ago this month, a plucky ALA staffer wrote “Much Ado About 5K,” an article on a contest created by Stewart Butterfield that challenged web designers and developers to build a complete website using less than five kilobytes of images and code. As one group of modern web makers embraces mobile-first design and performance budgets, while another (the majority) worships at the altar of bigger, fatter, and slower, the 5K contest reminds us that a byte saved is a follower earned. More in 15 Years Ago in ALA: Much Ado About 5K.
  • A List Apart № 420: Add Friction to Interactions, Customize With Care

    Jeffrey Zeldman
    19 May 2015 | 11:41 am
    IN ISSUE № 420 of A List Apart: Meta-Moments: Thoughtfulness by Design by ANDREW GRIMES Does the internet ever stop you in your tracks? Does it sometimes make you pause and think about what you’re doing? Andrew Grimes calls such moments meta-moments. He walks us through why meta-moments are occasionally necessary and how we might build them into the experiences we design. ⇛ Approaching Content Strategy for Personalized Websites by COLIN EAGAN Experience management systems are making it easier than ever to customize content for your visitors—but are you using your newfound…
  • A List Apart № 419: Narratives & Conversations

    Jeffrey Zeldman
    5 May 2015 | 1:55 pm
    IN ISSUE № 419 of A List Apart: Do Androids Dream in Free Verse by JOSCELIN COOPER From ATMs to Siri to the button text in an application user interface, we “talk” to our tech—and our tech talks back. Often this exchange is purely transactional, but newer technologies have renegotiated this relationship. Joscelin Cooper reflects on how we can design successful human-machine conversations that are neither cloying nor overly mechanical. ⇛ Building Nonlinear Narratives for the Web by SENONGO AKPEM The web operates in ways that can conflict with our traditional view of what a…
  • “Creative” is not a dirty word

    Jeffrey Zeldman
    23 Apr 2015 | 2:02 pm
    THERE’S a meme promulgated by my dear friend Monteiro that they call you creative to take your power away. Rubbish. Don’t get me wrong. I agree with most of what Mike Monteiro has to say about design, which is why I published his two brilliant books. Except for this one point, on which we will forever disagree. “Creative” is not a dirty word, and it doesn’t diminish our profession to admit that creativity is part of what goes into great design—along with research, data, conversation, testing, and all the other science-y stuff we trot…
  • Who’s Afraid of the Big Bad Medium?

    Jeffrey Zeldman
    20 Apr 2015 | 6:48 am
    IN 2003, long before he was a creative director at Twitter, Douglas Bowman wrote articles about design, posted case studies about his design projects, and shared his photography on his personal/business site, stopdesign.com. A year previously, Doug had attained instant fame in standardista circles by recoding Wired.com using CSS for layout. That sounds nonsensical nowadays, but in 2002, folks like me were still struggling to persuade our fellow web designers to use CSS, and not HTML tables, for layout. Leading web designers had begun seeing the light, and there had been a sudden profusion of…
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    Andy Sernovitz | Damn, I Wish I'd Thought of That!

  • Newsletter #1038: The “Make Someone Smile” Issue

    Andy Sernovitz
    21 May 2015 | 8:00 am
    [Welcome back to the Damn, I Wish I’d Thought of That! newsletter. This is text of the great issue all of our email subscribers just received. Sign yourself up using the handy form on the right.] Don’t get too caught up in complicated marketing. You don’t always need a coupon or a call to action. Sometimes the best marketing is the kind that’s so simple it catches people off guard with happiness. Here are three simple things to make people smile: 1. Balloons 2. Friendly phone calls 3. Pretty dumpsters 4. Check it out: Eyes in Space 1. Balloons Fleur, a florist shop…
  • Newsletter #1037: The “Making Ideas Your Own” Issue

    Andy Sernovitz
    14 May 2015 | 8:00 am
    [Welcome back to the Damn, I Wish I’d Thought of That! newsletter. This is text of the great issue all of our email subscribers just received. Sign yourself up using the handy form on the right.] We’re all about trying new things and getting outside of your comfort zone to see what works for you. But you don’t have to reinvent the wheel to get a good idea rolling. Chances are, you could learn from someone who’s already doing something brilliant. Here are three companies that took great ideas from unlikely sources: 1. Soccer stadiums and breweries 2. Business blogs…
  • Newsletter #1036: The “Throwback” Issue

    Andy Sernovitz
    7 May 2015 | 8:00 am
    [Welcome back to the Damn, I Wish I’d Thought of That! newsletter. This is text of the great issue all of our email subscribers just received. Sign yourself up using the handy form on the right.] Everyone loves some good ol’ nostalgia. Just think of all the BuzzFeed articles about the 90s, Throwback Thursdays, and Timehops. All you have to do is glance at your social media feed to see that people are all about reminiscing, bringing back old traditions, and making history relevant again. Here are three ways companies and organizations are doing the same to create unique marketing…
  • Newsletter #1035: The “On the Road” Issue

    Andy Sernovitz
    30 Apr 2015 | 8:00 am
    [Welcome back to the Damn, I Wish I’d Thought of That! newsletter. This is text of the great issue all of our email subscribers just received. Sign yourself up using the handy form on the right.] There’s so much marketing potential in the quintessential road trip, in traveling, and in serving the people out on the road every day. But it’s about much more than flagging over those out-of-town visitors and people passing through with a bigger, flashier billboard. Check out these three ideas for reaching people out on the open road: 1. Truckstop doctor 2. Traveling line…
  • Newsletter #1034: The “Two Birds, One Stone” Issue

    Andy Sernovitz
    23 Apr 2015 | 8:00 am
    [Welcome back to the Damn, I Wish I’d Thought of That! newsletter. This is text of the great issue all of our email subscribers just received. Sign yourself up using the handy form on the right.] When you look at your problems as opportunities, you might find that your issue can be someone else’s solution, your trash, someone else’s treasure, or that by working together you can create a win-win solution. Here are a few examples of how businesses and organizations are killing two birds with one stone: 1. Nursing homes and student housing 2. Server storage and home heat 3.
 
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    @ProBlogger

  • Hey Bloggers! Is it Time to Focus a little Less on Your Blog and A Little More on YOU?

    Darren Rowse
    19 May 2015 | 4:48 pm
    Blogging has been very good to me over the last twelve and a half years, but it’s come at a personal cost that I’m sure many can relate to. Gradually over that time I’ve allowed myself to become more and more inactive. Gradually over time I became less and less fit and gained more and more weight. Along with the weight gain and loss of fitness came a loss of energy and mental alertness. If I’m honest it also began to impact my mental health which in turn impacted numerous other areas of my life from relationships to my personal confidence and even through into my…
  • 5 Unmissable Fiverr Gigs that Will Make Your Life Easy as a Busy Blogger

    Guest Blogger
    19 May 2015 | 7:04 am
    This is a guest contribution from Pooja Lohana. Ever get mad at yourself? Because your blog is not going the way you’d like it to? You come to your desk, stare at the computer and realize there’s so much to be done. You’re tired before you’ve begun your day. But blogging is supposed to be fun. At least that’s what you were told, right? Thankfully, you can prevent that feeling of dread and overwhelm from the bulk of everyday tasks in business. Unless you’ve been living under a rock, you’ve heard of Fiverr. It’s a marketplace where users sell and buy various services starting…
  • 7 Ways To Build Your Brand In The Blogosphere

    Guest Blogger
    17 May 2015 | 7:00 am
    This is a guest contribution from Jeff Foster. Blogger outreach is one of the most effective ways to build your brand. It’s a great way to connect with potential customers – the blogosphere gives you a ready-made audience who are already interested in your type of product or service. But if you’re going to succeed, you need to build strong relationships with bloggers who want to be your brand ambassadors. This takes work – don’t expect to shoot off a few emails and have bloggers lining up at your door. The good news is that there are proven ways to make your blogger outreach a…
  • How Design Impacts Blog Readership

    Guest Blogger
    14 May 2015 | 7:00 am
    This is a guest contribution from Damion Wasylow. You have things to say, ideas to spread and concepts to share. That’s why you’re a blogger. But, if you’re like most bloggers, you’re much better with words than visuals. As a result, many bloggers’ sites are poorly designed or rely on simple templates. Your content may bring people to your blog, but poor design and usability can seriously limit your readership. First Impressions are Everything Studies show that new visitors develop an opinion of your website within 50 milliseconds. That’s 0.05 seconds. In that time, they make…
  • 4 Things to Consider When Choosing Your Domain Name

    Stacey Roberts
    12 May 2015 | 7:00 am
    When there’s more than 284 million registered domain names online, you’re going to want yours to stand out. But you also want to be easily remembered, have a URL that accurately describes your business, and it would help if it ranks well in Google. Right? Right. It’s very easy to buy a domain name that you come to regret later. What was useful and fashionable years ago suddenly is unwieldy and a pain in the butt to describe now. You might take what you can get if your favoured domain is already taken, only for that to expire later on and you’re stuck with one you…
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    Brian Solis

  • The Expertise Gap is Real and Employees Need Your Attention Now

    Brian Solis
    21 May 2015 | 4:12 am
    The biggest challenge is not in the understanding or expertise associated with new technology. We can learn that. The biggest problem is our inability to recognize that the experience we have today is not the experience we need going forward. A notable separation exists between the expertise people have or are learning and the jobs companies need to hire for in an increasingly digital economy. This means that current employees possess expertise to perform jobs that are losing prominence in business while new jobs openings (or the need to create them) are becoming increasingly difficult to…
  • Working for More Than a Living

    Guest Author
    13 May 2015 | 10:02 am
    Special guest post by Tom Rath, author of Are You Fully Charged?: The 3 Keys to Energizing Your Work and Life The concept of bringing people together in groups, tribes, or organizations is based on the fundamental premise that human beings can do more collectively than they can in isolation. Hundreds of years ago, people banded together for the sake of sharing food and shelter and keeping their family safe. The basic assumption was that the association gained by joining a group would benefit individuals and their loved ones. As a species, humans are better off together than they are apart.
  • When You Share Experiences You Help Strangers Make Decisions

    Brian Solis
    5 May 2015 | 1:16 pm
    Whether you realize it or not, when you share an experience you have, whether it’s through a post, review, video, image, rant, praise, etc., it helps a stranger make a decision about what to do next. Customers aren’t following the customer journey you designed because they’re too busy hacking it. No matter how much journey work you do, no matter how creative your marketing, no matter how responsive your website is, no matter how much technology you invest in, customers trust the experiences of others over your words aka branding and the path you’ve laid out for them.
  • Thanks Millennials! The Digital Revolution is Only Just Beginning

    Guest Author
    30 Apr 2015 | 4:15 am
      Guest post by Maddie Grant (@maddiegrant) author of the new book When Millennials Take Over,  exploring the digital mindset and the other three key capacities for recruiting, retaining and engaging Millennials Think about this: the Millennial generation is the first generation to NEVER know a workplace without the internet. The rest of us remember the time we got our first email address, or that time we were irritated because we weren’t part of the lucky few that were allowed one of the two company email addresses. Some of us might even remember how the fax machine took a bite out…
  • The 7 Success Factors of Social Business Strategy [INFOGRAPHIC]

    Brian Solis
    28 Apr 2015 | 5:08 am
    Over the years, my partner Charlene Li and I authored a series of research papers and also a short book on the evolution of social businesses, from philosophy to strategy to practice. Along the way, we also produced an effective maturity model and infographic that documented the six stages of social business transformation. This work would eventually pave the way  toward my focus on digital transformation and innovation today. Now, after all this time however, I wanted to share the official infographic from our ebook, The 7 Success Factors of Social Business Strategy. In our work, Charlene I…
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    Joho the Blog

  • [2b2k] Echo chambers and the importance of like-minded thinking

    davidw
    23 May 2015 | 7:52 am
    I’ve found the argument against Echo Chambers to be vexing. On the one hand, I of course agree that it’s bad for us all when we only hang out with people whose views we share, because this tends to confirm us in our beliefs and even makes those beliefs more extreme. On the other hand, I disagree with our Western liberal assumption that a genuine conversation is one in which we encounter radically opposite viewpoints with an open heart and mind. No, when I want to understand the meaning of, say, a court ruling about gay marriage, I’m not going to go first to a site that…
  • John Kerry on the importance of an open-ish Internet

    davidw
    19 May 2015 | 9:42 am
    Secretary of State John Kerry gave a speech in Seoul yesterday about the Internet, setting out five principles of cybersecurity. The talk is quite enthusiastic and progressive about the Net. Sort of. For example, he says, “[t]he United States considers the promotion of an open and secure internet to be a key component of our foreign policy,” but he says this in support of his idea that it’s crucial to govern the Internet. On the third hand, the governance he has in mind is designed to keep the Net open to all people and all ideas. On the fourth hand, predictably, we…
  • CNN’s side of the conversation

    davidw
    17 May 2015 | 7:51 am
    Bernie Sanders gave as good an interview as he could this morning on CNN, trying to stick to the issues as Brianna Keilar repeatedly goaded him to attack Hillary Clinton, or to comment on the horse race. She asked only two questions about policy matters, and they were as non-incisive as questions could be. Twice Sanders said that he would not personlly attack Clinton, and turned the question back to Keilar, asking if the news media would focus on the serious issues facing the American 99.9%. Just listen to CNN’s side of the conversation, taken from the transcript: You’ve…
  • John Lennon: dreamer awake

    davidw
    15 May 2015 | 5:49 am
    I asked my mobile this morning to shuffle up Instant Karma – Save Dafur, a two-volume set of John Lennon covers. Great album. Big mistake. It played these tracks in this heart-breaking order:Imagine [lyrics]God (I don’t believe) [lyrics]Beautiful Boy [lyrics]Grow old with me [lyrics] I think I write about John Lennon every spring as I start to run and listen to music again. I’m pretty sure I say the same things every time. So I’m not going to say anything about this mix except that it shows why inconsistency is the truth. The post John Lennon: dreamer awake appeared…
  • The Matrix glitches and puts Bruce Schneier next to the head of the NSA

    davidw
    14 May 2015 | 3:19 pm
    Historic key signing? MT @ArmyCyberInst: @NSAGov & CyberCommand Mike Rogers & renowned security guru @Bruce_Schneier pic.twitter.com/CjmJR2K4lL — James Losey (@jameslosey) May 14, 2015 Bruce is one of the most visible, articulate, and smartest voices on behalf of preserving our privacy. (His new book, Data and Goliath, is both very readable and very well documented.) At an event at West Point, he met Admiral Mike Rogers, Director of the NSA. Bruce did an extensive liveblog of the Rogers’ keynote. There was no visible explosion, forcing physicists to rethink their…
 
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    craigconnects

  • How You Can Give Back to America's Heroes

    Craig Newmark
    21 May 2015 | 9:00 am
    I like to honor and support veterans and military families all year long, but with Memorial Day, I like to do some extra support to help out. This is the third year that I've supported the Veterans Charity Challenge, and we're raising money for orgs that support vets, milfams, police, and firefighters. Between last year and the previous year, more than $790K was raised to support orgs helping America's heroes. The Veterans Charity Challenge 3 begins May 21st at 12pm ET and runs through July 2nd at 1:59:59pm ET. We're hoping to raise even more this year. I've donated…
  • How I'm Funding Women-Led Startups

    Craig Newmark
    20 May 2015 | 9:00 am
    Folks, the Women Startup Challenge has really taken off, with over 180 startups participating and over $118K raised so far. Here are the the startups who are in the top 10 in the Women Startup Challenge as of today. 1. Peer Spring 2. Echo Media Mobile 3. Hookist 4. Actionplanr 5. Kicker 6. Fam-ess 7. Stage Stream 8. Mina's List 9. LGBTQutie  10. LatherUp Women are founding innovative startups more than ever before, yet only 7% of investor money goes to women-led startups. We want to help women pitch their startups, and get their startups funded. Investors say that they want to fund more…
  • 5 Reasons I’m Not Doing craigslist Management

    Craig Newmark
    18 May 2015 | 9:00 am
    I haven't been a spokesman for craigslist, or had any role in management since 2000. It took a lot to recognize my limitations as a manager, and then relinquish my CEO role. A LOT of people still think I'm still in a management role, and it gets reinforced by inaccurate articles that persist on the 'net. Here are 5 reasons I'm not in craigslist management anymore: 1. My deal is that, as a manager, I kinda suck. 2. I hired someone smarter than me to run the company, while I stick with customer service. 3. I really found my calling in customer service, and every day I see…
  • Why Birding Can Change the World

    Craig Newmark
    14 May 2015 | 8:09 am
    Birding is a popular thing that happens around the world. I like to view 'em from my home office, and in my Bay Area backyard. Western Tanagers are rare to see, but a real treat. You may remember that I donated some money to the Cornell Ornithology Lab to sponsor the Western Tanager. I spotted two on Saturday… (taken at limits of my telephoto lens) The Global Big Day just happened, and the worldwide response has been pretty impressive. Cornell's goal was to tally 4,000 species around the world in one day—but now they're at 5,800 and heading toward 6,000—almost 60% of…
  • 6 Startups Rocking the Women Startup Challenge

    Craig Newmark
    13 May 2015 | 10:03 am
    Hey, we’re two weeks into the Women Startup Challenge, and lots of startups really have their boots on the ground in Round One. The first Round of the Startup Challenge is a crowdfunding campaign. The purpose of this is to give all startups an opportunity to raise money for their startup. Over $80K has been raised online so far, and there’s still a coupla weeks left. Another startup has told us that they raised an additional $50K offline through a funder who learned about their efforts through the Women Startup Challenge. The first Bonus Challenge ended last week, and 3 startups won…
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    Jessica Gottlieb A Los Angeles Mom

  • If You Want to Change Your Life You Should Fire Your Friends

    Jessica Gottlieb
    20 May 2015 | 7:57 pm
    I’m done blogging. I’m not blogging again. Blogging is not my job and to every email pitching something that all the mommies will always love I simply reply, “I’m not a blogger anymore please take me off your list.” That felt really great. I like the idea of not being on every publicist’s email list. My peers have stopped blogging. Most of the women I worked with at Momversation have shuttered their sites. PhD In Parenting is no more and I’m not even sure what’s happening with other large sites. Most have been sold or are dying slow deaths. At…
  • Endings

    Jessica Gottlieb
    4 Apr 2015 | 8:52 pm
    One of the things that I’ve noticed as a reader is that there are a number of books that are good, great even, until the ending and then they sort of just unravel and stop. It’s as though the author knew they needed to stop writing but didn’t quite know how. I fear that this site has that problem. Blogging has changed and I haven’t. I was texting with a friend just a bit ago who also quit blogging recently and she said, “It sucks having gone from innovators to dinosaurs.” Consider this my mic drop. Blogging was my full time job for a number of years. They…
  • Parenting In Public

    Jessica Gottlieb
    31 Mar 2015 | 10:49 am
    Yesterday we went to a museum. Actually I should say that yesterday we went to yet another museum. A museum Mr. G had no interest in going to, a museum that Jane had been to just 10 days prior and the 8th museum in the third country that my son had visited since March 12th. Yesterday my family accompanied me to a museum that only I was interested in and after two hours of looking at paintings they waited for me outside the gift shop while I picked up some postcards. As I approached them they looked like this. This is how Gottliebs do museums and how I ensure that no one ever asks me for…
  • Bring it On and American Sniper

    Jessica Gottlieb
    20 Mar 2015 | 10:47 am
    I’m living on bread and butter and whatever else is making it’s way into the sandwiches. Mostly ham, always with at least one cheese. I might be gaining weight but it’s happy weight so it’s good. I think. Alexander arrived in Paris just a few hours ago so we settled him in and went for a walk along the St. Martin Canal. We found baguettes and wine from Bordeaux along with Coca Cola for Alexander. My leg is healing nicely but I’m still walking a bit slower than usual which is oddly a good thing. Without a little ache in my calf I’d never have wanted to be…
  • You’re Kind of a Bitch of a Mom Blogger

    Jessica Gottlieb
    16 Mar 2015 | 3:11 pm
    This weekend someone texted a link to a post on Scary Mommy along with the words, “read to the end”. So I did. I sputtered and reread the words and then I thought I’d read it again, I was incredulous. I haven’t read Scary Mommy since it was a one woman website and I knew it was raw, who doesn’t like raw? I didn’t know that it was for bad mothers. Not the kind of bad mothers like Catherine Connors, the tongue in cheek Her Bad Mother, but the kind of mothers who really do need some parenting classes, some boundaries and maybe a chat with their own families.
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    Betsy Devine: Funny ha-ha and/or funny peculiar

  • Ground control to Major Tom

    Betsy Devine
    26 Apr 2015 | 7:15 pm
    This 1969 David Bowie song has always brought tears to my eyes. And so (for the same reason) does Elton John’s song Rocket Man. Both these songs remind me of my brother Mark Devine (who died in 1998) — Mark never quite found a place on Earth that welcomed his big heart and maybe-too-bouncy spirit. Very, very early his imagination took off for some outer-space world of his own — only my mother’s hard work kept him still earth-connected as long as he stayed among us. It was not very long. Mark, I have not forgotten you. So much that is best in me is what was best in you.
  • When to the sessions…

    Betsy Devine
    29 Mar 2015 | 11:30 pm
    William Shakespeare knew a good idea when he saw it: When to the sessions of sweet silent thought I summon up remembrance of things past I sigh the cost of many a thing I sought But nonetheless recall… I had a blast! Oh whoops, I seem to have strayed from Shakespeare into my own thoughts. Just very recently home from a visit to China, which was amazing. Now very jet-lagged but with so many smiles at my memories.
  • Scientific diaspora

    Betsy Devine
    17 Feb 2015 | 11:04 pm
    Exiles in 1732, from Wikimedia CommonsThe US in the 1930s and 40s inherited the educational wealth of exiled German scientists. In the 1970s and 80s, we inherited the scientific wealth of a disintegrating Soviet Union. Now the US is headed toward the losing side of this equation. Once we valued education and research. Now US funding for both gets worse with every passing year. Young scientists are hit hardest. Research and teaching jobs in the US are going away. Frank and I were recently in China, where by contrast the government eagerly invests in universities and academic research. It…
  • Landscape vs. skyscape: selective appreciation

    Betsy Devine
    26 Jan 2015 | 9:24 pm
    Our windows face east, so the best view we get of sunset is the reflection of colorful sky in the high-rise student apartment building not far from us. I am not a big fan of modern architecture, but I am getting to love the many reflections of sky in the windows of University House. One the other hand, enjoying a beautiful view may require the ability to ignore less beautiful parts of the view. Or perhaps I could try to begin to admire the sight of vast acres of parking lot, low-rise cheap buildings, and macadam streets. That would also work.
  • Hotel fun, fun, fun till Daddy took the microwave popcorn away

    Betsy Devine
    17 Jan 2015 | 10:50 pm
    It was the best of times. It was the worst of times. It was a time when @frankwilczek was on sabbatical, so that the Marriott Residence Inn of Tempe AZ became our temporary home. We spent fun time with our children in the Marriott Residence Inn of Austin, TX, over Christmas break. Contrary to what your image may be of Texas, this was a smaller location with smaller rooms and a much less useful kitchen (no actual oven, and double beds rather than queen size.) Still the presence of children makes up for a lot, and the nearby-ness of Austin’s amazing Drafthouse Ritz Cinema makes up for…
 
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    inessential.com

  • How Not to Crash #4: Threading

    22 May 2015 | 2:46 pm
    Here’s a simple rule: do everything on the main thread. Machines and devices are so fast these days that you can do more on the main thread than you think you can. It’s a kind of paradise when you don’t have to think about concurrency because there isn’t any. But… I’m a performance junkie. Or, more to the point, I’m a user experience junkie, and the only thing worse than something being slow is being slow and noticeably blocking the main thread. Don’t do that. I’ll get to that. But let’s start with the main thread. The Main Thread Rule All the code I write expects to run…
  • How Not to Crash #3: NSNotification

    21 May 2015 | 2:36 pm
    In general, I prefer NSNotification to KVO and (especially) to bindings. I do use KVO sometimes — there are times when it’s the most sensible thing. But NSNotification, like many older APIs, is easier to use without crashing. But you still need to be careful. The One Way to Crash When an object registers for a notification, and then is deallocated without unregistering, then the app will crash if that notification is posted. That’s the thing you need to avoid. The rest of this article describes how to do that. The Big Rule I have one simple, hard-and-fast rule: NSNotifications are…
  • How Not to Crash #2: Mutation Exceptions

    16 May 2015 | 9:48 am
    You get a collection from somewhere and enumerate it — and then you get an error about the collection being mutated as it was being enumerated. The app crashes. You can avoid this unhappy fate with one simple trick: don’t enumerate mutable collections. Disagree with me You might hold the reasonable position that the real answer is not to mutate a mutable collection while enumerating it. You should have enough understanding of your app to be able to write code that safely enumerates a mutable collection. Yes, you should. You absolutely should. However: writing crash-free code is about…
  • How Not to Crash #1: KVO and Manual Bindings

    14 May 2015 | 3:20 pm
    I’ve been fixing crashing bugs recently — but rather than write about fixing crashing bugs, I thought it would be more interesting to write about not creating crashing bugs in the first place. In this first installment I’ll talk about KVO, manual bindings, retain cycles, and invalidate methods. Bindings means never having to say goodbye iOS developers don’t have this, but Mac folks do: we can bind a property to another property. We can make it so that if x.foo updates, then y.foo updates too. NSKeyValueBinding.h is in AppKit. Take a look at…
  • No Forgiveness

    8 May 2015 | 2:36 pm
    I was a fan of Alex Rodriguez when he was a Mariner. And I would have remained a fan when he left for the Rangers — because that’s baseball. Good and beloved players sometimes change teams. I remained a fan of Ken Griffey, Jr., Randy Johnson, and Ichiro Suzuki after they switched teams. But there was this in 2001: A-Rod believes Boeing should follow him to Texas. That comment from the former Mariners shortstop came up during a segment of CNBC’s show “Squawk Box” featuring Boeing Chairman and CEO Phil Condit. A-Rod was quoted on the show as making this pitch to Boeing, “I moved to…
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    RexBlog.com

  • PacMan Eats Up Amazon’s Home Page

    Rex Hammock
    22 May 2015 | 11:47 am
    Earlier this year, I noted a new design of Wired.com that supports “takeover” ads. These are not pop-over or pop-up ads that you can click an “x” to remove. These are ads that are actually a part of the background or are, in some graphical and often animated way, an actual element of the page. Today, I thought I saw Amazon come as close as I’ve seen it come to promoting a product using a takeover approach (that wasn’t a letter from Jeff Bezzos). However, upon looking at it more closely, I realized it was a standard size Amazon uses — a…
  • The First Photograph John T. Daniels Ever Took Was One of History’s Most Famous

    Rex Hammock
    21 May 2015 | 6:12 pm
    I’m reading (and listening to) David McCullough’s wonderful new book, The Wright Brothers. This isn’t a review, as I’ve only read about one-third of the book. But I’ve read enough to know that anyone who has ever has faced adversity and challenge and ridicule will recognize something familiar in the story. These brothers were from Dayton, Ohio, and funded the venture themselves. And besides, everyone know that no one would ever fly. Why? Because all of the big thinkers of the day said so. The American press had absolutely no interest in — nor belief in…
  • Google Maps Lakeside View

    Rex Hammock
    18 May 2015 | 8:17 pm
    In Nashville, a city that is in the midst of an unprecedented building boom, a prime piece of property has not participated in the boom. Instead, it became first, a giant hole and then, one of the most expensive lakes a person can imagine. However, Google Maps isn’t a person and it had no problem imagining it. Google Maps has spent the past several years codifying the creation of the giant lake on West End Avenue. A six year old post on a real estate blog tells the story up to that point. Since then, there has been another big deal announcement, some more digging, and a deal falling…
  • How would you define your content strategy?

    Rex Hammock
    18 May 2015 | 3:04 pm
    “Content is kind of a wanky term, which we have got to reframe. It’s commoditized, overused and misunderstood. (Our approach is) brand expression, it’s storytelling. What we’re trying to do is be topical, be loved, be endearing, be enduring and always, always try to surprise and delight. That’s the outcome we desire, what keeps us up at night and excited.” Peter McGuinness Chief Marketing Officer, Chobani (via: Digiday) Related posts: Not only am I a content marketer, this is a content marketing blog Great example of the third rule of marketing with content: Keep it simple…
  • Infographics vs. Explanation Graphics; No Contest

    Rex Hammock
    15 May 2015 | 9:00 am
    This week’s Idea Email at Hammock.com looks at the disconnect between the role infographics played during the late 1970s and 1980s and the role played today by what are called infographics. The idea places special emphasis on the use by infographics pioneer Nigel Holmes of the term “explanation graphics.” Quote: “In the past, the term infographics referred to a style of visual storytelling that sought to make the complex simple and the confusing comprehensible. Today, infographics is a term applied to a style of illustration that often displays bullet points of…
 
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    Berkeley Blog

  • U.S. Government Actually Doing Something Good

    Berkeley Blog
    21 May 2015 | 3:36 pm
    At the monthly tech lunch I host at Berkeley Rep, our speaker yesterday was an energetic champion of lifting the 1.4 billion people in the world out of poverty. You’d think Alexis Bonnell was the head of a nonprofit or UN agency, but she’s actually director of engagement and communications of USAID’s Global Development Lab, a one-year-old federal agency that works to end extreme global poverty.  The way it works – and it’s working – is by partnering with private and public institutions as well as with communities in the developing world. The lab is crowdsourcing problems and…
  • How Can There be Artificial Intelligence When We Still Don’t Understand Human Intelligence?

    Berkeley Blog
    7 May 2015 | 2:47 pm
    Today I went to hear a talk by NY Times science writer John Markoff about his forthcoming book, Machines of Loving Grace: The Quest for Common Ground Between Humans and Robots as a kick-off event for UC Berkeley’s new series on People and Robots hosted by the CITRIS department. Markoff said he framed the history of robotics, which he recounts in his book, as a dichotomy between those who want to augment human intelligence and those who think we can replace it. The latter group believes in the singularity, in which robots supercede humans. This simplistic framework enables the author to…
  • Philanthropists Try to Patch up the Very Inequality They Created

    Berkeley Blog
    25 Apr 2015 | 1:25 pm
    Last night I went to an event at SF Impact Hub for Ai-Jen Poo’s superslim book, Dignity – more like a long article with appendixitis – about supporting workers in the senior care business as well as seniors and their families. Everyone I talked to was working for a foundation: Haas, Jr., Haas, Sr., Omidyar, and myriad family foundations too obscure to recall. What I know about philanthropists –tech billionaires like Eric Schmidt, Bill Gates, and Marc Benioff – is that they made their cash from the labor of others and by paying themselves hundreds of times more than their average…
  • Competitive Sports Fuel Silicon Valley Culture

    Berkeley Blog
    30 Mar 2015 | 1:44 pm
    In 1999, during the height of the tech boom when I had so many clients I couldn’t even recall their URLs, I hired a former world cycling champion as my coach and took up amateur bicycle racing for the Berkeley Bicycle Club (the BBC). Every day, rain or shine, I worked out two hours, doing intervals – short, painfully fast stretches up hills or on flats -- or endurance rides, which meant a ride of 60 to 70 miles with several thousand feet of climbing – all before lunch. On the weekends, starting in February and ending in June, I’d wake up at 4 a.m. and travel to some desolate Central…
  • What If More Women Wrote Code? We'd Have a Love App, for Sure.

    Berkeley Blog
    22 Mar 2015 | 2:03 pm
    Last night I went to a benefit for Global Girl Media (www.globalgirlmedia.org), a nonprofit dedicated to empowering girls from underserved communities to learn and apply media tools to tell stories through their own perspectives. About 100 girls, women, boys and men jammed Impact Hub, a former industrial space now a mezzanine-rimmed work space, in downtown Oakland, where actor and humanitarian (Aren’t we all?) Danny Glover proclaimed, “We need to change the narrative. “When we look at the world through the eyes of women,” he added, “that’s how we change the narrative.” Makes…
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    gapingvoid

  • What matters

    Valerie Urso
    8 May 2015 | 8:04 am
    visit the store   Every now and then I’ll do a pretty random cartoon. This one qualifies. I’ve always liked churches and religious architecture in general. They’re like constant spiritual reminders in the landscape. Here, I imagined being somewhere in the desert in the Levant. Maybe Israel or Syria or even further East, and seeing an ancient holy place… A church, mosque or temple of some sort. The actual religion doesn’t matter so much. What matters is the “A-Ha!”.
  • If you’re waiting in line for a career, you’re doing something wrong

    Valerie Urso
    29 Apr 2015 | 12:50 pm
      get the print Back when I lived in London in the ‘Nineties, I vaguely knew this Irish journalist, call him Simon. He was a flatmate of an old school friend of mine. Simon wasn’t famous or anything, but he was always working. He was pretty successful. He drove a nice car, ate in fancy places and seemed to enjoy his life. Of all the journalists I knew personally, he was by far the most self-assured. What was his secret? It wasn’t that he was smarter or a better writer than the other journalists. There are plenty smart people who can write well in that trade. What made him…
  • Freelancer: 10 Questions with Seth Godin

    Valerie Urso
    22 Apr 2015 | 12:39 pm
    (This was a cartoon I drew for Seth’s excellent book, The Dip. You can purchase the print here.) My old friend and frequent book collaborator, Seth Godin has a new online course out on Udemy, entitled “Seth Godin’s Freelancer Course”. I checked it out, I liked it a lot. But instead of just reviewing it, I’d thought I’d use this opportunity to ask Seth ten questions. Voila:   1. OK, the basic skinny: What’s the course about, and why now? This is the golden age for freelancers. More opportunities, more tools, more leverage than ever before. But for many freelancers,…
  • Engagement? What engagement?

    Valerie Urso
    15 Apr 2015 | 4:17 pm
      (purchase here) As you know, a lot of the art we do at Gapingvoid is for the “Employment Engagement” side of our clients’ business. That’s a good thing. Helping people to hate their jobs less (or love their jobs more, depending on your perspective) is time well spent. According to Gallup, only 13% of American workers are engaged with their jobs. I’ve seen other figures say similar things, namely, 80% of people don’t care for their jobs very much. Engagement? What engagement? We could argue the exact numbers, but we can all agree that the cost to industry is high. According…
  • This Week At Gapingvoid: March 30 – April 3

    Valerie Urso
    4 Apr 2015 | 11:32 am
    order now We get tired. We stop caring. Happens to the best of us. It’s self-preservation. The downside of empathy. Sometimes the world seems overwhelmingly full of darkness. This cartoon is a happy way to remember, we’re not responsible for everything. We’re just responsible for our small part. order now Everyone aspires to greatness on some level. This is as true for companies and teams as it is for individuals. And what gets in the way of achieving greatness? Usually it’s nothing too complicated. Simple stuff like good manners, keeping your word and yes, open and honest…
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    Derek Sivers

  • Simplify: move code into database functions

    Derek Sivers
    3 May 2015 | 5:00 pm
    If you are a web or API developer, programming code that uses an SQL database, this is for you. I’ve found a very different and useful way to structure code. It’s made such a big difference for me that I had to share it here. How things are Most web development — whether custom or using frameworks like Rails, Django, Laravel, Sinatra, Flask, and Symfony — tends to work the same way: At the core is a database, which is just the storage of data. All intelligence is in Ruby/Python/PHP/JavaScript classes. Why that’s bad These norms have some dangerous implications: Everything must go…
  • Getting out of a bad place

    Derek Sivers
    31 Jan 2015 | 4:00 pm
    This was actually a private email to a good friend. But he loved it and forwarded it to some people, and they all suggested I should post it on my site. Hey B - A few months ago I was in a really bad place. Really upset ALL the time about the whole situation. Couldn’t think straight. Very reactionary. Wanting to make some big drastic change, just to ease the discomfort of uncertainty — that pain of living with an unknown future. You’re definitely in that place now. So here’s how I got out. Maybe it helps. #1. Ask myself “What’s wrong RIGHT NOW?” — this very second. Am I in…
  • How to change or build your career

    Derek Sivers
    5 Oct 2014 | 5:00 pm
    I get emails from many people wanting to change or build their career. I always recommend the best book on the subject: “So Good They Can’t Ignore You” by Cal Newport. Here are a few of its best points: Forget passion and purpose Forget “follow your passion” or “find your true calling”. Stop thinking like that. Here’s why: Words like “passion” and “purpose” are dangerous because they sound huge and romantic. If you think you haven’t found your passion yet, you’re probably expecting it to be overwhelming — to hit you like lightning. Looking for your passion,…
  • Fixed mindset vs Growth mindset

    Derek Sivers
    20 Sep 2014 | 5:00 pm
    One of the most important concepts I’ve learned is the difference between the “fixed” mindset and the “growth” mindset. It’s a little bit like “nature vs nurture”: People in a fixed mindset believe you either are or aren’t good at something, based on your inherent nature, because it’s just who you are. People in a growth mindset believe anyone can be good at anything, because your abilities are entirely due to your actions. This sounds simple, but it’s surprisingly deep. The fixed mindset is the most common and the most harmful, so it’s worth understanding and…
  • I love being wrong

    Derek Sivers
    8 Sep 2014 | 5:00 pm
    Most of the time I feel smart, successful, and driven - like I’ve got it all figured out. But last month a bunch of stuff knocked me on my ass. I’ve never felt so wrong. I vulnerably called on friends for help. Amber reminded me to pull my head out of today, and think long-term again. Jeff told me to get my swagger back and relish the moment. Ariel said I should really accept and feel this pain, instead of moving on so fast like I always do. Each different perspective made me feel good for a while, then I’d fall back into the whirlpool of destructive thoughts. Whenever something’s…
 
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